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Did Anzacs won the Battle Of Gallipoli?

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Robohistorian View Drop Down
Janissary
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robohistorian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Jun 2016 at 23:22
As long as you dont dare to read my book, you can keep assuring yourselves endlessly what you know is right... It is all about your courage. You know very well that I have something serious in the book and this scares you because as toyomotor says it must be scary to learn something opposite to what you have been taught. I will not try to persuade you in this forum, I already did it in my book hundred percent...:)
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toyomotor View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Jun 2016 at 02:27
Originally posted by caldrail caldrail wrote:

Nothing unusual there. The joke in 1940 was that Churchill wanted to fight to the last American. But then he was as manipulative of British assets as well, so there's no real need for any grievance. In any case, Churchill, for all his leadership in WW2, was never popular. Indeed, he narrowly avoided being pushed aside in favour of Lord Halifax before becoming British Prime Minister of the emergency coalition, survived at least one vote of no-confidence, suffered a measure of public disapproval of his office, and was voted out as soon as the war ended.

In 1940 you say? America didn't enter the war until 1941, and had Japan not attacked the US, there is no evidence that it would have entered the war at all. Most Americans were against it.

Anyway, we've strayed from the OP again, haven't we?  LOL
It's not that I was born in Ireland,
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robohistorian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Jun 2016 at 12:12
If you do not know how Japan has been leveraged to a super power status with the efforts of western powers beginning from as early as 1919-20, you may think that it all started suddenly. 

You still wandering around the truth about the Battle of Gallipoli... Come on, dare to step into real history, it is not all that bad:)

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote caldrail Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jun 2016 at 15:51
Quote In 1940 you say? America didn't enter the war until 1941, and had Japan not attacked the US, there is no evidence that it would have entered the war at all. Most Americans were against it.

Strictly speaking this ought to be in another thread, but, Churchill was lobbying the American administration for assistance before Dec 1941.

It was indeed an intensely unpopular idea for many americans, and formed a major issue of the 1940 election in which both he and his opponent declared that americans would not be sent to Europe. Roosevelt did however support the British effort in other ways, by commercial contract, lend-lease, etc, and declared that America should be the "Arsenal of Democracy". As it happens, America profited from WW2 enormously with substantial surpluses at its end. One of the reasons that Curchill launched Operation Catapult before France fell in order to prevent Nazi capture of French naval assets was to convinmce America that Britain were not going down without a fight. Ships were boarded and interned in British harbours (there was a gunfight aboard a French submarine in which british lives were lost) and at Mer-El-Kebir the French ships were sunk at anchor after the French commander refused orders to surrender.

There was also industrial action in 1940 started by union interference to obstruct military production contracts. North American ceased work for a couple of weeks until the US Army was called in to stop the dispute. There were soldiers on the line keeping workers busy for a while.

Nonetheless Churchill's diplomacy managed to bring the Americans toward the relationship we now enjoy.
http://www.unrv.com/forum/blog/31-caldrails-blog/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robohistorian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jun 2016 at 16:04
Hi guys, e-book version is published now. Check it out...

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=the+hidden+victory+of+anzacs
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jun 2016 at 14:01
All I know about the Gallipoli campaign is that the Murdoch family has been mouthing off from the sidelines ever since.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robohistorian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jun 2016 at 16:51
This is a very good point. They were always involved. But because they are still around, I dont use their name. İf you read the book, you will see how badly the realities of history twisted..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jun 2016 at 03:20
from Wiki
Quote The peninsula forms the northern bank of the Dardanelles, a strait that provided a sea route to theRussian Empire, one of the Allied powers during the war. Intending to secure it, Russia's allies Britain and France launched a naval attack followed by anamphibious landing on the peninsula, with the aim of capturing the Ottoman capital of Constantinople (modern Istanbul).[6] The naval attack was repelled and after eight months' fighting, with many casualties on both sides, the land campaign was abandoned and the invasion force was withdrawn to Egypt.

The campaign was one of the greatest Ottoman victories during the war.

There is a host of authoratative works on this subject, all pretty much saying the same thing. The ANZACS did not win at Gallipoli.

Among what was referred to above as the invasion force, was the Third Light Horse Regiment, of which my g-g-uncle was a member. This regiment was made up of Tasmanians and South Australians, from memory.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robohistorian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jun 2016 at 11:05
Hi Toyomotor... I advise you to approach anything authoratative in science with great caution. Because science requires evidence and when evidences clash only authority is what remains as truth... You can read a sample of the book in this link... And decide whether I am up to something or not. It is easy and free... But I assure you if you ever read the sample, you definitely buy the book, haha:)

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Burak_Turna_The_Hidden_Victory_Of_Anzacs?id=Pr5pDAAAQBAJ&hl=en


Edited by Robohistorian - 19 Jun 2016 at 11:06
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jun 2016 at 12:23
Originally posted by Robohistorian Robohistorian wrote:

Hi Toyomotor... I advise you to approach anything authoratative in science with great caution. Because science requires evidence and when evidences clash only authority is what remains as truth... You can read a sample of the book in this link... And decide whether I am up to something or not. It is easy and free... But I assure you if you ever read the sample, you definitely buy the book, haha:)

https://play.google.com/store/books/details/Burak_Turna_The_Hidden_Victory_Of_Anzacs?id=Pr5pDAAAQBAJ&hl=en
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thanks for the offer Robo, but I'm satisfied with what I've learned about Gallipoli and that it's as true as we'll get.

By all means disagree, that's your entitlement, and please don't think that I'm being critical of the ANZACS, because I'm not-quite the contrary.

The evidence for my view is contained in numerous historical texts and within the living memory (in the past) of those who were fortunate enough to survive.

The British attitude to the "Colonials" being expendable was still evident during WW2, when Churchill wanted to keep the ANZACS, particularly the Australians in North Africa, notwithstanding the fact that our own shores were being attacked on two fronts by the Japanese. Our Prime Minister of the time brought the troops home, where they were sent to New Guinea, the Marshall Islands etc where they successfully repelled the Japanese invaders. The point being that Churchill was content for Australia to fall while England, and it's interests were bolstered by ANZAC troops.





It's not that I was born in Ireland,
It's the Ireland that was born in me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Robohistorian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jun 2016 at 16:08
Come on, Toyomotor, this is not about ideology or being against or something. This is about truth... Just take a look at the book. There is a free sample, just read that:)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote caldrail Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Jun 2016 at 18:06
Quote The British attitude to the "Colonials" being expendable

That simply isn't true. Churchill was very manipulative of his resources in war, but that was not the prevailing attitude of British nationals and still isn't. Expending troops on a national scale would be a ridiculous policy and self-defeating strategically. Churchill was a risk taker, certainly, but then successful war commanders often are. I really don't understand why the antipodeans have this idea. After all, the British in WW1 were no less exposed to losses than Australia or New Zealand, and in many respects, probably more so. That the empire/commonwealth forces were used in campaigns that failed is not evidence of an 'expendable' policy.
http://www.unrv.com/forum/blog/31-caldrails-blog/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jun 2016 at 09:07
Originally posted by caldrail caldrail wrote:

Quote The British attitude to the "Colonials" being expendable

I really don't understand why the antipodeans have this idea.


News Corpse.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jun 2016 at 05:33
And the dirty old rat has had his revenge on the English who he has despised since his humiliating days at Oxford.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AnchoriticSybarite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 May 2017 at 09:28
Didn't you get laughed off of another forum for this same topic.

At some point idiocy get tiresome.
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