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Fashion in China through the ages

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Logic View Drop Down
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    Posted: 21 Aug 2013 at 05:20
I hope to find out more about the different traditional costumes that China has had aside from the Hanfu and Qipao. 



Where does something like the image below, for instance, fit in? What would this be called? When and where did it come from? 

Or, if anyone would be kind enough to share what they know I would really appreciate it. Thanks in advance. 


Edited by Logic - 21 Aug 2013 at 05:23
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lao Tse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Aug 2013 at 09:37
Well, the last image is that of not quite Hanfu, or Qipao. That form of clothing is normally used for performing arts (I've only seen it used in that manner), but it looks more like it was developed for female performers, as early as the Northern Wei, likely closer to Beijing. The headdress that the woman is wearing is more originated towards the end of the Tang, to the early Song. This form was re-integrated into performing in the 1920s-1930s. Clothing that is not Hanfu nor Qipao is more based upon ethnic origin. For example, Mongols as an ethnic group wear something entirely different from say, the Miao ethnicity. Of 56 ethnic groups throughout China, all of them have at least one form of traditional clothing. Since ethnic clothing is no longer banned in any form, traditional clothing is once again poking out of the wood works. 

Miao clothing (examples of different Miao and different styles)
 performers' dress
usual common dress
Longhorn Miao dress
Other ethnic costume
Qiang clothing
Hani costume
Nanai costume
Baizu costume
Historically, ethnic clothing, whether it was Hanfu or any other, was often changed into more and more complex designs on the cloth, or even more simplified, it was also based on accessibility for resources used in clothing. Styles in ethnic clothing didn't always change, most of the changes through clothing are seen through Hanfu. An example of that is the difference between what the Emperors of Han might have worn compared to the Emperors of Ming or Song.

Hope this helps Big smile
Lao Tse


Edited by Lao Tse - 21 Aug 2013 at 09:41
在財富的害處,而是一件好事永遠不持續。我在和平中仅居住在新的風下。 Wei Jia Hong No harm in wealth, but a good thing doesn't last forever. I live only among peace under
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Logic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Aug 2013 at 13:26
Excellent post, Lao! I'll look into the different dresses in the next couple of days. Thanks. 

Would you happen to know when men/women in China started wearing pants?


Edited by Logic - 21 Aug 2013 at 13:36
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lao Tse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Aug 2013 at 03:45
Hmm, well, it depends on what is meant by pants. Men wore under garment pants under their robes, including in court dress, from as early as the Xia and onward. The common man would often wear a short-skirted robe and pants. Common Manchu people had pants under a long overcoat. Court dress, however, used pants as under garments and to keep warm, while traditional robes were worn. Soldiers in China wore pants under metal armor as a better protection for the legs. Women in China haven't been wearing pants for very long in history. Women started to wear pants shortly after the Xinhai Revolution, often wearing a mandarin shirt or something to that equivalent. The 1920s brought more popularity for women wearing pants, and the trend has continuously grown since.
在財富的害處,而是一件好事永遠不持續。我在和平中仅居住在新的風下。 Wei Jia Hong No harm in wealth, but a good thing doesn't last forever. I live only among peace under
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Yingui Lexicon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Oct 2014 at 23:19
Originally posted by Logic Logic wrote:

I hope to find out more about the different traditional costumes that China has had aside from the Hanfu and Qipao. 




This is inauthentic because their hair is left down. In all ancient depictions I saw (paintings and murals), all the women had their hair tied up. Men have their hair tied in topknots, and usually have a hat covering it. 


Edited by Yingui Lexicon - 25 Oct 2014 at 23:20
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lao Tse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Nov 2014 at 05:08
Originally posted by Yingui Lexicon Yingui Lexicon wrote:

Originally posted by Logic Logic wrote:

I hope to find out more about the different traditional costumes that China has had aside from the Hanfu and Qipao. 




This is inauthentic because their hair is left down. In all ancient depictions I saw (paintings and murals), all the women had their hair tied up. Men have their hair tied in topknots, and usually have a hat covering it. 

Actually, hair was mostly tied up in the Song Empire, normally women had their hair tied in ponytails or yes, tied it up. But, having hair tied like is shown above was more common in the Ming, Yuan, Sui, and Age of Divisions.
在財富的害處,而是一件好事永遠不持續。我在和平中仅居住在新的風下。 Wei Jia Hong No harm in wealth, but a good thing doesn't last forever. I live only among peace under
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Yingui Lexicon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 01:42
Originally posted by Lao Tse Lao Tse wrote:

Originally posted by Yingui Lexicon Yingui Lexicon wrote:

Originally posted by Logic Logic wrote:

I hope to find out more about the different traditional costumes that China has had aside from the Hanfu and Qipao. 




This is inauthentic because their hair is left down. In all ancient depictions I saw (paintings and murals), all the women had their hair tied up. Men have their hair tied in topknots, and usually have a hat covering it. 

Actually, hair was mostly tied up in the Song Empire, normally women had their hair tied in ponytails or yes, tied it up. But, having hair tied like is shown above was more common in the Ming, Yuan, Sui, and Age of Divisions.

Are you sure? I am not convinced, for I haven't seen any paintings, murals, even sculptures of women with their hair left down. 

If I am going to be honest, I think the hair left down look was created by Southern Chinese (Hong Kong) TV shows during the 20th century. I have seen depictions of ancient Vietnamese with their hair left down, and also Japanese (hime cut). I believe Chinese and Koreans did not leave hair down. 


Edited by Yingui Lexicon - 07 Nov 2014 at 01:51
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Yingui Lexicon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Nov 2014 at 01:50
I think the Ming dynasty outfit is very elegant. 







Edited by Yingui Lexicon - 07 Nov 2014 at 01:59
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