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Eurasia

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    Posted: 01 May 2014 at 10:55

Eurasia is the combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia, with the term being a portmanteau of its two constituents. Located primarily in the Northern and Eastern Hemispheres, it is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean on the west, the Pacific Ocean to the east, the Arctic Ocean on the north, and by Africa, the Mediterranean Sea, the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean to the south. 

The division between Europe and Asia as two different continents is a historical and cultural construct, with no clear physical separation between them; thus, in some parts of the world, Eurasia is considered the largest of five or six continents. (From Wiki)

Many people confuse the term Eurasia or Eurasian with an area of the globe where parts of the European continent abut the Asian continent. But, as can be seen by the above, this is not so.

Similarly, the term Eurasian, while usually used to describe people with a European and Asian genetic admixture, it could also be used to describe people of either of the two continents or both-as confusing as that could become.

What's the general consensus of the forum? 

Should people of both continents be considered Eurasian?





Edited by toyomotor - 01 May 2014 at 10:57
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2014 at 11:42
Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

Eurasia is the combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia, with the term being a portmanteau of its two constituents. Located primarily in the Northern and Eastern Hemispheres, it is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean on the west, the Pacific Ocean to the east, the Arctic Ocean on the north, and by Africa, the Mediterranean Sea, the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean to the south. 

The division between Europe and Asia as two different continents is a historical and cultural construct, with no clear physical separation between them; thus, in some parts of the world, Eurasia is considered the largest of five or six continents. (From Wiki)

Many people confuse the term Eurasia or Eurasian with an area of the globe where parts of the European continent abut the Asian continent. But, as can be seen by the above, this is not so.

Similarly, the term Eurasian, while usually used to describe people with a European and Asian genetic admixture, it could also be used to describe people of either of the two continents or both-as confusing as that could become.

What's the general consensus of the forum? 

Should people of both continents be considered Eurasian?



I agree of course continental Asia and continental Euirope is one large mass of land.
OPn the other hand I see no common "identity" or anything particular in common for the pewople living there, except they walk on two. The same can be said for other continents: South Americans live on the same land mass, but can be spanish speaking, or english speaking (Guyana) or Portuguese speaking, or some native langauge.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2014 at 13:04
fantasus:

I don't believe that ethnicity or language come into it.

For the purposes of this discussion, I believe that it's more about the region of your ancestry.

If that works out to be ethnicity, then I withdraw that part of my statement.

Here's a poser for you-I am phenotypically European, with fair skin, brown hair and blue eyes.

My yDNA is D2a1b-exclusively Japanese (Ainu).

Would you describe me as European or Asian or Eurasian?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2014 at 13:45
Eurasia is a correct term like Africa or any other continent. The term Europe is just an historical construct. There is not a natural frontier between Europe and the rest of Eurasia and peoples change along any given path.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 May 2014 at 15:38
Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

fantasus:

I don't believe that ethnicity or language come into it.

For the purposes of this discussion, I believe that it's more about the region of your ancestry.

If that works out to be ethnicity, then I withdraw that part of my statement.

Here's a poser for you-I am phenotypically European, with fair skin, brown hair and blue eyes.

My yDNA is D2a1b-exclusively Japanese (Ainu).

Would you describe me as European or Asian or Eurasian?


From this descriprion it seems You have most european ancestry, though You know best.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 May 2014 at 02:27
fantasus:

Yes, just another scientific vaguery. But it does point out that people living side by side, divided only by imaginary geological or political borders, are not necessarily different. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eetion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 May 2014 at 18:42
Here is My Eurasia

Turkey,
Transcaucaus
Central Asia
Russia-Ukraine
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 03:16
Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

Here is My Eurasia

Turkey,
Transcaucaus
Central Asia
Russia-Ukraine

So, you completely ignore the Asian countries?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 09:02
Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

