| FORUM | ARCHIVE |                    | TOTAL QUIZ RESULT |


  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Greatest Explorers
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login


Welcome stranger, click here to read about some of the great benefits of registering for a free account with us and joining us in our global online community.


Greatest Explorers

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Craze_b0i View Drop Down
Shogun
Shogun
Avatar

Joined: 06 Jun 2009
Location: UK
Status: Offline
Points: 200
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Craze_b0i Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Greatest Explorers
    Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 02:31
What explorers from world history do you rate as the greatest? Great in terms of the extent of their discoveries but also in terms of the challenges/adversities they overcame and so forth.
 
Off the top of my head I would pick out:
 
Colombus
Magellan
Cortes
Captain Cook
 
Obviously these are but a few... Who else deserves to be on the list?
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 03:50
Admiral Zheng He, because of the grand style of his travels and that he lay the foundations of several overseas Chinese communities (some of whom still celebrate his memory in ceremonies and temples).

Edited by Carcharodon - 27 Jun 2009 at 03:52
Back to Top
Prince of Zeila View Drop Down
Shogun
Shogun
Avatar
AE Editor

Joined: 20 Mar 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 241
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Prince of Zeila Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 03:56
Zheng He, Ibn Battuta, Hjalmar Johansen & the Fram
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 02 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 06:34
What is the distinction between an "explorer" and a "traveler"...certainly Ibn Battuta was more the latter than the former and Zheng He had clear knowledge of the Muslim world in the Indian Ocean even before retracing earlier steps undertaken by the Yuan dynasts.
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 07:51
Hmm, few explorers have reached lands that noone else visited before.
Back to Top
Prince of Zeila View Drop Down
Shogun
Shogun
Avatar
AE Editor

Joined: 20 Mar 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 241
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Prince of Zeila Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 08:25
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

What is the distinction between an "explorer" and a "traveler"...certainly Ibn Battuta was more the latter than the former and Zheng He had clear knowledge of the Muslim world in the Indian Ocean even before retracing earlier steps undertaken by the Yuan dynasts.
 
Greetings Drgonzaga.
 
I'm using the broad definition, Ibn Battuta was a man that had visited dozens of countries whose cultures, customs and traditions he recorded. From Africa to Europe and from the Middle East to the Indian sub continent and the Far East which makes him worthy of inclusion in my opinion.  Vasco Da Gama's first visit to India is considered a significant event in 'European exploration' evendo India has been an old trading region to most of the states of the Indian Ocean for several milleniums.
 
Similary Zheng He's expeditions were unprecedented in Chinese maritime History, sure there were travelers here and there from Tang, Song and Yuan but none on the scale of Zheng and none had the same impact.
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 02 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 13:31
Greetings and salutations from an Innocent Abroad, Prince, but from the first I must admit my doubts as to this "explorer" business unless we also give credence to a certain Ithacan and his adventures among the Lotus eaters!Wink
 
Recall the 19th century European buzz over the lost explorer Livingston and the intrepid adventures of his finder, Stanley--whom I suppose was the Wolf Blitzer of his day? livingston might have isolated himself up the Zambezi so to speak, but he was as much a "discoverer" as his later counterpart Albert Schweitzer. Similarly, as a result of official hooplah at Beijing over Zheng He and his exploits, most people are unfamiliar with the fact that a century earlier Wang Dayuan sailed into the Indian Ocean, the "Arab Sea" and even coastal Africa not once but twice and recapitulated his travels in the Daoyi Zhilue Guangzheng Xia (Record of Overseas Countries and Peoples) of AD 1349.
 
Let us just say that as a historian, I am more interested in removing the romantic nonsense attached to these intrepid individuals as well as the vocabulary that was totally alien to their exploits. Certainly Vasco da Gama knew exactly where he was going, it was just the logistics of the voyage that generated challenge. Yes, Columbus got a surprise on his way to the "Great Khan"--besides being a little rusty on political events in the Yangtze Valley--but all of his successors in the "Indies" pushed forth upon the basis of "reports" no matter how fanciful (e.g. Cibola, El Dorado).
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
Knights View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar

Joined: 23 Oct 2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 4079
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 15:27
I'd have to include Hanno the Navigator and Himilco. A few Australian ones would be Burke and Wills, and Charles Sturt. 
Back to Top
Craze_b0i View Drop Down
Shogun
Shogun
Avatar

Joined: 06 Jun 2009
Location: UK
Status: Offline
Points: 200
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Craze_b0i Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 19:49
Thank for the replies. Personally I agree we shouldn't romanticise explorers, especially since many were selfish money-grabbing buisnessmen who enslaved natives. Nonetheless they did 'discover' things previously unknown or little-known to folks back home. And that itself represents some sort of achievement.
 
In the case of Vasco da Gama he didn't find India (Europeans already knew where it was). But what he did find was a route to India - along with a whole lot of African coastline.
 
No mention of the polar explorers yet....


