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Anglo-Saxons in the Caucasus

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    Posted: 14 May 2016 at 05:13
A number of years ago I read about the exile of the Anglo-Saxon aristocracy from England after it was conquered by William the Bastard.  Only about 10% of the old Germanic aristocracy remained in the Kingdom of England. And the rest? In two medieval sources , they are said to have gone to Byzantium.

While some historians have suggested that the land "formerly ruled by the Roman (Byzantine) Emperor" they received as reward for service was in the Crimea, I have another theory. I think they went to the Caucasus. Years ago, there was discovered military equipment which was distinctly of a northwest European origin found there by archaeologists. Yet no crusade to that region ever took place.

I think it is more than likely that the Anglo-Saxons ended up settling in a country which today bears the name of the patron saint of their old homeland: Georgia.

Who knows, maybe even this guy had a bit of Anglo-Saxon in him:


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 May 2016 at 08:00
That's a very interesting theory, and well within the realms of possibility.

I thinks there's a lot to be revealed about movements of people in and around the Caucasus in more recent history.

I'd love for more work to be done on the Caucasian skeletons found in the Tarim Basin of China.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Windemere Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 May 2016 at 16:37
I don't know about the Caucasus or Transcaucasus. But England's Anglo-Saxon nobility did have some ties to Kievan Rus, which they'd probably acquired from the Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish nobility. After the Battle of Hastings, King Harold II Godwinson's sons and daughter fled to Denmark. The daughter, Gytha, was later  from there sent as a bride to Vladimir IIMonomakh of Kievan Rus. Gytha had several children with Vladimir. Their son inherited the throne of Kievan Rus, and their descendants spread throughout the Russian nobility, from thence to the Hungarian royal family, and from there over the centuries they gradually intermarried with western European royalty and nobility. The present British royal family has a descent from them.

It would be interesting to see if there's any Anglo-Saxon connection from Russia to the Caucasus.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Melisende Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Mar 2017 at 06:15
A post by Dr Caitlin Green on her blog may be of interest:

"Although the name 'New England' is now firmly associated with the east coast of America, this is not the first place to be called that. In the medieval period there was another Nova Anglia, 'New England', and it lay far to the east of England, rather than to the west, in the area of the Crimean peninsula. The following post examines some of the evidence relating to this colony, which was said to have been established by Anglo-Saxon exiles after the Norman conquest of 1066 and seems to have survived at least as late as the thirteenth century."

Source: http://www.caitlingreen.org/2015/05/medieval-new-england-black-sea.html?spref=fb&m=1


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Mar 2017 at 07:41
Melisende

Thanks for your post and the link.

I've read part of Dr.Greens post, and am about to read the rest now.

Very interesting.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Mar 2017 at 03:48
Londina, ..what religion would they have followed?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Mar 2017 at 08:31
Originally posted by Vanuatu Vanuatu wrote:

Londina, ..what religion would they have followed?

Say what?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Mar 2017 at 15:00
Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

Originally posted by Vanuatu Vanuatu wrote:

Londina, ..what religion would they have followed?

Say what?

I thought that the Crimean wasn't Christianized until the 4th century. Which religious groups existed on the Crimean Peninsula the time? was it Muslims? Would Christians from Western Europe be practicing in Crimea? Rhetorical really


Edited by Vanuatu - 31 Mar 2017 at 15:29
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Apr 2017 at 01:59
Originally posted by Vanuatu Vanuatu wrote:

Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

Originally posted by Vanuatu Vanuatu wrote:

Londina, ..what religion would they have followed?

Say what?

I thought that the Crimean wasn't Christianized until the 4th century. Which religious groups existed on the Crimean Peninsula the time? was it Muslims? Would Christians from Western Europe be practicing in Crimea? Rhetorical really

The region now known as The Crimea may well not have been christianised until the 4th Century, but as demonstrated by the Mongols and others, some countries were tolerant of the religions of others. Is it possible that a pocket of Romanised, Latin speaking people did in fact migrate to the Crimea?

I can't see any reason why not.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Apr 2017 at 06:02
Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

Originally posted by Vanuatu Vanuatu wrote:

Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

Originally posted by Vanuatu Vanuatu wrote:

Londina, ..what religion would they have followed?

Say what?

I thought that the Crimean wasn't Christianized until the 4th century. Which religious groups existed on the Crimean Peninsula the time? was it Muslims? Would Christians from Western Europe be practicing in Crimea? Rhetorical really

The region now known as The Crimea may well not have been christianised until the 4th Century, but as demonstrated by the Mongols and others, some countries were tolerant of the religions of others. Is it possible that a pocket of Romanised, Latin speaking people did in fact migrate to the Crimea?

I can't see any reason why not.

Agree. 
There were a number of Christian settlements in Syria, Palestine, Egypt and Anatolia. Millennialism, Anti-Christ and Second Coming of Christ spurred attacks against the Turks, thus the end to Christian settlements in Asia Minor.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Apr 2017 at 09:59
Not only, but also, there were small missionary communities which were permitted to settle in various countries.

I mentioned the Mongols, and it's recorded that in the first Mongol City ever built, Karakorum, there were Roman Catholics, Muslims, Rosicrusians and other schools of religeous thought, all living and operating at the same time.
"Tá mé bródúil as mo oidhreacht na hÉireann".
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