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Katana

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King Kang of Mu View Drop Down
Chieftain
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote King Kang of Mu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Mar 2011 at 19:45
Originally posted by Panther Panther wrote:


Oh well, a zombie apocalypse, huh? Why didn't you just say so! Why use a Katana when i can very well just stick with the specifically modified for my car, GAU-8 avenger 30mm Gatling, thank ya very much! Whoo-hoo Big smile

 
LOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

very funny panther.    I think Joe meant you need to severe their heads or spine to kill it which you might need few shots without perfect accuracy.  but then again you don't need much accuracy with Gatling.  but good luck to ya when they get close......Tongue
 
 
 
Originally posted by Joe Joe wrote:

A man can find a spirit in violence and many have. I bet more samurai in times past were obsessed with their fighting and battle abilities rather than being "diplomatic". They were allowed to kill people for "disrespect" or if somebody owned a katana.


there is something to that statement.  i was watching this movie called Last Castle with Robert Redford.   His character was court marshaled commander in military prison and he was teaching his fellow inmate how to salute.  And he said something like it originated from medieval knights.  before they went on the battles(mostly duels I would assume), they lifted the visors of their helmet to see each other eye to eye, to acknowledge each other, to give respect to what you are about to kill.  You can see these kind of metaphors in movies like Avatar or some other new ageism, or environmentalism, cultural/ethno diversity arguments also, even among modern day hunters actually. those are  aspects that i do appreciate to a degree.   But in practical condition, defining what is respectable means also defining what is disrespectable which can easily turn into an excuse for violence. 
 
Originally posted by rider rider wrote:

it's first about the craftsmanship that goes into the construction of the blade, then it's about the man who wields the blade, and thirdly it is about how to wield the blade. 

Everyone (you understand what I mean) can kill with a sword. The art and beauty of the sword lies not in killing with it, but in achieving a higher spiritual existence. The true master of the blade is not the one who kills a thousand men, but the one who wins every fight without unsheathing the blade. 

those statements are very true too Rider.   often it's the mental game that decides fight and sometimes just by how you walk into the fight the fight is already decided and there is no need.   and that's even nothing to do with metaphysical spirituality, just being aware of one's ability and surrounding at all times.  but just that in itself has much spiritual connection like being in a subconsciously awaken state.  you become more sensitive to little noises around you or you sense the danger ahead and so on.

 
Originally posted by rider rider wrote:

 it's never the killing that's the problem, the problem always lies in living. 

 
omg, that statement is so epic that i want to frame it!   it's kind of statement that so perfect as it is that i don't even want to break it down actually.
 
Well done, Rider!
ClapClapClapClap
 


Edited by King Kang of Mu - 01 Mar 2011 at 20:58
Nothing requires a greater effort of thought than arguments to justify the rule of non-thought.

Milan Kundera
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hugoestr View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hugoestr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Mar 2011 at 22:26
Pretty nice post, Rider.

Although it is worthy to mention that this kind of perfection through craft seems to be something that Japan has and applies to practically anything.

The ritualized forms are actually an amazing teaching tool, since a form has a lot of built-in instruction in it. That is something that I believe is worth emulating.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rider Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Mar 2011 at 22:40

Even a gladius is something more than just a weapon. True, the Romans never attested a special value to the gladius, but this is not to say that they did not appreciate the spiritual aspect. Indeed, there is very much evidence that they did appreciate it. Take for example the quote by Metellus Scipio who said 'Imperator se bene habet', or 'Your commander is alright.' when he had a dying wound even though he'd been a total coward in his life.

You might think it's all "cool" and "hip" to just charge with the sword, but there's more to it. Even in Kurosawa's 'Seven Samurai' you've got a scene where the reckless man loses while the calm one wins. And the battle was decided before either drew the sword. 

Originally posted by Joe Joe wrote:

Why would you train with a katana or a gladius or any other sword if your not ready to kill. I understand being diplomatic and such is best but why train with such weapons if your not willing to kill?

Why do you go running if you're not going to participate in a marathon? Why sail if you're not going to sail around the world? Being diplomatic is indeed the best, but you are confusing this with what I am saying. It is not about training to kill. It is, first and foremost, about training itself. The act of training and improving.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Joe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Mar 2011 at 07:30
The same could be said about the modern military.

"This is my rifle. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My rifle is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. My rifle, without me, is useless. Without my rifle, I am useless. I must fire my rifle true. I must shoot straighter than my enemy who is trying to kill me. I must shoot him before he shoots me."


I understand there's a spiritual attachment and awareness gained from training in such deadly arts but also arrogance, greed and anger can come from them as well. I feel its fickle to associate a spiritual aspect so strongly for something was designed to kill. I just think that as humans we attach special meanings to acute awareness and special training. A samurai, a knight or any "warrior" mythological or current is a special person in the sense they have extra abilities. The ability to kill is central. I could be a serial murderer you don't know. I could even have a ritual in which I enjoy the chase and hunting down of people. That still at the end of the day means though that I kill. There is a special meaning in our heads. I'd say "riflesmans" creed's and any variation of such is designed to attach people to the special nature of their killing tool, whether it is a katana,  a gladius or an M4. Most people who are warriors in the military will admit they are warriors but few will ever say "I'm a killer" pure and simple. Few will admit their "special nature" or religious aspect is nothing more than superhuman awareness of themselves and them around them.


Edited by Joe - 02 Mar 2011 at 07:31
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kirghiz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Mar 2011 at 09:51
Originally posted by King Kang of Mu King Kang of Mu wrote:

oh here is a PBS docu called Japan: the Memoirs of a Secret Empire to go along with this thread when you guys bored.  bit of 'Orientalist' tone like many of these Western docus on 'East' still, but still a good docu I thought.     I will upload the first episode and link the playlist.  3 episodes total about hour each.

 

http://www.youtube.com/show?p=BcRMz-jlw8Y&s=1
Thanks again KKM.  I enjoyed watching this documentary.
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