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Ancient Coinage

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KnightsTemplar View Drop Down
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    Posted: 28 May 2010 at 06:18
Hi to all, I find this topic awesome to discuss. So, let's discuss.

Apparently some times between the Ancient Roman Empire in 500 A.D. to the Byzantine Empire in 1300 A.D., there has been a coin system that I like to call, "Roman market." Basically, I want to collect data on every single type of coin used during this time. One I know for certain is called a stater:



This was a gold stater from around 250 B.C. to 125 A.D. Typical daily coin, it has a very clear outline of technology used from back then, which is simply, time and tools. Take a close look at the margin of the circle, and you can see quite well that it is very intricately carved from gold. I want to gather all the ancient coins into one thread, so that I may return to in the future when I get bored.

Post your ideas, and if you happen to know about any other types of ancient coins from any European civilization, please do not hesitate to share Sleepy I appreciate all contribution to this soon-popular-mega-pack of info.

-KnightsTemplar
I search for remnants of the past, gathering as much knowledge as I possibly can. The tales of the Knights Templar fascinates me the most, therefore, my title was created in their honor.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2010 at 06:49
I have some photos of coins from several cultures to post. For the moment I can post a follow up from what you already posted.

That is Eukratides, the Greco-Bactrian Kings gold coin. Here is another one, kinda special for its shape and its 2 languages.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2010 at 07:09
Originally posted by KnightsTemplar KnightsTemplar wrote:

Hi to all, I find this topic awesome to discuss. So, let's discuss.

Apparently some times between the Ancient Roman Empire in 500 A.D. to the Byzantine Empire in 1300 A.D., there has been a coin system that I like to call, "Roman market." Basically, I want to collect data on every single type of coin used during this time. One I know for certain is called a stater:



This was a gold stater from around 250 B.C. to 125 A.D. Typical daily coin, it has a very clear outline of technology used from back then, which is simply, time and tools. Take a close look at the margin of the circle, and you can see quite well that it is very intricately carved from gold. I want to gather all the ancient coins into one thread, so that I may return to in the future when I get bored.

Post your ideas, and if you happen to know about any other types of ancient coins from any European civilization, please do not hesitate to share Sleepy I appreciate all contribution to this soon-popular-mega-pack of info.

-KnightsTemplar


That coin looks Bactrian to me. Definitely Diadochi in my humble opinion.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2010 at 21:10
"Carved from gold" had nothing to do with it all all! As for all this imagery it comes straight from Wiki...
 
 
As for the data you seek begin with Timothy Green. The Ages of Gold. London: GFMS, 2007.
 
BTW there is an entire forum on-line dealing with the subject:
 


Edited by drgonzaga - 28 May 2010 at 21:10
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KnightsTemplar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2010 at 23:56
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

"Carved from gold" had nothing to do with it all all! As for all this imagery it comes straight from Wiki...
 
 
As for the data you seek begin with Timothy Green. The Ages of Gold. London: GFMS, 2007.
 
BTW there is an entire forum on-line dealing with the subject:
 


Yes well I only wanted to show an example of the Roman stater that was equally popular to our quarters. Stater. Quarter. There's a resemblance.

Originally posted by Flipper Flipper wrote:

I have some photos of coins from several cultures to post. For the moment I can post a follow up from what you already posted.

That is Eukratides, the Greco-Bactrian Kings gold coin. Here is another one, kinda special for its shape and its 2 languages.




I assume these two coins are engraved with Ancient Greek? The details of the coin are pretty low quality, suggesting that they didn't get enough time in the blacksmith, or the place that makes coins.

-KnightsTemplar


Edited by KnightsTemplar - 28 May 2010 at 23:56
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 02:47
Templar wrote:
 
Yes well I only wanted to show an example of the Roman stater that was equally popular to our quarters. Stater. Quarter. There's a resemblance.

First, the Graeco-Bactrian "stater" has no relationship whatsoever to Roman coinage [there was never a Roman "stater"-- and coinage from the aureus to the as was quite standard from the Republic to the Diocletian Monetary Reform in the 3rd century AD, which introduced the argentius, the follis and the solidus]. Second, "blacksmiths" never produced coinage and lastly there is absolutely no relationship between the American quarter dollar and the "stater", Roman or otherwise! Our famed "two bits" is the direct progeny of the Spanish "dos reales", which together with the peso circulated as legal tender in the United States even at the eve of the Civil War!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2010 at 09:22
Originally posted by KnightsTemplar KnightsTemplar wrote:




I assume these two coins are engraved with Ancient Greek? The details of the coin are pretty low quality, suggesting that they didn't get enough time in the blacksmith, or the place that makes coins.