Edited by Craze_b0i - 27 Jun 2009 at 19:51
Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 20:44

The uniqueness of Zheng Hes travels was the scale of the enterprice and also the many official contacts that his expeditions took along the way in their quest to show the peoples around the Indian Ocean the might and glory of the Ming Empire. The expeditions was a combination of trade, diplomacy and demonstrations of power. The expeditions made contact and forged political alliances with a lot of states along the way. They also paved the way for increased chinese precense in several places, among them Indonesia and Malacka where thriving chinese colonies still live today.

In comaprison with earlier chinese voyages in the Indian Ocean this enterprice was much larger and much more organized.
 
Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 20:49
In this thread about explorers we must not forget the northman Leif Ericsson who (re) discovered America around AD 1000.
 
 
Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 20:52
Another discoverer is the polynesian king Hotu Matua who led his people from the Marquesas Islands to Easter Island sometime in the first, or early in the second, millenium AD.
Back to Top
fantasus View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke
Avatar

Joined: 08 May 2009
Location: Denmark
Status: Offline
Points: 1943
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jun 2009 at 21:48

We miss here the unknown explorer (a parralel to the unknown soldier) since in most areas the first humans are anonymous. Often their people unknown too.

Back to Top
Prince of Zeila View Drop Down
Shogun
Shogun
Avatar
AE Editor

Joined: 20 Mar 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 241
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Prince of Zeila Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2009 at 01:00
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Greetings and salutations from an Innocent Abroad, Prince, but from the first I must admit my doubts as to this "explorer" business unless we also give credence to a certain Ithacan and his adventures among the Lotus eaters!Wink
 
Recall the 19th century European buzz over the lost explorer Livingston and the intrepid adventures of his finder, Stanley--whom I suppose was the Wolf Blitzer of his day? livingston might have isolated himself up the Zambezi so to speak, but he was as much a "discoverer" as his later counterpart Albert Schweitzer. Similarly, as a result of official hooplah at Beijing over Zheng He and his exploits, most people are unfamiliar with the fact that a century earlier Wang Dayuan sailed into the Indian Ocean, the "Arab Sea" and even coastal Africa not once but twice and recapitulated his travels in the Daoyi Zhilue Guangzheng Xia (Record of Overseas Countries and Peoples) of AD 1349.
 
Let us just say that as a historian, I am more interested in removing the romantic nonsense attached to these intrepid individuals as well as the vocabulary that was totally alien to their exploits. Certainly Vasco da Gama knew exactly where he was going, it was just the logistics of the voyage that generated challenge. Yes, Columbus got a surprise on his way to the "Great Khan"--besides being a little rusty on political events in the Yangtze Valley--but all of his successors in the "Indies" pushed forth upon the basis of "reports" no matter how fanciful (e.g. Cibola, El Dorado).
 
Ouch good replyClap(though Odysseus is considered mythology) 
 
 
 
Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2009 at 01:05
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

 
Recall the 19th century European buzz over the lost explorer Livingston and the intrepid adventures of his finder, Stanley--whom I suppose was the Wolf Blitzer of his day? , El Dorado).
 
 
Stanley seems to have been a more or less insane character who lived by the device "shoot first and ask questions later". Among other people he shot a couple of African children just to get hold of their canoe.
Back to Top
Emperor Barbarossa View Drop Down
Caliph
Caliph
Avatar
r�gh

Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 2898
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Emperor Barbarossa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2009 at 02:31
Marco Polo anyone? One of the first westerners to travel through the silk road and met with Kublai Khan.
Pittsburgh, City of Champions
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2009 at 02:53
The greatest was Columbus. No doubt about it. He jumped into the unknown, unlike all other explorers mentioned here.
Back to Top
Styrbiorn View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 Aug 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 3603
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Styrbiorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2009 at 02:57
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

The greatest was Columbus. No doubt about it. He jumped into the unknown, unlike all other explorers mentioned here.


Well, what differs is rather that he thought he knew where he was going, but where the others were right in their speculations, he wasn't LOL
Back to Top
Carcharodon View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 04 May 2007
Location: Northern Europe
Status: Offline
Points: 4959
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2009 at 03:18

The Swedish father of the binominal nomenclature, the great scientist Carl von Linne, had several students who in the 18th century went out in the world to collect plant and animal specimens and to study nature, culture and geography. Some of them came home while others died in foreign countries. These students came to be some of the greatest explorers Sweden have ever had. Around 20 of them went out on shorter or longer journeys. Here are a couple of them:

 

Peter Forskal (1732 to 1763)  traveled with a Danish expedition to the Arabic peninsula where he died in 1763 from Malaria.

 

Johan Peter Falk (1733 to 1774) went out to explore parts of Siberia but became the victim of depression and committed suicide in 1774.

 

Daniel Solander (1733 to 1782)  participated in James Cooks journey round the globe.

 

Anders Sparrman (1748 to 1820)  went to Africa and China and he also participated in James Cooks second voyage.

 

Per Kalm (1716 to 1779) travelled to Russia and Ukraine. Later he went to North America. There he among other things interviewed descendants to the New Sweden colonists, whereof some still spoke Swedish.

 

Per Osbeck (1723 to1805) went to China and to Java with one of the ships from the Swedish East India Company.

