| FORUM | ARCHIVE |                    | TOTAL QUIZ RESULT |


  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Europeans: what they brought to the Americas?
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login


Welcome stranger, click here to read about some of the great benefits of registering for a free account with us and joining us in our global online community.


Europeans: what they brought to the Americas?

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123>
Author
 Rating: Topic Rating: 1 Votes, Average 5.00  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Europeans: what they brought to the Americas?
    Posted: 30 Jul 2011 at 13:21
What the Europeans brought to the Americas?

If somebody says they brought civilization, religion or writing it would be wrong. Those things existed already in the Americas. In the New World there were ships, bridges, stonework, metalurgy, poetry, music, empires, accounting, bells, paper, textiles, toothfillings, concave mirrors for lighting fires, and even the zero and the golden rate were known.

So, the question is, what really brought the Europeans to the Americas that was something new, and that contributed to development? I have a list on here, and let's see if you can make it longer.

(1) New vegetables, particularly wheat and rice, that made food more available. Lettuces, onions, cabbage, grapes, olives and many other produce came from the old world as well.

(2) New animals that revolutionazed farming and transport: horse, the mule (the 4WD of ancient times) which worked harder than a llama, the cow that provided lot of meat and milk (animal milk was unknown in the Americas, together with cheese, yogurt and derivatives), the sheep, that made fiber production cheaper, the goat that produced milk and meat, and the ox which was a heavy duty animal for works that requiered force.

(3) Iron. That was the single metal that impacted the most in the Americas.

(4) Cheap paper. The European methods copied from the Chinese allowed for mass producing paper. In the Americas there was amate paper in some regions of Mesoamerica, but it was produced in small scale.

(5) The alphabet. This method of writing was a lot superior to the memorizing devices of the Iroquos wampun, or the Inca quipus, and it was also a lot simpler than Maya writing. The phonetic alphabet also allowed to transcribe native languages and therefore to record theirs tought early on.

(6) The arch. The single more important invention introduced by the Europeans in architecture it was the arch, unknown in the Americas. This allowed in colonial times the development of aqueducts following the roman model.

(7) The galeon. In the Americas there were large dugout canoes and balsa rafts driven by sails, but there wasn't anything such as the European ship technology, with complex sails and rudders. A technology that took thousand of years to develop in Eurasia and that was unknown in the Americas.

(8) The wheel. The wheel was known in Mesoamerica, but was used only in toys. The Europeans spread the use of the wheel in transport.

(9) Codified law. It was unknown in the Americas.

(10) Gunpowder. Unknown in the Americas, changed war.
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Flipper View Drop Down
Caliph
Caliph
Avatar

Joined: 23 Apr 2006
Location: Anatolia&Balkan
Status: Offline
Points: 2798
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jul 2011 at 18:18
I don't think i have much to add. Basically, it was more advanced technology that the existing one that was imported.
FΑΝΑΚΤΟΥ ΜΙΔΑ ΓΟΝΟΣ
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2011 at 00:36
Yes, Europeans had more technology, but it wasn't as advanced as today at all. Europe at the 15th century wasn't really a technological society as we imagine now, but a Middle Ages society with all its virtues and backwardeness.
Of course, things such as watches, trigonometry and printing may have been thousand of years ahead of what was known in the Americas, and in those case the cultural impact on natives would have been shocking.
By the way, Europeans also brought certain key institutions, such as the university. The first in the New World was founded in Hispaniola, today's Dominican Republic.




Edited by pinguin - 31 Jul 2011 at 00:37
Back to Top
SPQR View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 31 Oct 2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 917
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote SPQR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2011 at 17:59
Yeah I mean Europeans weren't doing much in the late 1400's 1500's at all besides a little thing called the Renaissance.
Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind.

- Albert Einstein
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2011 at 18:25
Interesting oppinion but Italians stayed in Italy. Other Europeans started the colonization of the Americas with Middle Ages technology. At least at the beginnings.
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2011 at 19:10
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Interesting oppinion but Italians stayed in Italy.
If all the Italians had stayed in Italy, America wouldn't be called America.


Edited by gcle2003 - 31 Jul 2011 at 19:11
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jul 2011 at 20:29
Sure. Parts of Italy were sort of Spanish colonies at the time. But don't forget a German called it that way.
Back to Top
SPQR View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 31 Oct 2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 917
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote SPQR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 00:55
again you fail to see what I mean when I hinted at Renaissance. It did not just affect Italy, it affected all of Europe and created the Northern Renaissance. If you want I can list all of the contributions that the Renaissance has made to this world. I am sure most members here know what I am talking about so there is no reason to rant.
Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind.

