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Deadly skin trade preys on African Albino's

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2009 at 21:25
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Of course they can. Just look at the representants from Africa in the Copenhagen meeting, they are quite literate, and more educated than most ordinary people in both Chile and Sweden.
 
They should use theirs intelligence to fix the mess, then. Don't you think?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2009 at 23:03
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

As I mentioned, by the right precatuions many of the problems with food could be rectified. Better and more even distribution of wealth and resources could even out this and more growing of food crops instead of growing crops for sale.
Of course there are other ecological and geographical hindrances but much of it could be evened out with better management, both the authorities in the African countries but also with better and more adequate help from the rich part of the world.
 
If those things does not help, then maybe you could write a letter to the governments of Subsaharan Africa and ask them to implement a one child policy in their repective countries. Would be interesting to read the answers from their secretaries, if you ever received any LOL
 
Ah, a return to the glory days of "subsistence agriculture"! Industrialized agriculture [e.g. cash crops] is certainly not the villain here and I suspect that the principal villains in the countries under discussion are the actual political wonks enamoured with the foolishness of central planning and other such gizmos as they attempt to improvise political philosophies spouted by the "jet set banking class". It's been over 30 years now that certain regions have been the pet recipients of "foreign assistance", hence the cry of "mo' mony" rings hollow. Perhaps a solution can only be found through an old "imperialist" mean: send out gunboats to seize tariff ports and install supervisors over the local treasuries? That should go a long way to trim the fat from the politicos that have created this situation. Oh wait, it will just provide a new excuse: we are being exploited.


Edited by drgonzaga - 10 Dec 2009 at 04:43
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Styrbiorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Dec 2009 at 00:34

Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Of course they can. Just look at the representants from Africa in the Copenhagen meeting, they are quite literate, and more educated than most ordinary people in both Chile and Sweden.


To me it seems like they are merely demanding more money for free as well as instant access to all technological advancements of Asian and Western companies. There are words describing that, but neither intelligent nor educated is any of them.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Dec 2009 at 00:50
Originally posted by Styrbiorn Styrbiorn wrote:

...To me it seems like they are merely demanding more money for free as well as instant access to all technological advancements of Asian and Western companies. There are words describing that, but neither intelligent nor educated is any of them.
 
Do you mean that Africa is a whole continent on Welfare? ConfusedConfused
 
Well, Kaddafi already said that, anyways.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Panther Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Dec 2009 at 01:33
Sometimes i wonder if the African states would be allowed to industrialize if it weren't for the constant interference of the outside world? As it stands, me thinks the many African state governments are the ones who willingly accept the world's charity at the expense of the supposedly governed populace and the economies.

It seems that is where they have put the emphasis on power is within the size of the free imports and it's distribution as the states see fit to the masses?  Many rebellions in these anarchical states resent such supposed compassion because they are not in control of the goods because they cannot score any brownie points with the people? Leaving many of the people to live and  starve in an unimaginable nightmare scenario of a merry-go-round and with only a few African intellectuals that are heard crying out for more trade with much less handouts! This is a prime example of bailouts gone awry! So i wonder, if this is indeed the problem, then i wonder how do we stop it? Should the contributing nations set goals and conditions on such charities for starters? A topic for a different thread.

No the topic of the thread was meant too highlight and discuss a very highly unusual and mind boggling practice, much like any other weird practices that can be found in any state on this earth. For instance, here in the US we have our fair share of some unusual practices. Like for starters, snake handling, which i think is a very weird practice too say the least. Not that it i mean it to be weird human practice in and of itself, other cultures have something similar; But this is a very highly unusual for a supposedly christian church, AFAIK? That is just something that most christian churches of the world just do not offer! How in the world does stuff like this even begin?


Edited by Panther - 10 Dec 2009 at 01:37
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Dec 2009 at 11:09
Indeed. Human sacrifices are still practised sometimes in poor places in the Andes. Illegally, of course, but that happens. Even people right in the middle of Western Civilization sometimes get weird. just remember the cannibal of Germany, or the lunatics that suicide in mass to catch the flying saucer that followed the Hale-Bopp comet. Even in here, not long ago, a disturbed man, follower of satanic practises killed a priest at the middle of a mass, in the main cathedral.
 
Nope, the point is that in Africa these practises are not exceptional at all but massive. The South African police knows about them. And the point is simple: Africa need mass education. If that land is going to get out someday from the disaster it is time they change, and fast.
 
