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Living with Denmark’s Democratic Socialism

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    Posted: 13 Jan 2018 at 13:11
Many times I find it hard in a few words to explain what the difference is when foreign people call Denmark a socialist country and align us with ie. Russia.

This is not a subject necessarily for debate but a well written explanation to anyone interested:


NANCY GRAHAM HOLM

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Living with Denmark’s Democratic Socialism

Red but not communism.

 

As an expat American who’s lived in Denmark since 1991, I’ve been longing to write about Danish Democratic Socalism, but my colleague, Contenius beat me to it with his entry last Friday (Daily Kos, 6 November). I like what Contenius says: The Nordic Model could never be applied to the USA in its current form but this is no reason to reject it altogether. The MIT study that Contenius refers to, confirms that with reforms and fine tuning, the model is sustainable. 

But I have something else on my mind.

What concerns me is why so many Americans want to  - choose to - find evil in Denmark’s form of democratic socialism.  I’ve been participating in the roller coaster commentary threads following Ana Swanson’s interview with Michael Booth in the Washington Post  and I’m sad to see that so many of the comments are harsh and vitriolic in nature. No amount of evidence or clarification is enough to mollify some of these commentators. They just get angrier and more irritated because positive comments are assumed to be lies or to have negative ulterior motives. You would think that Americans would be curious about Denmark after both Bernie and Hillary mentioned it in the Democratic debate.

Why so much anger?

Here’s my best educated guess: Most Americans have been brought up to believe that the USA is the best country in the world and that most people in other nations wish they could live in it. This means that it feels unpatriotic to admire someone else’s political system; disloyal – close to treason - to even consider the possibility that another socioeconomic system might be superior.

America’s superiority is an assumption I carried with me throughout my life and I probably brought it with me to Denmark when I was hired to teach for one year at the national journalism college. The one-year gig became two and then three and then five until I was granted academic tenure and permanent residency. By then, I was well acquainted with Denmark’s democratic socialism and after marrying a Danish national and realizing that I’d probably be staying forever, I started to consider myself fortunate.  Let me tell you why.

First, I like Danish egalitarianism.

OK. This clearly makes me out to be a liberal. As moral psychologist, Jonathan Haidt teaches us in his provocative book, The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion (2013) liberals need to feel equal to everybody while conservatives need to feel superior to at least a few. This makes Denmark a perfect fit for American social liberals and a frustrating - even exasperating - experience for Americans who identify as conservative.

Personally, I like how Danes value work and workers. They seem to understand that nothing is produced or accomplished in society without labor and they honor rank and file workers just as much as managers. In Danish society, human beings are judged by the strength of their character, not by their professional status or the size of their pay-check.  Weekend getaway planning conferences often include everybody-at-the-office, not just upper and middle management, but secretaries, cantine workers and custodians.  Everyone is entitled to express opinions and they do. In Denmark, medical doctors do not wear white coats (except in hospitals) and they normally introduce themselves by their first names. Professors and teachers are also called by their first names and everybody else too that you might meet on the job. The majority of work places have a kitchen and eating area so that mid-morning and mid-afternoon coffee breaks are social events with freshly brewed coffee served in cups with saucers and bakery goods – including, on occasion -  wienerbrød  (yes, what Americans call Danish).

Union membership is not compulsory in Denmark yet 80% of people with jobs (skilled and unskilled) are members of a labor union. Kollektive overenskomster means "collective bargaining" and this is the heart and soul of their economic egalitarianism. Without government interference, it is the employees and employers that negotiate salary, vacation, sick leave and maternity/paternity leave. Women cannot lose their jobs because of pregnancy and all pregnant women are entitled to paid-leave one month prior to giving birth and up to one year afterward. Professional childcare exists so that women can participate in the economy. All children are guaranteed a place in a nursery until elementary school, subsidized through taxation.

Everybody – skilled and unskilled – is formally trained in Denmark. There seems to be an ”education” for just about everything, including the execution of retail sales in department stores. Workers are entitled to upgrade their skills through courses and it is not unusual for management to send some of their staff to various courses on company time. If you lose your job, unemployment insurance protects you, giving you enough to stay inside the economic system; enough to keep you from losing your home to the bank; enough to buy groceries and prescription medicines; enough to live with dignity while you search for a new job. Losing your job in Denmark is inconvenient but not a disaster.

Work/play balance is a Danish value and people who work excessively are not admired but considered anti-social and unhealthy. Normally, everybody works 37 hours a week and gets 5-6 weeks of paid vacation in a calendar year. If you change employers, you are entitled to carry your vacation time with you.

Health care is pre-paid through taxation. Doctors are paid by the State and everyone is entitled to pick their own physician, and/or change doctors, if they choose. The first line of care is with a general practitioner who makes referrals to specialists, if necessary.  All diagnostic tests, treatments and surgery are free of extra charge and the costs of medicines are subsidized to make them affordable.

But hey! Democratic socialism is not communism. It is merely a pooling of resources to share the nation’s wealth among its citizens. Democratic socialism means that the decision makers are democratic; transparent; accessible:  Not far away; not totalitarian.

I like the Danes’ highly decentralized system of political power so that a nation of only 5.6 million people has 98 municipal districts and five administrative regions. I like the fact that MPs -  Members of Parliament - are not professional politicians but ordinary people: librarians, teachers, dentists, building contractors, accountants, journalists, etc. that represent eight different political parties, none of which, by the way, want to dismantle the welfare state.