- Albert Einstein
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 01:15
Fellow. "Renaissance" is just  construct developed by Italians to make people believe something interesting happened in arts there at the 16th century that changed the world.
In fact, it forgets the between that 12th and the 14th century there was a more interesting technological and intellectual "renaissance" in Europe that was the basis of the age of discovery and the scientific and industrial revolution. For instance, the Mechanical clock, the rudder and Alhazen's optics appeared together with the Divine Comedy, Roger Bacon works and the Mio Cid, lot of time before a buch of lazy Italian artist sough fame in Italy.

Finally, it was the Age of Discovery what changed the world and produced subproducts such as the "renaissance"


Edited by pinguin - 01 Aug 2011 at 01:17
Back to Top
Harburs View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar
Chieftain

Joined: 10 Feb 2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 3148
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Harburs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 01:22
Democracy!Big smile! Amerindians used to beat their wives and treat them like slavesConfused, now all of them live peacefully in jungle. Please stay backward, don't make more dams and save the indigenous life style.


Edited by Harburs - 01 Aug 2011 at 01:26
"Turn yourself not away from three best things: Good Thought, Good Word, and Good Deed" Zoroaster.
Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 12:31
Then we must not forget all the negative contributions that were brought by the europeans. Many diseases that was unheard of in the precolumbian world did wreac havoc among the native populations. War in a larger scale and with new weapons did also take its toll, as slavery in a large and devastating scale. Also forced christianisation and deculturation was gifts that destroyed native lives and lifeways.
Back to Top
bagrat View Drop Down
Housecarl
Housecarl
Avatar

Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Location: Different Live
Status: Offline
Points: 42
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bagrat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 13:45
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Then we must not forget all the negative contributions that were brought by the europeans. Many diseases that was unheard of in the precolumbian world did wreac havoc among the native populations.
 
Only too true, but there is some sweet revenge!
The Americas gave the rest of the world tobacco and tomatoes, and when the final reckoning comes on the day of judgement, we'll see what the more deadly presents were, syphillis and TB, or Cigarettes and Pizzas.
 
As for Pinguin's contributions, I don't know where even to start! Life's too short to go into all the anachronistic and simply fallacious details.
Originally posted by Pinguin Pinguin wrote:

Fellow. "Renaissance" is just  construct developed by Italians to make people believe something interesting happened in arts there at the 16th century that changed the world.
In fact, it forgets the between that 12th and the 14th century there was a more interesting technological and intellectual "renaissance" in Europe that was the basis of the age of discovery and the scientific and industrial revolution. For instance, the Mechanical clock, the rudder and Alhazen's optics appeared together with the Divine Comedy, Roger Bacon works and the Mio Cid, lot of time before a buch of lazy Italian artist sough fame in Italy.

Finally, it was the Age of Discovery what changed the world and produced subproducts such as the "renaissance"
 
Renaissance was not just an artistic , invented by lazy Italians over an espresso and a fag, but
a cultural phenomenon, triggered by social and economical changes in Italy and the rest of Europe, that encompassed new directions in philosophical, scientific and political etc. thinking, and the new intellectual ideas got subsequently expressed in in the literary and visuell arts.
Ever heard of the scientific enterprises of a certain Leonardo da Vinci, another lazy Italian?
I leave the last word to the great Blackadder: "To you,..., the Renaissance was just something that happened to other people, wasn't it?"
 

 
 
Believe me: eternity in the company of Beelzebub, and all his hellish instruments of death, will be a picnic compared to five minutes with me... and this pencil...
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 14:31
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Then we must not forget all the negative contributions that were brought by the europeans. Many diseases that was unheard of in the precolumbian world did wreac havoc among the native populations. War in a larger scale and with new weapons did also take its toll, as slavery in a large and devastating scale. Also forced christianisation and deculturation was gifts that destroyed native lives and lifeways.
 
Sure. I never expected a possitive oppinion in this topic.
With respect to christianisation, remember that for many peoples it was something possitive. Christianisation meant to be integrated to the mainstream, to have access to writing and the european culture, and to for many societies it was the end of the bloody tradition of the human sacrifices.
So, don't be one sided. Christianisation also brought progress to the norse. Without the monks nobody would have wrote the sagas. Think about it.
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 19:12
Originally posted by bagrat bagrat wrote:

Renaissance was not just an artistic , invented by lazy Italians over an espresso and a fag, but
a cultural phenomenon, triggered by social and economical changes in Italy and the rest of Europe, that encompassed new directions in philosophical, scientific and political etc. thinking, and the new intellectual ideas got subsequently expressed in in the literary and visuell arts.
Ever heard of the scientific enterprises of a certain Leonardo da Vinci, another lazy Italian?
I leave the last word to the great Blackadder: "To you,..., the Renaissance was just something that happened to other people, wasn't it?"
 