 
From The Times
October 4, 2003

'Magic medicine' murders bedevil South Africa

Rogue traditional traders are still using human body parts to increase their potions' power

WHEN police arrested six people outside a squatter camp in Bloemfontein, they were horrified to find that a bag the six had with them contained the head, heart, hands, feet, genitals and liver of a man in his twenties.

The arrests last month, which came after a tip-off from terrified residents that the six were allegedly hawking human body parts, turned the spotlight on the darkest of South African practices.

The police are convinced that the body parts were to be sold to a sangoma — a traditional healer — to make muti, meaning medicine. Some Africans believe that muti made with human body parts is the most potent of all.

The four men and two women made a pre-trial appearance yesterday. During two previous court appearances hundreds of people demonstrated outside the court, threatening to kill the accused if they were released on bail. All six are now being held in police cells for fear they would be murdered by fellow inmates if they were kept in the local Grootvlei prison.

Abel Tubane, a protester outraged that the six are accused of committing murder to make money from selling body parts, said: “You can sell oranges or apples to earn a living.”

Thandi Gulwa, another protester, was enraged that the accused could insult African traditions in such a way. “We use herbs to be cured, not human flesh,” she said.

But although muti killing is a taboo subject, the Bloemfontein case is far from being an isolated incident. Two men and a woman recently appeared in Khayekutsha Magistrates’ Court, outside Cape Town, charged with killing a baby and frying her intestines to make muti to help them to find a job.

At about the same time, a young woman’s head was found floating in a Johannesburg reservoir, fuelling speculation that she had been killed for her body parts. Last year police arrested a man after he was caught trying to sell a head for £900 for use in traditional medicine.

The South African police force boasts the world’s only specialised muti murder investigation force. Gerard Labuschagne, who is in charge of it, believes that as many as 300 such murders are committed every year.

“Apart from a handful of high-profile cases, most muti murders go unreported,” Dr Labuschagne said. “They happen in South Africa fairly regularly, at least once a month. But for many police officers they are nothing unusual. They are just treated as another murder, so there are a lot of muti-related killings out there that never come to our attention.”

Nor are they restricted to South Africa. In 2001 the torso of a boy was found in the Thames in London. Police arrested 21 people as part of the investigation into what they believe was a ritual killing.

For centuries herbs, roots, powders, tree bark, skins and animal entrails have been the stock in trade of Africa’s traditional healers.

Dismissed as “backward and primitive” during the colonial and apartheid eras, African traditional medicine is undergoing something of a renaissance with Western scientists eager to examine traditional herbal remedies in their quest for new drugs.

Sangomas provide basic healthcare for an estimated

80 per cent of South Africa’s 45 million people, most of whom cannot afford Western-style medical care, and who use muti in the same way Westerners use homoeopathic medicine.

But the sangomas also specialise in making potions for everything from the removal of evil spirits to increasing income, bringing good luck, boosting fertility, passing examinations and preventing cars from being hijacked.

Most of the 300,000 sangomas in South Africa publicly condemn the use of human body parts. But the belief that the parts make exceptionally powerful muti frequently tempts rogue sangomas.

The murders are often carried out to order. A traditional healer will describe what body parts are needed — testicles for virility, breasts for luck or a tongue to smooth the path to a girl’s heart — and how they are to be harvested. The parts are obtained while the victim is alive, supposedly to increase their potency.

“The victims usually just happen to fit the bill at the time,” Dr Labuschagne said. “The practice is shrouded in secrecy. These people do not talk about what they do, and there is a reluctance to report muti murders for fear of being cursed by the sangoma.”

Dr Labuschagne doubts that the practice will ever be stamped out. “It’s part of the cultural belief system. It will always be around. Like murder and rape, muti killings will always be with us to a greater or lesser degree,” he said.

Although muti murders are easy to identify, they are extremely difficult to solve, Dr Labuschagne said. “The biggest problem is that they are what we call ‘stranger murders’. Identifying the victim does not help you. Apart from the body parts, there is no reason why the victim was chosen, and nothing to connect the victim to the murderer.

“Muti murder as part of traditional African beliefs has been practised for centuries. With the arrival of Western criminal justice systems such practices became illegal. The problem faced by law enforcement agencies is that little is known about muti murder.”