 

Carl Peter Thunberg (1743 to1828)  travelled to South Africas Cape province where he stayed for a while and did botanical studies. Later he went to Indonesia and then to Japan. He also visited Ceylon. Interestingly enough he is today more well known in South Africa and Japan than he is in Sweden.

 

Per Loefling (1729 to1756) visited first the Iberian peninsula and then travelled to South America. He died in Venezuela only 27 years old.

 



Edited by Carcharodon - 07 Aug 2009 at 10:50
Back to Top
Emperor Barbarossa View Drop Down
Caliph
Caliph
Avatar
r�gh

Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 2898
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Emperor Barbarossa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2009 at 05:13
Cabeza de Vaca - (the head of cow apparentlyLOL), who explored around Texas, and found Galveston.

Henry Hudson - Explored around Canada

Amerigo Vespucci - Sailed in Africa and Brazil.

Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot) - Landed in Newfoundland Island in 1497.

Giovanni de Verrazzano- Explored Atlantic Coast
Pittsburgh, City of Champions
Back to Top
fantasus View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke
Avatar

Joined: 08 May 2009
Location: Denmark
Status: Offline
Points: 1943
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2009 at 20:42
I have the impression travellers/explorers from some parts tend to be forgotten. What about all those russian and cossack explorers, tradesmen and "conquerors" who went eastwards(though some, like Bering (who was a dane) were foreigners).
And if Marco Polo and other europeans (Sven Hedin) who went to "new" parts of the eurasian continent are seen as explorers, then we should treat travellers from asia who "first" came to new parts the same way (chinese, indians or japanese "discovering" Europe). Perhaps some invasions from central asia to the periferies (mongols, huns, schytians) could be seen as "explorations", like some see Alexanders Conquests.
Back to Top
Emperor Barbarossa View Drop Down
Caliph
Caliph
Avatar
r�gh

Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 2898
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Emperor Barbarossa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2009 at 02:13
Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:

I have the impression travellers/explorers from some parts tend to be forgotten. What about all those russian and cossack explorers, tradesmen and "conquerors" who went eastwards(though some, like Bering (who was a dane) were foreigners).
And if Marco Polo and other europeans (Sven Hedin) who went to "new" parts of the eurasian continent are seen as explorers, then we should treat travellers from asia who "first" came to new parts the same way (chinese, indians or japanese "discovering" Europe). Perhaps some invasions from central asia to the periferies (mongols, huns, schytians) could be seen as "explorations", like some see Alexanders Conquests.


You make some very good points fantasus. The Cossacks were noted explorers who went into Siberia and kicked out many of the indigenous Asiatic people there. Nomadic tribes such as the Huns, Scythians, Sarmatians, Mongols, Magyars, and even the Slavs could be considered explorers in a sense.
Pittsburgh, City of Champions
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 02 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2009 at 03:40
As can be easily devised from the responses. a definition here all depends upon just whose closet is being "explored". One could make a sound argument that "exploration" requires a virgin, and in that sense the truly unknown becomes problematic. Earlier, Zelia assigned poor Odysseus to the realm of myth, but in a sense all of the stories of intrepid travelers do assume mythical cloaks. I am afraid that even in speaking of the "Age of Exploration" (1450-1550), many of the garlands devised by historiography do assume mythical proportions--except they should be be better known as nationalistic chauvinisms. Back in 1892-1893, during the Columbian Quadricentennial, that poor sailor was often pushed off the stage by "rival" claimants--recall that it was just at this time in Historiography that the banners of others were heralded--with a good degree of fraud I might say if one looks at names such as Leif Ericson and Amerigo Vespucci. The funny part here is that none of these individuals sallied forth alone and as we all know, the truly intrepid have been lost to the "mystic halls of memory". Keep in mind that Magellan did not actually circumnavigate the globe, but who recalls Sebastian Elcano, much less the rest of his companions?
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
Prince of Zeila View Drop Down
Shogun
Shogun
Avatar
AE Editor

Joined: 20 Mar 2009
Status: Offline
Points: 241
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Prince of Zeila Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2009 at 04:52
Drgonzaga
 
Well myths usually are heavily doctored versions of real events and people, so there might have been a real Ithacan lost for a decade in modern Turkiye and the cyclops might simply have been a large one-eyed man fit to play in NBA.
 
Another interesting egnimatic group of explorers would be the Ancient sailors of the Straits of Malacca that sailed to Madagascar and are part of the ethnogenesis of the modern Malagasy people.


Edited by Prince of Zeila - 29 Jun 2009 at 04:53
Back to Top
fantasus View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke
Avatar

Joined: 08 May 2009
Location: Denmark
Status: Offline
Points: 1943
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2009 at 17:55
But when did the "classic" type of exploration and discoveries end? Perhaps we may say about 100 years ago, when first North Pole and then South Pole were reached by Peary, Amundsen and Scott. From then on at least (or perhaps before) there was not much left on land for exploration. (The underwater, subterranean and Space is an entirely different matter, were technology, big funding and large organisations means much more)
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.