 
Sure, the renaissance has quite a prestige on the artistic biassed minds. In any case, the European booming started a lot earlier, about the 12th century, when engineering techniques and new phylosophical tendencies changed the society. From that time are most of the gear Europeans brought to the Americas, such as astrolabes, clocks, firearms, ironwork, paper and the rudder. And those practical things weren't invented by Da Vinci. This later guy was a dreammer but he created very few practical things.
Back to Top
bagrat View Drop Down
Housecarl
Housecarl
Avatar

Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Location: Different Live
Status: Offline
Points: 42
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bagrat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Aug 2011 at 19:54
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

 
Sure, the renaissance has quite a prestige on the artistic biassed minds. In any case, the European booming started a lot earlier, about the 12th century, when engineering techniques and new phylosophical tendencies changed the society. From that time are most of the gear Europeans brought to the Americas, such as astrolabes, clocks, firearms, ironwork, paper and the rudder.
Indeed, that's why some historians call it the 12th century "renaissance". 
Of course, the 15th century "renaissance" didn't grow in a vacuum, but as all such periods of social, political and cultural revolutions evolved out of previous ones. Its undoubtable achievements were thus prepared by phenomena as the 12th century changes, and after a few drawbacks, finally culminated in the 15th century.
Believe me: eternity in the company of Beelzebub, and all his hellish instruments of death, will be a picnic compared to five minutes with me... and this pencil...
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Aug 2011 at 02:52
Yes, but people forgets that the renaissance was an effect of the Age of Discovery and not the other way around. The renaissance was mainly an artistic and humanistic movement, that had no much to do with the technology, which is the topic of this thread.

Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 14:29
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

 
Sure. I never expected a possitive oppinion in this topic.
With respect to christianisation, remember that for many peoples it was something possitive. Christianisation meant to be integrated to the mainstream, to have access to writing and the european culture, and to for many societies it was the end of the bloody tradition of the human sacrifices.
 
Let us not exaggerate the positive consequences of christianization. For many peoples it also meant a desintegration of their society and lifeways, it meant a weakened psychological resistance against being displaced from their land, assimilated and in some cases brought into serfdom or enslavement. Also the western civilisation brought a lot of violence in a larger scale that replaced or enlarged older feuds and conflicts.
 
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

 So, don't be one sided. Christianisation also brought progress to the norse. Without the monks nobody would have wrote the sagas. Think about it.
 
Actually writing did exist already in pre christian Scandinavia, and noone knows if the writing down of old sagas would not  sooner or later have taken place also in a pagan context.
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Aug 2011 at 18:57
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

...
Let us not exaggerate the positive consequences of christianization. For many peoples it also meant a desintegration of their society and lifeways, it meant a weakened psychological resistance against being displaced from their land, assimilated and in some cases brought into serfdom or enslavement. Also the western civilisation brought a lot of violence in a larger scale that replaced or enlarged older feuds and conflicts.


Let's not exagerate the negative consequences of Christianization. Just imagine if the Norse would have continue to be the savages of the Middle Ages forever.
 
 
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

...
Actually writing did exist already in pre christian Scandinavia, and noone knows if the writing down of old sagas would not  sooner or later have taken place also in a pagan context.


If you can call "writing" the runa scratching.... Yes, just imagine how scandinavia, the british islands and Northern Europe would be if the Norse, the Celts and the Germans wouldn't be domesticated by the Christian monks. God save St Patrick!




Edited by pinguin - 03 Aug 2011 at 18:58
Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 11:26
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Let's not exagerate the negative consequences of Christianization. Just imagine if the Norse would have continue to be the savages of the Middle Ages forever.

Unfortunately the christianisation led to the demise of whole cultures in many corners of the world (especially in your own continent) and in some cases it contributed to the extinction of whole peoples. It is not an exaggeration, it actually did happen.
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

If you can call "writing" the runa scratching....

The rune scratching had the same roots as the writings of the monks.
 
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Yes, just imagine how scandinavia, the british islands and Northern Europe would be if the Norse, the Celts and the Germans wouldn't be domesticated by the Christian monks. God save St Patrick!

Ofcourse Northern Europe would have changed and developed also without christianity, even if one can only speculate about the result of such a change. Nothing says that the end result had to be any more violent than the christian world became.

