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How to teach Chess..???

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    Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 04:15
...Hi all...
 
...i have a six year old son who has taken an interest in the game of Chess...he was attracted by the pieces (the horsey and the castle!!) and watching me play...so i thought i would make an effort to perhaps try and teach him some rudiments of the game...there i came unstuck, it really is a hard game to teach!!!...i learnt when i was young (my grandfather taught me, but i can't recall exactly how!!) but i cannot seem to find a good way to get my son to learn....i am not pushing this too hard, i want him to enjoy the experience rather than get bogged down in the Nimzo Indian or the Queen's Gambit Declined and all that...!!!Dead
 
...i started off by taking one piece at a time and explaining what they can and can't do...how to set up the board etc...but it soon became clear that was too awkward and too much info to take in...how do you explain how the knight moves..??!!...after many attempts at coming in at different angles, i ended up just playing the game with him and explaining as we went along....for example, telling him how each piece can move as and when he went to move them....how they take another piece etc... it was still troublesome but after a few 'games' he kind of got the idea of check and checkmate ("when you can see the king"), and remembered how some of the pieces moved...(he is still under the impression that the person who won is the one with the most captured pieces!)...
 
.....still a long way to go, so i was wondering if any WH members know of any ideas or better ways to teach Chess to a youngster or any tips they could pass on...??
 
...many thanks....AoO....


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 08:24
Try the PC chess programme Fritz and Chesster from the German chess specialist Chess Base. PC based and from all reports excellent. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Act of Oblivion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 15:00
Originally posted by 4ZZZ 4ZZZ wrote:

Try the PC chess programme Fritz and Chesster from the German chess specialist Chess Base. PC based and from all reports excellent. 
 
...thanks for the advice... i did think about PC based learning tool, i think my son might be interested in that method....i will check it out.....thank you.....AoO... 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Northman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 16:05
I don't know what works for you and your son AoO, but my method to teach my son (and now grandson) the game is simple.
I knew a 5 year old cannot keep the concentration while an opponent thinks about the next move, nor can he imagine winning over an adult.
 
So from day one I made it a game where he an I were teammates - and we played both sides (white and black). After a move, we simply turned the board and we said - what have they been up to this time?
We discussed every move together, no long explanations on how the individual pieces moves - we took that as a part of the story.
 
And by the way - I incorporated the terms "walk" and "jump".
Walk is when a piece move in "straight line" (perpendicular to the board)
Jump is when a piece move diagonally.
 
So the knight can walk-walk-jump. The tower can only walk - the Quenss can both etc.
A pawn can walk one step at a time but have to attack by jumping the enemy.
 
I remember him asking "why do they have to jump when they attack" - but gave the best answer himself "oh, I know - because they are so small..."
Makes it a bit more fun to remember for the kid.
 
It worked for us - maybe it will for you too...
 
 
 
 
   
   If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.    (Albert Einstein)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 17:06
If I will have son in future I can't let his intellect to decay with such an archaic strategy game. 8 x 8 squares and 7 different type of units huh...


I would teach this Tongue

http://www.worldhistoria.com/topic127429_post74186.html#74186


Edited by Paradigm of Humanity - 25 Mar 2012 at 17:09
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Act of Oblivion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 21:15
Originally posted by Paradigm of Humanity Paradigm of Humanity wrote:

If I will have son in future I can't let his intellect to decay with such an archaic strategy game. 8 x 8 squares and 7 different type of units huh...


I would teach this Tongue

http://www.worldhistoria.com/topic127429_post74186.html#74186
 
....well, i am sure my little boy would be very interested in such a game, but that kind of thing is some way off!!.....i would like to keep the computer 'games' addiction thing at bay for some while..as long as i can!Evil Smile..... i am sure that one day he will delve into the cyber world...but for now, i like the idea that he can play with someone 'real' before he turns to cyber isolation later in life...!!!
 
..thanks for the reply PoH....all the best...AoO...


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Act of Oblivion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 21:23
Originally posted by Northman Northman wrote:

I don't know what works for you and your son AoO, but my method to teach my son (and now grandson) the game is simple.
I knew a 5 year old cannot keep the concentration while an opponent thinks about the next move, nor can he imagine winning over an adult.
 
So from day one I made it a game where he an I were teammates - and we played both sides (white and black). After a move, we simply turned the board and we said - what have they been up to this time?
We discussed every move together, no long explanations on how the individual pieces moves - we took that as a part of the story.
 
And by the way - I incorporated the terms "walk" and "jump".
Walk is when a piece move in "straight line" (perpendicular to the board)
Jump is when a piece move diagonally.
 