Here is My Eurasia

Turkey,
Transcaucaus
Central Asia
Russia-Ukraine
For any debate it is preferable to have at least a wide agreement if not consensus about what is discussed. To discuss "my Eurasia" vs. "Your Eurasia", is to risk ending up in a wilderness.
So, in a way I think of some entirely different names, if that would mean more precision.
Or it could be numbers, though perhaps somebody would dislike that, if they think of numbers as "rank". Or it could be the alfabet, where the biggest continents are put first
Then "A" would represent the landmasses of Europe and Asia, "B" Africa, "C" North America including Mexico to somewhere in Central America or to Panama, "D", South America, "F" Antarctica (at least as long as the massive Ice has not melted, and finally "G" Australia. Big Islands as Greenland, New Guinea, Borneo, Baffin Island and Madagascar could perhaps as well be seen as "microcontinents", but are conventionally called "islands". So perhaps they should remain so.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 12:21
Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:

Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

Here is My Eurasia

Turkey,
Transcaucaus
Central Asia
Russia-Ukraine
For any debate it is preferable to have at least a wide agreement if not consensus about what is discussed. To discuss "my Eurasia" vs. "Your Eurasia", is to risk ending up in a wilderness.
So, in a way I think of some entirely different names, if that would mean more precision.
Or it could be numbers, though perhaps somebody would dislike that, if they think of numbers as "rank". Or it could be the alfabet, where the biggest continents are put first
Then "A" would represent the landmasses of Europe and Asia, "B" Africa, "C" North America including Mexico to somewhere in Central America or to Panama, "D", South America, "F" Antarctica (at least as long as the massive Ice has not melted, and finally "G" Australia. Big Islands as Greenland, New Guinea, Borneo, Baffin Island and Madagascar could perhaps as well be seen as "microcontinents", but are conventionally called "islands". So perhaps they should remain so.



What I'm saying is that the list you posted is of European Countries only.

Surely Eurasia must include the contiguous countries bordering Europe, and in Asia.

I don't see how we can have "your Eurasia" and "my Eurasia".

Maps clearly show what countries are considered to be Eurasia.

But the OP was a bit fanciful anyway. It's not really worth arguing about, I just wanted the views of other members.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eetion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 13:50
Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:

Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

Here is My Eurasia

Turkey,
Transcaucaus
Central Asia
Russia-Ukraine


To discuss "my Eurasia" vs. "Your Eurasia", is to risk ending up in a wilderness.


Of Course, it will be wilderness, because it is not something which you can measure. The border of Euraisa is just up to you

Example Which map is true for Middle East?
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~sarhaus/MapsAndTimelines/Fall2007/Sulaka/The%20Middle%20East%20Peace%20Conference-Madrid_files/middle-east-map.jpg

http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/menewzz.gif

There is just one Eurasia which can be explain by physical science. It is Eurasia Plate
http://www.zetatalk.com/info/tinfo05s.gif





Edited by Eetion - 03 May 2014 at 13:51
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 14:11
Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:

Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

Here is My Eurasia

Turkey,
Transcaucaus
Central Asia
Russia-Ukraine
For any debate it is preferable to have at least a wide agreement if not consensus about what is discussed. To discuss "my Eurasia" vs. "Your Eurasia", is to risk ending up in a wilderness.
So, in a way I think of some entirely different names, if that would mean more precision.
Or it could be numbers, though perhaps somebody would dislike that, if they think of numbers as "rank". Or it could be the alfabet, where the biggest continents are put first
Then "A" would represent the landmasses of Europe and Asia, "B" Africa, "C" North America including Mexico to somewhere in Central America or to Panama, "D", South America, "F" Antarctica (at least as long as the massive Ice has not melted, and finally "G" Australia. Big Islands as Greenland, New Guinea, Borneo, Baffin Island and Madagascar could perhaps as well be seen as "microcontinents", but are conventionally called "islands". So perhaps they should remain so.



What I'm saying is that the list you posted is of European Countries only.

Surely Eurasia must include the contiguous countries bordering Europe, and in Asia.

I don't see how we can have "your Eurasia" and "my Eurasia".

Maps clearly show what countries are considered to be Eurasia.

But the OP was a bit fanciful anyway. It's not really worth arguing about, I just wanted the views of other members.