Edited by Carcharodon - 04 Aug 2011 at 11:27
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 18:02
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Unfortunately the christianisation led to the demise of whole cultures in many corners of the world (especially in your own continent) and in some cases it contributed to the extinction of whole peoples. It is not an exaggeration, it actually did happen.


Absolutely ridiculous. If anything the christian priests prevented a worst disaster. Your finger pointing is pathetic.

Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:


Ofcourse Northern Europe would have changed and developed also without christianity, even if one can only speculate about the result of such a change. Nothing says that the end result had to be any more violent than the christian world became.


Wait for a while. Northern Europe is becomming muslim now. I bet in a couple of centuries, when all women in Europe walk under burkas,Wink you'll miss christianity.
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 01 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 20:15
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Interesting oppinion but Italians stayed in Italy. Other Europeans started the colonization of the Americas with Middle Ages technology. At least at the beginnings.
 
Italians stayed in Italy? Given two interesting facts, 1) there was no "Italy" and 2) the names of Colombo, Vespucci, Verazzano and a long list of mercantile entrepeneurs become a bit difficult to explain, with an inescapable colophon (the principalities of the Italian peninsula were adjuncts of imperial Spain) I really wonder what all of this is really about.
 
Or have some forgotten that many a clergyman in the colonial history of the Americas were "Italians" as in the instances of Eusebio Chino and Giovanni Crespi.
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
SPQR View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 31 Oct 2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 917
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SPQR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 22:13
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Yes, but people forgets that the renaissance was an effect of the Age of Discovery and not the other way around. The renaissance was mainly an artistic and humanistic movement, that had no much to do with the technology, which is the topic of this thread.





Well The printing press was invented during the Renaissance, and we all know the impact that has made on the world.

people also forget that the Renaissance was not just centered in Italy, there was a Northern Renaissance as well. Renaissance was not just a thing for some so-called "Lazy Italians" to be part of, it included all of Europe.

and as the person posted above that Italians have played a very large role in the discovery of the Americas this is true. People like Christopher Columbus and Amerigo Vespucci, the very name in which the Americas gets it's name.
Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind.

- Albert Einstein
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Aug 2011 at 22:58
Originally posted by SPQR SPQR wrote:


Well The printing press was invented during the Renaissance, and we all know the impact that has made on the world.
.


Give me a break. Printing is Chinese
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2011 at 12:07
Depends what you mean by printing.
 
The printing press developed by Gutenberg for the first time made mass production possible and therefore books much much more accessible.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
Darius of Parsa View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2007
Status: Offline
Points: 848
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Darius of Parsa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2011 at 17:37
There were many models of the printing press. The Gutenberg printing press is just the most famous of them.
"I am moved to pity, when I think of the brevity of human life, seeing that of all this host of men not one will still be alive in a hundred years time."

Emporer Xerxes I looking upon his army 480 BC
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 01 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2011 at 19:19
Let us not be arcane here. "Printing" fabrics has a hoary history and "movable type" as well but nowhere were several techniques with long usage brought together for the efficient dissemination of information as with the refinements perfected by Gutenberg and their consequent rapid dispersion. Quibble all you might desire, the summation found in the link below raises all of the salient points.
 
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2011 at 20:06
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Depends what you mean by printing.
 
The printing press developed by Gutenberg for the first time made mass production possible and therefore books much much more accessible.


Gutenberg applied the wine press to printing, and developed the lead movable types, which isn't a small achievement. But mass produced books were printed in China and Korea long time before him.
Back to Top
SPQR View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 31 Oct 2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 917
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SPQR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2011 at 20:40
But we are talking about Europe here aren't we... we can agree that the written word had a big impact on Europe. One example of how the printing press made a huge splash was the Protestant Reformation. All from a simple piece of paper nailed to a door listing a few grievances.
Nationalism is an infantile disease. It is the measles of mankind.

- Albert Einstein
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2011 at 20:59
Indeed. We are talking about what Europe brought to the Americas, either locally invented, improved or just carried.
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 01 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Aug 2011 at 21:09
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Depends what you mean by printing.
 
The printing press developed by Gutenberg for the first time made mass production possible and therefore books much much more accessible.


Gutenberg applied the wine press to printing, and developed the lead movable types, which isn't a small achievement. But mass produced books were printed in China and Korea long time before him.
 
Incorrect since the term "mass produced" is not only inapplicable but does not recognize the limitations of Chinese script with respect to production in "mass" numbers. That factor is recognized by all historians not wielding some sort of argumentative axe:
 
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.078 seconds.