So the knight can walk-walk-jump. The tower can only walk - the Quenss can both etc.
A pawn can walk one step at a time but have to attack by jumping the enemy.
 
I remember him asking "why do they have to jump when they attack" - but gave the best answer himself "oh, I know - because they are so small..."
Makes it a bit more fun to remember for the kid.
 
It worked for us - maybe it will for you too...
 
 
 
...i do like the idea of team-mates, that is something i will try...as you say, a five year old does not have the time or patience to wait and ponder, which is why i opted for the 'play and see' tactic..!!...like yourself, we use a different kind of terminology while he gets familiar with the games basics...he gets what 'check' means but explains it in terms of being able to 'see the king' and that he then needs to be moved to somewhere safe...i did use the 'jump' word for the knight..horses can jump etc.....but i do like your 'walk-walk-jump' idea as well....will give it a try....
 
.thanks for the input North.....AoO...


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 22:01
Originally posted by Act of Oblivion Act of Oblivion wrote:

....well, i am sure my little boy would be very interested in such a game, but that kind of thing is some way off!!.....i would like to keep the computer 'games' addiction thing at bay for some while..as long as i can!Evil Smile..... i am sure that one day he will delve into the cyber world...but for now, i like the idea that he can play with someone 'real' before he turns to cyber isolation later in life...!!!
 
..thanks for the reply PoH....all the best...AoO...

Please, don't be so skeptical of change Ermm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 22:09
Didn't do you the courtesy of reading your whole post (and I apologise, my friend), but I can speak as a young learner of the game - I was beating grown men who'd played for decades at the age of about 10.

I don't know if a love of knights, castles, soldiering and warfare was a help to me.  At primary school they took us to Hadrian's Wall and we made our own legionary armour which was all great fun, marching around the ruins of forts and buildings.   I accumulated a mass of medieval lego, too.

I picked up the game at about 7 or 8 (maybe 6 is a little too young).  Maybe teaching strategies is not very productive yet, but starting with the bare basics such as how pieces move.  For example, horses/knights move in an L shape, they can leap over enemies and friends alike, but no other pieces can.  The rest will come.  But the key is learning to walk before he can run.



Edited by Zagros - 25 Mar 2012 at 22:10
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Act of Oblivion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 23:25
Originally posted by Paradigm of Humanity Paradigm of Humanity wrote:

Please, don't be so skeptical of change Ermm
 ...i was not trying to be off-hand PoH...!!...sorry if my post came across like that...
 
..i am not so much sceptical about computer games, just very wary....i was a young boy when the computer age kicked in for the common people and i was not taken with computer games even back then ...it's just my personal attitude towards such things... back then playing computer games meant being stuck indoors and i was an outdoor kind of lad...!!..football, bike-riding, playing in the local woods etc..
 
...i have no doubt whatsoever that my own son will eventually get the gaming bug, i don't think it can be avoided...and i can see the attraction nowadays, i just don't want computer games to become the primary choice of personal 'entertaiment' for him like it seems to be for so many youngsters......not only that, i object wholeheartedly to becoming a parent who gets trapped in the consumerism of the gaming industry..i.e...buy one gadget then another gadget, then buy the updated version, then pay out for the super-dooper version and so on, not to mention the cost of the games themselves.....i don't play that kind of game...but, each to their own, really...
 
..regards....AoO....


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Act of Oblivion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2012 at 23:38
Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:

Didn't do you the courtesy of reading your whole post (and I apologise, my friend), but I can speak as a young learner of the game - I was beating grown men who'd played for decades at the age of about 10.

I don't know if a love of knights, castles, soldiering and warfare was a help to me.  At primary school they took us to Hadrian's Wall and we made our own legionary armour which was all great fun, marching around the ruins of forts and buildings.   I accumulated a mass of medieval lego, too.

I picked up the game at about 7 or 8 (maybe 6 is a little too young).  Maybe teaching strategies is not very productive yet, but starting with the bare basics such as how pieces move.  For example, horses/knights move in an L shape, they can leap over enemies and friends alike, but no other pieces can.  The rest will come.  But the key is learning to walk before he can run.
 
....i too learnt around 7 or 8, my grandfather belonged to a local chess club and he often took me along...and i just enjoyed it....my primary school headmaster also promoted the game in his classes, so the game stayed with me....i no longer play 'properly', and the last serious game i played was about 14 years ago and i was trounced by some whipper-snapper...!!.Embarrassed
 
..as for my son, he is perhaps quite young to start the game, but i did not want to defer his initial interest.... i have started with the very basics, for all i know, in a few weeks time the novelty may have worn off, but i don't want it to wear off!!....i think chess is good brain exercise...but i need to keep the learning as fun as possible...at this stage, i am not bothered about correcting positional mistakes or tactics etc...it is just about moving the pieces around the board in the (almost) correct fashion...as Northman pointed out earlier, terminology seems to be important...all the while pawns are 'little soldiers,' the knight is a 'horsey', the castle is 'the knight's house' and the queen is actually a 'princess'...my offspring seems happy to play along....it's been fun so far, with a surprising amount of laughter given the games reputation for being 'serious'....!!
 