MUTI AND THE BODY

  • Severed hands: buried under the door of a shop or business these would bring customers to the premises, making the owner wealthy
  • Breasts: widely regarded in African traditional culture as the source of “mother luck”, which would be used in magic potions to bring good fortune
  • Genitals: both male and female are in demand, used by sangomas to boost virility in men and fertility in women
  • Adam’s apple: would be used to silence a witness who was intending to testify against a sangoma’s client in court
  • Skull: used to protect members of one tribe from another by burying the enemy victim’s head in the tribe’s village
  • Eyes: supposed to confer far-sightedness
  • Tongue: used to smooth the path to a girl’s heart for a prospective lover
  • Body fat: usually taken from the stomach, the fat is regarded by some people, especially the Venda, as the source of a good harvest
  • Sperm and urine: also widely seen as a source of good luck
  • Atlas bone: regarded as powerful muti because of the belief that the circulatory and nervous systems run through it
  • Brains: would help to confer intelligence


Edited by pinguin - 10 Dec 2009 at 11:17
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 15:08
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

[
Perhaps a solution can only be found through an old "imperialist" mean: send out gunboats to seize tariff ports and install supervisors over the local treasuries? That should go a long way to trim the fat from the politicos that have created this situation. Oh wait, it will just provide a new excuse: we are being exploited.


Hmm, it seems that the haydays of the gunboats are over. They can not even effectively protect merchant ships against Somailian pirates, eventhough several countries have sent their ships to the area (also Sweden has sent ships there).




Edited by Carcharodon - 11 Dec 2009 at 16:38
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 15:22
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

I
 
And the point is simple: Africa need mass education. If that land is going to get out someday from the disaster it is time they change, and fast.
 


Africa is not ONE country, it is a continent with many countries, with different cultures and different socio economic circumstances..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Styrbiorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 15:49
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

I
 
And the point is simple: Africa need mass education. If that land is going to get out someday from the disaster it is time they change, and fast.
 


Africa is not ONE country, it is a continent with many countries, with different cultures and different socio economic circumstances..

And which country in Africa (or in the rest of the world for that matter) does not need education?


Edited by Styrbiorn - 11 Dec 2009 at 15:49
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 15:54
Originally posted by Styrbiorn Styrbiorn wrote:

Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

I
 
And the point is simple: Africa need mass education. If that land is going to get out someday from the disaster it is time they change, and fast.
 


Africa is not ONE country, it is a continent with many countries, with different cultures and different socio economic circumstances..

And which country in Africa (or in the rest of the world for that matter) does not need education?


All countries benefit from education. I just pointed out the fact that it is hard to treat Africa as a whole, politically, culturally, economically and also concerning education. The situation is more diverse than that.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Dec 2009 at 01:22
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

...Africa is not ONE country, it is a continent with many countries, with different cultures and different socio economic circumstances..
 
Everybody knows that. But they share most of the same problems. I know North Africa has a different situation, though.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Dec 2009 at 01:25
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

...
All countries benefit from education. I just pointed out the fact that it is hard to treat Africa as a whole, politically, culturally, economically and also concerning education. The situation is more diverse than that.
 
I don't know why you, Carcha, always try to hide the sun with a finger. Everybody knowns that, too. But everybody here also know the big problems that Africa has today. One of this is the regional lowest level of education of all the world. That's a fact. Something to be fixed, but you can't fix something denied.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Dec 2009 at 15:55
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

[
Perhaps a solution can only be found through an old "imperialist" mean: send out gunboats to seize tariff ports and install supervisors over the local treasuries? That should go a long way to trim the fat from the politicos that have created this situation. Oh wait, it will just provide a new excuse: we are being exploited.


Hmm, it seems that the haydays of the gunboats are over. They can not even effectively protect merchant ships against Somailian pirates, eventhough several countries have sent their ships to the area (also Sweden has sent ships there).


 
It's not the "gunboats" that are powerless it's the politicians who are are all both clueless and gutless while they lack the balls to employ their weaponry effectively.  That is the  trump card all of these sociopathic groups possess: They know they confront dumb-asses that will not excise the cancer for fear they'll kill some cells. Perhaps now, with the sudden "rediscovery" of Just War Theory by a hawk in chicken feathers we will get the Europa hen house clucking in unison.Ermm
 
PS: Ain't the paens of punditry perfect for pushing the point.Censored


Edited by drgonzaga - 12 Dec 2009 at 15:57
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