Why quote me, when i don´t mention any countries, European or not,  at all? But what Eetion mentions is in fact more Asian than European countries. Central asia is purely Asian(!), turkey is mainly as well as transcaucasus. Russia too if we look at territory, though most of its population lives west of the Urals, Only ukraine is purely European.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 14:21
Eetion: I do not see this as so much a question about what is for all "true", as a question about what we casn agree upon, and what kinds of division may be made according to some simple principles.
 The principle could be land naturally surrounded by seawater (except for extremely short part of overall coastline, as at the Suez or istmus of Panama). a definition without any regard for culture, history, people.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 14:55
As a very basic principle, I would have thought that the countries of Europe and Asia, where they are separated only by a political border, and perhaps a physical border, would have formed Eurasia.

Genetically it seems much simpler, a European/Asian admixture would result in a Eurasian person.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eetion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 16:38
Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:

Eetion: I do not see this as so much a question about what is for all "true", as a question about what we casn agree upon, and what kinds of division may be made according to some simple principles.


People can agree on just the universal truths, because just they are not relative.

Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:


The principle could be land naturally surrounded by seawater (except for extremely short part of overall coastline, as at the Suez or istmus of Panama). a definition without any regard for culture, history, people.


That is just a primary school information for the children and help them to understand world geography, so it ingores many things just make every things easy to understand and even I am not talking about how eurocentiric is this opinion. We know that Hippocrates believes many wrong things which don't use in current medice so why I should expect the opinions of people of that age without any questioning.

Have you ever think that there is no continent as Europe? There is just Asia and Europe is one of its peninsulas as Arab peninsula and Indian peninsula










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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 17:55
Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:

Eetion: I do not see this as so much a question about what is for all "true", as a question about what we casn agree upon, and what kinds of division may be made according to some simple principles.


People can agree on just the universal truths, because just they are not relative.

Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:


The principle could be land naturally surrounded by seawater (except for extremely short part of overall coastline, as at the Suez or istmus of Panama). a definition without any regard for culture, history, people.


That is just a primary school information for the children and help them to understand world geography, so it ingores many things just make every things easy to understand and even I am not talking about how eurocentiric is this opinion. We know that Hippocrates believes many wrong things which don't use in current medice so why I should expect the opinions of people of that age without any questioning.

Have you ever think that there is no continent as Europe? There is just Asia and Europe is one of its peninsulas as Arab peninsula and Indian peninsula


Did You read what I wrote at all? If so, I don´t understand You write about "eurocentric", since it has no relation with it whatsoever (on the other hand, if it did, I find so called "Eurocentricism" not as "bad" as many others seems to do). According to "my" definition, even the idea of an European continent is abolished - merging it with Asia to "Eurasia", or "A" or whatever You want(so in a way I already agreed Europe is a peninsula on the larger continent of "Asia", but it seems You did not notice).
I agree with you on one point: It is not about "universal truth", but has to do with simplicity, and also to find a "reasonable" defition that can act as a tool to get insigths.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eetion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 20:25
Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:


Did You read what I wrote at all? If so, I don´t understand You write about "eurocentric", since it has no relation with it whatsoever (on the other hand, if it did, I find so called "Eurocentricism" not as "bad" as many others seems to do). According to "my" definition, even the idea of an European continent is abolished - merging it with Asia to "Eurasia", or "A" or whatever You want(so in a way I already agreed Europe is a peninsula on the larger continent of "Asia", but it seems You did not notice).
I agree with you on one point: It is not about "universal truth", but has to do with simplicity, and also to find a "reasonable" defition that can act as a tool to get insigths.


This division doesn't belongs to ancient greeks
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9f/Herodotus5m1.jpg

about eurocentric http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/Eurocentric

I am not saying, it is bad or good. Accutally, I love to hear them. I mean ideas from different culture, different time about same thing.

The problem is that I don't except one side opinion as reasonable. 
 



 

 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 21:10
Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

 

This division doesn't belongs to ancient greeks
correct. the greeks could not possibly have but vague ideas about the geography of most of the earth.
 
Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

 

about eurocentric http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/Eurocentric
 I thought it better to skip any cultural influence upon definition of continent, looking alone at geography.

Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

 

I am not saying, it is bad or good. Accutally, I love to hear them. I mean ideas from different culture, different time about same thing.

