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Hungarian art

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brushhippie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote brushhippie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Hungarian art
    Posted: 09 May 2012 at 04:26


These were drawn by a gentleman who immigrated to the US in fifty seven, he had spent time in a concentration camp in the late forties and was involved with the revolution of Hungary in fifty six. These represent the Magyars who settled in the Carpathian Basin in the first century. These are dated from the late forties through late fifties.

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Chieftain
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote calvo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 May 2012 at 00:20
Interesting, but this artwork, like all the rest, is a result of the artist's imagination.
We only have very limited knowledge of what the ancient Magyars looked like, but the remains of their weapons reflected strong influences from the Turkic peoples of Central Asia, although they were acutally Finno-Ugrian.
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brushhippie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote brushhippie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 May 2012 at 01:33
What would someone have used to achieve the VERY fine lines in the fifties? If its ink, this guy was a master because it is too fine for ball point and too neat for fountain. I do understand these artworks are all based on the legends and stories passed down from family members, but I have yet to find anything like these. I talked to a guy at a fairly large art gallery and he had no luck finding any either, making them fairly unique I would think.
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brushhippie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote brushhippie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 May 2012 at 02:24
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 May 2012 at 03:03
Originally posted by brushhippie brushhippie wrote:

What would someone have used to achieve the VERY fine lines in the fifties? If its ink, this guy was a master because it is too fine for ball point and too neat for fountain. I do understand these artworks are all based on the legends and stories passed down from family members, but I have yet to find anything like these. I talked to a guy at a fairly large art gallery and he had no luck finding any either, making them fairly unique I would think.
 
 
Before all us technicians got all gobbled up in CAD (Computer Aided Design), we designed and documented by hand using fine pens from Rotring in example. They could draw a line only a tenth of a millimeter, so I think it's very possible that these pens were used for the drawinngs.
 
rapidograph
 
 


Edited by Northman - 17 May 2012 at 03:04
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brushhippie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote brushhippie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 May 2012 at 23:43
These were available in the fifties? before my time. Thanks for the response Northman!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 May 2012 at 00:41
Originally posted by brushhippie brushhippie wrote:

These were available in the fifties? before my time. Thanks for the response Northman!
 
Since 1928 - you know, although my son sometimes think I'm a fossil, the 50'es wasn't exactly the stoneage....  Wink
 
and you're very welcome.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote brushhippie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 May 2012 at 02:30
 
Originally posted by Northman Northman wrote:

Originally posted by brushhippie brushhippie wrote:

These were available in the fifties? before my time. Thanks for the response Northman!
 
Since 1928 - you know, although my son sometimes think I'm a fossil, the 50'es wasn't exactly the stoneage....  Wink
 
and you're very welcome.
 
 
LOL Point taken! Makes sense, with a little luck and a bunch more Hungarian lessons Ill know the story behind all these drawings! They are one of a kind.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mable01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Sep 2012 at 20:13
Here again I got to see a new interesting art form that is Hungarian art. Seems like some existent scenes were printed on the paper attractively.
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