-KnightsTemplar


The one side is in Greek (King Eucratides the Great) and the other in Bactrian which is an Easter Iranic language.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KnightsTemplar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 May 2010 at 07:53
Originally posted by Flipper Flipper wrote:

Originally posted by KnightsTemplar KnightsTemplar wrote:




I assume these two coins are engraved with Ancient Greek? The details of the coin are pretty low quality, suggesting that they didn't get enough time in the blacksmith, or the place that makes coins.

-KnightsTemplar


The one side is in Greek (King Eucratides the Great) and the other in Bactrian which is an Easter Iranic language.


Yes, now I see. Thank you for clearing that up. Here's another type of stater:



This is a Naxos stater, around 6th century B.C. You can see the imperfect circle and the rough edges around the shape. It is silver, and quite a piece in a collection.

-KnightsTemplar



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 May 2011 at 18:43
It is some what sad that this line of posts died. There are thousands of differing coins available for study, and posting on this site.

What is strange, is that no one remarked about the very similar visage, as seen from the side, that existed upon the "golden" coin and the "bronze" one! In my eye, they are almost exactly the same.

I would then propose that one of them might well be a fake?

BTW, I assume that most of you know that of all (80-90%) of the thousands of Arabic/Muslim? coins found in the North of Europe were found upon the isle of the Goths/Gots/Gods/goats/geats, etc.!

Regards,
Ron

Edited by opuslola - 20 May 2011 at 18:44
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 May 2011 at 18:47
Originally posted by Constantine XI Constantine XI wrote:


Originally posted by KnightsTemplar KnightsTemplar wrote:

Hi to all, I find this topic awesome to discuss. So, let's discuss.Apparently some times between the Ancient Roman Empire in 500 A.D. to the Byzantine Empire in 1300 A.D., there has been a coin system that I like to call, "Roman market." Basically, I want to collect data on every single type of coin used during this time. One I know for certain is called a stater:This was a gold stater from around 250 B.C. to 125 A.D. Typical daily coin, it has a very clear outline of technology used from back then, which is simply, time and tools. Take a close look at the margin of the circle, and you can see quite well that it is very intricately carved from gold. I want to gather all the ancient coins into one thread, so that I may return to in the future when I get bored.Post your ideas, and if you happen to know about any other types of ancient coins from any European civilization, please do not hesitate to share Sleepy I appreciate all contribution to this soon-popular-mega-pack of info.-KnightsTemplar
That coin looks Bactrian to me. Definitely Diadochi in my humble opinion.


From my vantage point, I would date the above coin to some where from the 15th century CE to the 17th century CE!

But, of course, I am not an expert!

Regards,
Ron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 May 2011 at 00:13
In Numismatics as with almost everything else sir, you are a charlatan! That you appear in almost every thread to insert irrelevancies and assert the ludicrous is wearing thin. The coin above is a classic stater minted in Bactria by Eucratides (171-145 BC) and CIX is quite correct in his attribution (since on the reverse can be found the Greek inscription Basileos Megalou Eukratidou). Samples of his coinage are not that rare nor is his obverse visage under question.Of course KT is absurdly wrong in positing that this coin was "carved". It was "struck" in the manner then prevalent and the image is formulaic.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 May 2011 at 01:42
Yes, docktor, I know the realm wherin this coin is now dated, but the head and the hat/armored head, does not, in my opinion, describe someone from that era!

But, perhaps you can show us all a "lot" of other 171-145 BCE images/ representations, other than coins, which show such features?

I would love to see them.


Thanks for bringing it to my attention!

Regards,

Edited by opuslola - 21 May 2011 at 01:43
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 May 2011 at 03:53
Do your own homework with respect to Seleucid/Parthian coinage as well as the "art" of the Didachoi. It should give you a welcome change from plagiarizing the antics of the Fomeko crowd. Since you are an avid poster of Wiki discussions pehaps you'd care to pollute...er polemicize on their pages. They do have an entry on the Greco-Bactrians, or didn't you know?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 May 2011 at 20:29
Yes sir, I do know so, and I have even read it!

So, just what is your ultimate point?

In my opinion, it is the cut of the die, and the shape of the helmet that causes my concern.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2011 at 00:42
As you said, "you are not an expert" and that should suffice as effective dismissal of your trolling.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2011 at 22:46
And, sir! Are you then an expert? My opinion might well not be a version of the "Status Quo!", but it is merely my evaluation, based in part upon the works of the FG.

Again, is one's opinion now to be considered as "trolling", or is your invective?

I believe in one of your above posts you referred to me as a "charlatan!"

NO Sir, I do not dabble in leger-demain!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Mar 2015 at 16:29
For a forum dedicated to ancient coins, one might check out "forum ancient coins."

For authenticating, they would prefer to have both sides of the coin depicted (edge good too),
and the weight.
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