The problem is that I don't except one side opinion as reasonable. 
 
 
there seems to be no universal consensus about what is a "continent", so in a way we are "free" to choose. But on the other hand some choices may be more "natural" than others. And i frankly don´t understand why putting Turkey, Central Asia, Transcaucasia and Russia/Ukraine together under the label "Eurasia".
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2014 at 23:36
Eurasia+Africa is actually a megacontinent or "world" that you can cross from South Africa to China just by walking. The other worlds would be Australia and the Americas. From the historical point of view, the civilizations of Eurasia and the Mediterranean developed in parallel and influenced each other, so they should be studied together. Come on. Even Pythagoras was Phoenician Confused.

Historically "Western" civilization was not European, and Egyptian was not African, and Phoenician was not Asian. All of them were Mediterranean Sea's civilization. It is only in the Middle Ages that locals invented the concept of Europe as a distinct entity (driven by the idea they were the chosen people of Christianity), forgetting the long historical links with the ancient Mediterranean peoples of Asia (Arabs, Jews) and north Africa (Berbers).


Edited by pinguin - 03 May 2014 at 23:40
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2014 at 05:05
Pinguin:

Pythagoras a Phoenician?

Not according to a whole host of experts, including Stanford University.

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/pythagoras/


Pythagoras
First published Wed Feb 23, 2005; substantive revision Mon Aug 8, 2011

Pythagoras, one of the most famous and controversial ancient Greek philosophers, lived from ca. 570 to ca. 490 BCE. He spent his early years on the island of Samos, off the coast of modern Turkey. At the age of forty, however, he emigrated to the city of Croton in southern Italy and most of his philosophical activity occurred there. Pythagoras wrote nothing, nor were there any detailed accounts of his thought written by contemporaries. By the first centuries BCE, moreover, it became fashionable to present Pythagoras in a largely unhistorical fashion as a semi-divine figure, who originated all that was true in the Greek philosophical tradition, including many of Plato's and Aristotle's mature ideas. A number of treatises were forged in the name of Pythagoras and other Pythagoreans in order to support this view.


Where do you get these gems of psuedo knowledge from?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2014 at 05:07
Let's be precise. Pythagoras father was a Phoenician immigrant to Samos.
Pythagoras was born on the island of Samos in 568 BC to a Phoenician merchant from Tyre called Mnesarchus. His mother was greek.

http://phoenicia.org/pythagoras.html



Edited by pinguin - 04 May 2014 at 05:09
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2014 at 05:18
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Let's be precise. Pythagoras father was a Phoenician immigrant to Samos.
Pythagoras was born on the island of Samos in 568 BC to a Phoenician merchant from Tyre called Mnesarchus. His mother was greek.

http://phoenicia.org/pythagoras.html


OK, I won't argue with you on this point, except to ask, "If Pythagoras was born on a Greek Island, would he not have been Greek by nationality, but ethnically half Phoenician?"

But why split hairs?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2014 at 06:13
Pythagoras is an excellent example of the influence of West Asia in the Western culture. His father was a man from Tyre, and I could bet something of the culture of Phoenicians influenced him, particularly knowledge of mathematics and mysticism. The middle East was also the origin of the Greek Alphabet, a derivation of Phoenician script.
This example shows that the artificial historical construct of Europe is not sustainable. Europe was a region of continuous immigration, and even the Indo-european languages came with outsiders. Perhaps the only ancient Europeans in Europe are Basques and other ancient peoples that don't even speak an Indo-european language.


Edited by pinguin - 04 May 2014 at 06:14
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2014 at 06:26
I wonder who the "expert" was who drew lines on the map to decide where continental borders were.
 
As someone pointed out, Africa, Europe and Asia are contiguous. I won't even consider the Indian "Sub-Continent".
 
So, realistically, as large land masses go, there is the large "northern land" of Africa, Europe and Asia as one entity, the Americas as another, and Australia as the third.
 
For the purposes of this post, I've left the Arctic and Antactic out.
 
The continents don't even align with the Tectonic Plates.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eetion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2014 at 20:19
Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:

 I thought it better to skip any cultural influence upon definition of continent, looking alone at geography.


