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Life in space?

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Carcharodon View Drop Down
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    Posted: 25 Sep 2009 at 23:45
How big are the chances for life in space? Do you think its very rare or do you think its rather common?

And if there are life, how common is it for that life to develop into intelligent beings capable of creating some sort of civilisations?

Just interesting to hear your opinions.


To get some perspective on how big universe is and how many galaxies, and how many stars there really are out there I just add a little movie:


Hubble Deep Field: The Most Imp. Image Ever Taken

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgg2tpUVbXQ&feature=related


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Birddog View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Birddog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 2009 at 00:15
Some are hopeful that we might find evidence of past life in our own solar system, (off Earth I mean). If we find that life evolved on two seperate worlds in one solar system, that will pretty well prove the is alot of different life out there. I hope there is.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Omar al Hashim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 2009 at 02:23
Bacteria I think are almost certain.

More complicated life are a mathematical certainty. (Not that that actually means anything)

As it has occurred on one planet the probability of complicated life is non-zero. That means in an infinite universe it must occur an infinite number of times.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 2009 at 03:01
I have the impression that finding intelligence life elsewhere is zero. Life at any level it may be more likely, but I am not so sure, either.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Justinian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 2009 at 05:40
I have two thoughts on the subject.  One is that there is no other life than on our planet, which is certainly food for thought if that is the case; all the solar systems in all the galaxies in our universe...  The other is that there is, whether it is confined to lower life forms, bacteria and what not, or higher forms such as ourselves.  As it is I have no definitive opinion, though I do hope there are higher life forms that we simply do not have the technology to discover at this time. 

Though presuming that is the case, I'll probably be nothing but dust in the wind by the time any kind of first contact occurs.
"War is a cowardly escape from the problems of peace."--Thomas Mann

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 2009 at 05:42
Hello to you all
 
Although I am a firm believer in science, I think the probability of life in space is quite almost zero.
 
Yes, mathematically the probabbility of life out there is higher than the probability of evolution here (evolution did happen by the way) on earth but the probability that such life was distroyed by some cataclysmic cosmological event is even greater which means there might have been life but it was distroyed.
 
Al-Jassas
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote es_bih Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 2009 at 06:24
Originally posted by Al Jassas Al Jassas wrote:

Hello to you all
 
Although I am a firm believer in science, I think the probability of life in space is quite almost zero.
 
Yes, mathematically the probabbility of life out there is higher than the probability of evolution here (evolution did happen by the way) on earth but the probability that such life was distroyed by some cataclysmic cosmological event is even greater which means there might have been life but it was distroyed.
 
Al-Jassas


By that theory, there is just as much chance that some was not destroyed. I.E. if we have not been wiped out after countless natural disasters the last few millenia, I am sure that there is a good amount that haven't either.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 2009 at 11:06
Originally posted by Al Jassas Al Jassas wrote:

Hello to you all
 
Although I am a firm believer in science, I think the probability of life in space is quite almost zero.
 
Yes, mathematically the probabbility of life out there is higher than the probability of evolution here (evolution did happen by the way) on earth but the probability that such life was distroyed by some cataclysmic cosmological event is even greater which means there might have been life but it was distroyed.
 
Al-Jassas



Since the amount of stars are so enormously high (only in our galaxy there are a couple of hundred billions of stars, and there there are some hundred of billion galaxies, and at least some stars have planets, whereof some can be suitable for life) it ought to be a rather good probability for life out there.
And as we seen here on earth, life can be rather recilient eventhough it is hit by cataclysmic events now and then.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 2009 at 11:14
I go with Omar's argument, though I have some sympathy with al-Jassas's view - I'd just suggest that it be restricted to most life having been destroyed in the past (or not having yet come into existence). That still leaves plenty of room for co-eval systems. (Not of course that there is any such thing as absolute simultaneity, which complicates the issue: two civilisations could each see the other even though they existed at different times in their own time-frames.)
 
It also seems to me we may have to be ready to modify our ideas of how 'life' and a 'living organism' are defined.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Sep 2009 at 12:25
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

I go with Omar's argument, though I have some sympathy with al-Jassas's view - I'd just suggest that it be restricted to most life having been destroyed in the past (or not having yet come into existence). That still leaves plenty of room for co-eval systems. (Not of course that there is any such thing as absolute simultaneity, which complicates the issue: two civilisations could each see the other even though they existed at different times in their own time-frames.)


One shall not forget the sheer matemathical power of it. Even if there are only one single planet where life has managed to survive in each galaxy (and we know that life has survived at least on one planet in our galaxy) there would still be hundred of billions planets with life. If life just survived in every thousand galaxy it would still be hundred of millions. The galaxies themselves are so immense that there ought to be at least some worlds that could harbour life and where this life can survive. Life is rather recilient, we see lifeforms in environments that can seem rather hash (extreme dry deserts, hot springs, black smokers, deep down in the crust of the earth, in for us very poisonous environments and so on). Life has also managed to survive different more or less cataclysmic events (asteroid impacts, changes in atmosphere, a nearly global ice and other things) and still survived. And not only survived for a while but survived for nearly 4 billion years. So it seems that if life manage to get a start it can cling on to a world rather stubbornly.

For the matter of advanced civilisation then it is another matter. It took nearly four billion years until Earth produced any civilization, so civilisations are probably extremely rare.

 
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

  It also seems to me we may have to be ready to modify our ideas of how 'life' and a 'living organism' are defined.


Maybe our definitions of life are to narrow. If we expand our definitions of what life can be than maybe there is even bigger possibility to one day find something living out there.
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