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1000 years old Turkic burial ground in Anatolia

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Paradigm of Humanity View Drop Down
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    Posted: 03 Jan 2012 at 18:07
A 1000 years old burial ground recently discovered in Anatolia.



Burial ground discovered belongs to 10th and 11th centuries during archeological excavations near Amasya province Oluz Höyük site. Burials belong to 99 frontier Turkic people.

Excavations carried out by Istanbul Univercity. Burials have traces of pre-Islamic Turkic traditions. According to NTV Tarih (NTV History) Magazine, most interesting grave is belongs to an 8 years old girl who buried in Islamic style and had ear rings near her ear level. Further research carried out for the girl due she was best condition among burials. In light of her hydrocephalin skull she probably died from a disease. Her face reconstructed with plastetalin and silicon like special materials.


etc... It goes like that, it's my poor translation... I think that Turkic face is so exiting about our spiritual ancestors (but not genetical ancestors). Findings really fascinating Approve


Edited by Paradigm of Humanity - 03 Jan 2012 at 18:09
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2012 at 18:12
I don't speak Turkish and so cannot read everything. But I am a bit surprised by this article. My understanding is that during this period the people in this region were firmly Orthodox Christian, and would most likely have belonged to the Constantinopolitan Patriarchate.

How do you explain the existance of Muslim burials so deep within Byzantine territory during this particular period?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2012 at 18:23
You are correct, these are just pioneers of Turkic nomadic tribes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2012 at 18:28
So does this indicate that the Byzantines had very poor control over their frontiers? Does it demonstrate that prior to the main Turkish invasion, there were already large groups of nomadic Turks living in Byzantine Anatolia?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2012 at 18:36
Actually there wasn't any main invasion I think. After few decisive battles between Romans and Seljuks, Romans cannot able to field a suffient army to stop Turkic invaders. So on, nomadic Turkics began to imiggrate to Asia Minor in waves. But of course, they always remanied as a tiny minority in Asia Minor. Still I had limited information about this issue. Our scholarly members like Flipper may give you a more accurate answer.


Edited by Paradigm of Humanity - 03 Jan 2012 at 18:39
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2012 at 18:40
I am mostly curious because, if there were already groups of Turkic nomads living in Anatolia, I wonder what form of support they may have been able to provide to the main Turkic body which migrated into Anatolia afte the Battle of Manzikert.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2012 at 18:55
Hmm... It still possible that they can come after Mankizert (1071 AD). Amasya is the place where burials found.

1073 AD



1074 AD


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2012 at 19:01
The Byzantines: what a pack of losers.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mukarrib Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2012 at 23:40
I think the 'border' between the Islamic & Christian worlds was fairly fluid. It was constantly moving back and forwards, and leading up to the establishment of the Seljuq Sultanate of Rum there was constant attempts by the Muslims to move on Constantinople, since the earliest days of Islam.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Hidden Face Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2012 at 03:57
Originally posted by Constantine XI Constantine XI wrote:


How do you explain the existance of Muslim burials so deep within Byzantine territory during this particular period?

Probably because of the way how nomads live. Even today nomadic people aren't controlled easily by modern states. Having considered that there was no visa required to enter Anatolia at that time, Turkic nomads could easily penatrate into inner Anatolia. The political borders of the states in the middle ages were only for political opponents, not for randomly moving unarmed nomads.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Jan 2012 at 01:39
Originally posted by Paradigm of Humanity Paradigm of Humanity wrote:

Our scholarly members like Flipper may give you a more accurate answer.


Well, POH I am quite loose on that era so I cannot say anything more specific. Hidden Face gave the most probable scenario I think.

In any case it is really impressive to see the girl reconstruction. It is always impressive to see how people were back in the days.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jan 2012 at 10:13
How are you going to stop nomads crossing frontiers in the 11th century with any great effectiveness?  It would be such a waste of effort to even try beyond your own settlements and farmlands.  Turkic tribes had been poking around in the region for quite some centuries at this point and relatively easily lived off the wilderness in Anatolia as the Byzantines eventually found to their detriment.  Wilderness that to them was not strategic and pretty much worthless.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jorgea Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jan 2012 at 13:08
This is a most exciting discovery. A number of unanswered questions surrounding her burial uncovering. Thanks for sharing this news here at http://www.worldhistoria.com  
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