..thanks for replying Zagros......AoO.... 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Mar 2012 at 08:08
I think that a couple of things that you can do to make it interesting is to give your son 1 move checkmates. There are plenty of puzzles to be found on the net. I found this one with a quick search

http://www.chess-game-strategies.com/mate-in-one.html

The other thing to do to mix it around and do basic end games. Say 2 rooks and the king against a lone king. I was taught about the end game first and though I was not much of a player (after nearly 40 years of playing haaa haaa) I still think that this is a good way to start.

Chess is an excellent game for youngsters even those of 6 years of age.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Act of Oblivion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Mar 2012 at 14:30
Originally posted by 4ZZZ 4ZZZ wrote:

I think that a couple of things that you can do to make it interesting is to give your son 1 move checkmates. ......The other thing to do to mix it around and do basic end games. Say 2 rooks and the king against a lone king. I was taught about the end game first and though I was not much of a player (after nearly 40 years of playing haaa haaa) I still think that this is a good way to start.
 
....yes, the 'end-game' workout is a good idea....you have prompted my memory and think that was used in how i was taught.....at this age, i think a quick fix via an end-game would be appropriate and then i could expand the game as we go along....
 
..i was not much of a player either!!..i had my moments in a few tournaments, but all i ever won was a secondary school competition for 12-16 year olds....(an interest in rock music and girls kicked in just after and that was the end of my chess 'career'..!!)
 
..lots of good tips from everyone, most welcome....thank you all......AoO...


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Mar 2012 at 17:12
Originally posted by Act of Oblivion Act of Oblivion wrote:

Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:

Didn't do you the courtesy of reading your whole post (and I apologise, my friend), but I can speak as a young learner of the game - I was beating grown men who'd played for decades at the age of about 10.

I don't know if a love of knights, castles, soldiering and warfare was a help to me.  At primary school they took us to Hadrian's Wall and we made our own legionary armour which was all great fun, marching around the ruins of forts and buildings.   I accumulated a mass of medieval lego, too.

I picked up the game at about 7 or 8 (maybe 6 is a little too young).  Maybe teaching strategies is not very productive yet, but starting with the bare basics such as how pieces move.  For example, horses/knights move in an L shape, they can leap over enemies and friends alike, but no other pieces can.  The rest will come.  But the key is learning to walk before he can run.
 
....i too learnt around 7 or 8, my grandfather belonged to a local chess club and he often took me along...and i just enjoyed it....my primary school headmaster also promoted the game in his classes, so the game stayed with me....i no longer play 'properly', and the last serious game i played was about 14 years ago and i was trounced by some whipper-snapper...!!.Embarrassed
 
..as for my son, he is perhaps quite young to start the game, but i did not want to defer his initial interest.... i have started with the very basics, for all i know, in a few weeks time the novelty may have worn off, but i don't want it to wear off!!....i think chess is good brain exercise...but i need to keep the learning as fun as possible...at this stage, i am not bothered about correcting positional mistakes or tactics etc...it is just about moving the pieces around the board in the (almost) correct fashion...as Northman pointed out earlier, terminology seems to be important...all the while pawns are 'little soldiers,' the knight is a 'horsey', the castle is 'the knight's house' and the queen is actually a 'princess'...my offspring seems happy to play along....it's been fun so far, with a surprising amount of laughter given the games reputation for being 'serious'....!!
 
..thanks for replying Zagros......AoO.... 


If that's what Northman said, then I agree.  It's all about lighting up the imagination and tapping into his competitive drive.  I have lost all of my nous for the game too, I used to be able to read 5,6,7,8 turns ahead and shepherd my opponents to doom, but now, I would be doing well with 2 or 3.

Even if he picks it up at 10 that's still young enough to make a master out of him.
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Act of Oblivion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Mar 2012 at 19:06
Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:

It's all about lighting up the imagination and tapping into his competitive drive. 
 
..yes, agreed....he showed his imagination by wanting to explore the game of chess, and competative drive (to beat me!!), and i am more than happy to encourage him......!!


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How you people are so sure we already not living in a virtual reality, somekind of Matrix? There is no way out from cyberworld Tongue
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