I definately agree with you

 
[/QUOTE] there seems to be no universal consensus about what is a "continent", so in a way we are "free" to choose. But on the other hand some choices may be more "natural" than others. And i frankly don´t understand why putting Turkey, Central Asia, Transcaucasia and Russia/Ukraine together under the label "Eurasia".
[/QUOTE]

Well firstly ,we need to think that why we are using these term such as Far East, Levant, Asia or Africa

They don't have certain border but we use them for defining  a group of countries. But using the term Eurasia won't help. Because the countries in these group(all Asian and European) doesn't have much common things.

so I think the term Euraisa should use for countries between Europe and Asia like Mediterreanean Countries between Asia and Africa



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2014 at 21:37
Originally posted by Eetion Eetion wrote:

Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:

 I thought it better to skip any cultural influence upon definition of continent, looking alone at geography.


I definately agree with you

 
there seems to be no universal consensus about what is a "continent", so in a way we are "free" to choose. But on the other hand some choices may be more "natural" than others. And i frankly don´t understand why putting Turkey, Central Asia, Transcaucasia and Russia/Ukraine together under the label "Eurasia".
[/QUOTE]

Well firstly ,we need to think that why we are using these term such as Far East, Levant, Asia or Africa

They don't have certain border but we use them for defining  a group of countries. But using the term Eurasia won't help. Because the countries in these group(all Asian and European) doesn't have much common things.

so I think the term Euraisa should use for countries between Europe and Asia like Mediterreanean Countries between Asia and Africa



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I agree the countries in "Eurasia" does not have that much in common, except being roughly on the same continuous land mass. On the other hand: "Continents" or "supercontinents" should be just one level of division (approximately "world-  or super-islands" if You please), that could be further ub-divided, into smaller regions. So it should not necessarily mean they have anything else in common. Divisions based upon "commonality" may end up in endless discussions and questioning about exactly what that "commonality" is. Even what is "Europe" or any european region may be disputed. But then we have those "approximate supersized islands" and, see: Some of them at leastm, like Africa and Australia seems wonderfully simply surrounded by sea, so there really does not need to be that much questioning or dispute.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2014 at 02:51
But we use terms like Latin America, where countries have not much in common either. What would be in common, for instance, between Haiti and Argentina? Or between Guatemala and Brazil? Or between Belize and Paraguay? A lot less that what Syria and Greece or China and Russia had in common.

Besides, usually people talks about "Africa" and , again, what could be in common between a Berber country like Libya or Morocco with a place like Nigeria or Mozambique? Nothing at all. But people insist to call it a "continent".

And yes, I agree the notion of continent needs a revision.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2014 at 03:19
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

But we use terms like Latin America, where countries have not much in common either. What would be in common, for instance, between Haiti and Argentina? Or between Guatemala and Brazil? Or between Belize and Paraguay? A lot less that what Syria and Greece or China and Russia had in common.

Besides, usually people talks about "Africa" and , again, what could be in common between a Berber country like Libya or Morocco with a place like Nigeria or Mozambique? Nothing at all. But people insist to call it a "continent".

And yes, I agree the notion of continent needs a revision.


 
I don't really see the need to revise what we now call continents. Perhaps we could redefine the word.
 
But as the bird said, within what we call continents, there are many differences between the occupants.
 
I think there many other more important issues to consider.
 
 
 
 
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It's the Ireland that was born in me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Eetion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2014 at 18:27
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

But we use terms like Latin America, where countries have not much in common either. What would be in common, for instance, between Haiti and Argentina? Or between Guatemala and Brazil? Or between Belize and Paraguay?


It is not to hard to find the similarites

If I said WEST, you can think North America(without Mexica) and West Europe(now all EU) so it is a changeable thing. But the term West is similar with Latin America

Similarties become much when you focus on them

Afro-Eurasia
Africa
North Africa
Maghreb



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 May 2014 at 02:16
North America is similar to Western Europe? I doubt it. Perhaps to Britain, with all the exceptions you could find.
And in Latin America the differences among countries are huge. If you think otherwise is because you don't know the region.
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