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Ancient Economic Integration

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JackWinter View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JackWinter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Ancient Economic Integration
    Posted: 02 Apr 2011 at 05:39
Dear all,

I would like to research ancient economic integration. I know that indicators of economic integration could be craft specialisation, and control of the allocation of products and price control.
Correlating objects in culturally valuated contexts, can shed light on the integration.

My point is, I would like to test the strenght of dependency between the materials if the context is held a constant.
I found out that a mathematical Pearons correlation, or a partial correlation is highly suitable for testing this dependency between variables. The problem is, that within my research, there is actually nothing to calculate as a mathematical equation, because I am dealing with merely objects in the ground.

Is there some methodology to get a correlation in a non-mathematical way perhaps?

Kind regards,
Jack
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gcle2003 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Apr 2011 at 06:01

If your material can be placed in some sort of rank order, even though there is no way of dirctly calculating a value, then there are rank-order correlation coefficients you can use.

A search of wikipedia using 'rank order correlation' will bring you up some useful pages, though it does not have a specific page of its own.
 
There's an interesting looking site at http://www.statsoft.com/textbook/nonparametric-statistics/ 
 
(which discusses the general problem of not having mathematical parameters for statistics.)
 
You could also google around for 'association coefficient', which demands very little mathematical treatment of the data.  
 
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Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

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JackWinter View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JackWinter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Apr 2011 at 22:43
Dear Gcle2003

Thank your for your swift response! I will take a look at this.

Kind regards, Jack
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Omar al Hashim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Apr 2011 at 17:25
I would look for a statistics textbook on the subject. Because I expect that this is a well explored field, with multiple methods of achieving the result based upon exactly what input data you have. A singular mathematical tool incorrectly applied can give you misleading results.
 
Finding a good textbook requires a little bit of research in itself, but pays huge dividends if you do.


Edited by Omar al Hashim - 06 Apr 2011 at 14:57
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gcle2003 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Apr 2011 at 21:54
It's certainly a well-explored field. I don't specifically recall the original texbooks I had - it's a long time ago now, but a quick check with amazon shows that searching on 'non-parametric statistics' brings up a whole host of possibilities, if the web isn't enough.
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Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guaporense Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2011 at 07:57
Ancient economic history is a field of very little raw data. I think that using econometric methods on such a field is almost impossible due to the lack of raw data.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hobgoblin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jun 2013 at 00:20
A statistical approach will probably be impossible due to incomplete evidence. As you have already noted craft specialisation is a key factor, however its nature would have to be defined in terms of: 

Entirely full time or part time. I.E.does the craft person perform other economic tasks such as farming or domestic management making the craft unit less specialised and more independant.

Seasonality of work, I.E. do the craft specialists produce throughout the year or specifically in one season and what, economically, do they do in any non productive seasons. 

Are the craft specialists sedentary or itinerant. I.E. do they produce for and rely on more than one  economic  unit.

Such a study should also take in to account all non economically productive members, such as bureaucrats, soldiers and political elites as they are part of the economic system in the form of consumption in return for non material benefits.

And finally 
Economic integration is shaped by the subsistence strategy of any particular society from hunters, gathers, fishers, farmers and herders and the ways in which they mix with a society and between them, as these bedrocks of society are part of the economy and dictate what percentage of and when society is free to pursue specialisations. 
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