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Hunain ibn Ishaq or al-Mutadibih

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    Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 19:00
There's an interesting apparent clash at wikipedia between the picture at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cheshm_manuscript.jpg and the same one at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ophthalmology_in_medieval_Islam
 
At least, there's a clash of captions, one saying the author of the manuscript was al-Mutadibih and the other one saying Hunain ibn Ishaq. Are they both the same person?
 
Is there a clue in the Arabic script? The first link above is a bigger picture.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 19:31
Hello Graham
 
Hunain ibn Ishaq was an Arab christian (ethnic Arab) who was a translator of greek works (the first to translate directly from Greek, previously translations were done first to Syriac) and an opthomologist. He worked as a personal physician to several caliphs.
 
Now about the manuscript, the writing is in regular Naskh which indicate it is at least 11th century and in it there are references to greek terminology which is rare in late books but wide spread in old ones. Now if I was a literary critic I could have easily told you when it was written based on he style of writing but I can't but from the looks of it the style is not the same as the one 9th century authors use (i.e. it is more professional and less literary).
 
On the other hand I have no idea about the guy above nor I think his name was correctly spelled but I will try to look into him.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 19:59
Is cheshm also an Arabic word?
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 20:04
What do you mean?
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 20:08
Cheshm it means eye in Persian.
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 20:17
Well the manuscript is written in Arabic and was found in a Persian liberary. By the way the guy called Al-Mutadibih is also Persian who died c. 1200 and again I am not a literary critic but the writing style seems to be 11th century and beyond and back then Arabic was still widely used in Persia.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 22:18
Interestingly, according to wiki ibn Ishaq had mastered the Persian language, along with Greek.

Even for a Persian (I am referring to Mutadibih), it was a rarity to call work by the native tongue as opposed to Arabic, as you well know.  So I find it intriguing.  Official documents, research everything was in Arabic because it was the language of the Caliphate. That's the most practical explanation.

Edited by Zagros - 30 Jun 2010 at 22:19
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 22:29
He was from Hira (in todays Southern Iraq) which was still full of Persians so no surprise there.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 23:03
It is a surprise (for me at least) because most all of the other Persian scholars, scientists, mathematicians etc., used Arabic titles as well as text, regardless of their being in Baghdad or Herat.

Edited by Zagros - 30 Jun 2010 at 23:04
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 23:51

Scholarship in Arabic by the 12th century in Persia deteriorated to an extent that it was comprable to situation of Latin in Medieval and renaissance europe written but rarely spoken.

Al-Sakaki (ironically the greatest Arabic linguist and literary theorist of the 13th century) spoke Arabic with a heavy accent and knew very little of Arab literature. In his books about literary theory he typically used Persian poetry to illustrate his concepts.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jul 2010 at 10:37
Thanks everyone.
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