| FORUM | ARCHIVE |                    | TOTAL QUIZ RESULT |


  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Commanders at Sea -- Admirals in power!
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login


Welcome stranger, click here to read about some of the great benefits of registering for a free account with us and joining us in our global online community.


Commanders at Sea -- Admirals in power!

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
rider View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar

Joined: 09 Aug 2004
Location: Norwich, UK
Status: Offline
Points: 5520
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rider Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Commanders at Sea -- Admirals in power!
    Posted: 31 Jul 2009 at 04:07
So, I'm fairly confident we've done this a dozen times on the old forum, but this turned up again on the Fb listings, and well... why not.
 
Every country with access to the sea has likely provided a good old seadog, and it is about those that this topic intends to be.
 
Sure, we all know Nelson and Nimitz and their endeavours in their respective theaters. However, in general I would suppose that naval commanders are less known and that for no good reason.
 
So, who would you rank finest amongst the chaps that ever roamed the sea?
 
Just to make a point, I'll introduce you to the only (I believe, though we may have had another) man to ever gain the rank of admiral (rear admiral at that) in the Estonian Republic. Johan Pitka was a great organizer and commander during the War of Liberation and then during the peacetime as well. He is mainly known for putting together the first of the armoured trains and he also assisted with the concurrent trains -- he also joined in with his factories when the armoured cars where needed. He was assigned to command the navy and I do believe that he was in direct command of the navy during two naval descente's although I have no means of confirming it at the moment. Later on, after the war, he was the driving force in the state to develop a force of submarines and organized public collections of money for that.
 
Speaking of more well known people, we have de Ruyter, Drake, Buchanan, M. Agrippa, Plinius the Elder (would that be Maior, btw?), von Reuter, von Spee, von Tirpitz, Rozhetsvenski (Anglization may be different than the norm at the moment). That's a few of whom I know the name and some of their deeds performed -- yet, I am sure that the true brilliance that's behind these names is simply astonishing and that we could take the time to inspect them worthy of their vocation.


Edited by rider - 31 Jul 2009 at 04:08
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2009 at 05:30

Van Tromp comes directly to mind to join de Ruyter for the Netherlands. One of the diffiulties here though is that till late in the day fleets, insofar as they existed, were split between the fighting side and the sailing side, so that there were few true 'admirals' until the 18th century outside Britain and the Netherlands.

Carlo Grimaldi (Monaco) and Andrea Doria (Genoa) come to mind from the earlier age of galleys, Carlo mainly because the Grimaldis burned down my home town.
 
Successful French admirals are difficult to think of, thoug de Villeneuve, who was beaten at Trafalgar, mifht well have done better against someone else. The Comte de Grasse though must have a mention for winning at Chesapeake Bay, the last time the Royal Navy would be defeated for 133 years.
 
I could give you a long list of British admirals, starting with Joh Jarvis, Earl St Vincent, and probably the most influential figure in the creation of the dominat RN, but I'll only mention Lord Cochrane, as much as anything for his post-1815 career in South America. 
 
The most successful admiral of WW2 in my opinion was Cunningham in the Mediterranean, British control of which was vital to the success of the war. Otherwise in ww2 Nimitz and Halsey get the credit for Midway and Leyte Gulf respectively, key events in the Pacific war.
 
I'll probably have another bite at this cherry, but I have to fo watch the cricket highlights.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
Seko- View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 01 Sep 2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 11687
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2009 at 05:58
Just a few for now.

American - The Famous and the obscure

John Paul Jones. Father of the US Navy
Alfred Thayer Mahan, not an Admiral but he wrote the book that others based their Navies on.


Roman -

Gaius Dulius of grappling hook fame.
Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa though a general his victory at Actium deserves some merit.


Ottoman -

Barbaros Hayreddin Pasha (Barbarrosa, aka Red beard) is the grandfather of Turkish Navy. Today, Turkish seamen salute his mausoleum with a cannon shot before leaving for naval operations.

Turgut Reis (Dragut). Supreme commander and successor to Red Beard.






Edited by Seko - 31 Jul 2009 at 23:22
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2009 at 07:21
Well, to be an admiral in my book (and in English) requires being a seaman. Otherwise among the Romans the most famous successful commander of a naval force would be Pompey the Great, no? Among the Greeks it would then be Themistocles I guess for Salamis. It's a bit like trying to decide whether to count Bedford Forrest as a cavalry commander, rather than a commander of infantry who rode horses.
 
Mahan was technically an admiral though he never served as one, his highest service rank being Captain. All retired captains who served in the Civil War (as Mahan did, in no very distinguished manner) were promoted to Rear Admiral by Congress under Teddy Roosevelt.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
rider View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar

Joined: 09 Aug 2004
Location: Norwich, UK
Status: Offline
Points: 5520
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rider Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2009 at 07:51
For some reason I've completely let Heihachiro Togo (the architect behind the destruction of the Russian Baltic Fleet at Tsushima) slip.
 
Also, the Admirality (am I allowed to use the term outside of GB context at all?) in the WW2 Japan deserves a mention -- Yamamoto Isoroku being one of the most outstanding in that war.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.137 seconds.