What impresses me most about Danish political campaigns is the prohibition of television ads so that political candidates run on a level playing field and do not have to raise gargantuan sums of cash. I like the fact that the campaign period is short, not years but a matter of weeks.

Perhaps the most impressive aspect of Danish democracy is that registering to vote is not necessary. All citizens over the age of 18 automatically receive a ballot through the postal service at their home address. Voting is not compulsory, but in national elections close to 80% of all elligible voters do.

As an American, I know Denmark’s system is not applicable to the USA. Democratic socialism could only happen in Denmark because the population was homogenous with a high concentration of trust. America was founded by immigrants...from all over... folks who’ve had trust issues with ”government” from the beginning.  (There are still members of the GOP who like to sing: ”there’s no government like no government!”)  Danes do not see “the government” as an adversary but as a mirror. The Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches are fellow citizens working on their behalf.

This is what makes Denmark (and Scandinavia) different. People trust one another. The challenge is to retain this trust in a society that is no longer homogenous.

But in the meantime, Americans should stop demonizing Denmark’s system. It works.

And it makes us ”happy.”

 ~ hope you liked it ~ North

   
   If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.    (Albert Einstein)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Jan 2018 at 00:09
Interesting, thank you.  The conservative humorist PJ O'Rourke had a book (I forget which one), in which he had chapters on good socialism (Sweden) and bad socialism (...??), good capitalism (Hong Kong) and bad capitalism (Albania and Ponzi schemes), I think each system has its virtues and vices.

I do think there are people in the US who wish that the US could just be like Europe, such dreams are imo, neither realistic, nor ideal.  I think of it in terms of ecosystems, just because one kind of ecosystem is good for one kind of critter doesn't mean it would be good for others.  That of course does not mean a culture cannot 'borrow" (or steal well), from other cultures.  Xerox invented the GUI interface, but Apple and Microsoft were the ones who ran with the ball.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Jan 2018 at 03:00
I don't know much about Denmark, apart from their beautiful Crown Princess, who happened to attend the same High School that I did, but in later years of course.

From what I have seen and read, the Danes seem to be a hardworking race of people, with high moral values, what else could you wish for?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jan 2018 at 05:03
She has answered the question exactly.

"This is what makes Denmark (and Scandinavia) different. People trust one another. The challenge is to retain this trust in a society that is no longer homogenous."

Let's see how it works when half the population are money-draining migrants. Take ten years to stew in the immigration then the Danes won't talk about socialism. 
Capitalists do want more and in the getting of more, their money moves across a structure of class. People from low class can get a big opportunity as a result. Unless you are from ANTIFA you love your country .


Edited by Vanuatu - 31 Jan 2018 at 05:07
The root of all desires is the one desire: to come home, to be at peace. -Jean Klein
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jan 2018 at 23:33
Actually, Denmark, I believe, takes in more refugees than anyone else in Europe, percentage wise.  But, I think they choose that, which is admirable in some ways, but it is their decision.  I imagine that they have a strong identity culturally, and as far as indigenous population, are fairly uniform.  United States is a different situation.  The atmosphere of America resulted in Microsoft and Apple, the atmosphere of Scandinavia resulted in Linux.  You might say, it's comparing Apples and oranges.

American society is more mobile.  It is a fallacy to talk about the poor or the middle class or upper class as if they are static blocks.  There is upward, and downward mobility.  There are also a lot of people who live beyond their means.  Wealth is not how much you take in, but rather how much you take in, versus how much you pay out.

I would say that everybody thinks they love their country, it is just that they have preconceived notions about what their country is.  Although some would claim love of "the world" or "humanity" instead.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Feb 2018 at 06:32
Quote fransicosan"Actually, Denmark, I believe, takes in more refugees than anyone else in Europe"
YES BUT....
https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/01/denmark-refugees-immigration-law/431520/

But the past year brought something different. In 2015, 21,000 people sought asylum in Denmark—up from 14,815 asylum applications in 2014 and 7,557 in 2013. (Denmark happens to be sandwiched between the two most popular European destinations for today’s migrants and refugees: Germany and Sweden.) These are numbers that the Danish welfare state—which guarantees free health care and education, among other benefits, to every citizen—is struggling to handle.

Quote American society is more mobile.  It is a fallacy to talk about the poor or the middle class or upper class as if they are static blocks. 
There are studies that dispute this. About 5% of people move up or down out their class and about half of people living in poverty were born in poverty.  Maybe doesn't inspire you,  seems preferable to static class of Europe. Transcending wealth blood and family lines*NOT!
Economic mobility in the United States has, according to a host of recent studies, now fallen below European levels. Forty-two percent of American men raised in the bottom fifth of incomes never manage to move up. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, how much a dad earns is highly predictive of how much his son will earn: High-income fathers in the United States are able to transmit 47 percent of their above-average earnings to their sons; in Denmark, a father’s high earnings boost a son’s income by no more than 16 percent. 
Quote Although some would claim love of "the world" or "humanity" instead.
The world and humanity include my country. Must I mention my mother if I tell my Aunt that I love her? 
Are we allowed to love Denmark? Only America is unworthy of love?



Edited by Vanuatu - 01 Feb 2018 at 15:54
The root of all desires is the one desire: to come home, to be at peace. -Jean Klein
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2018 at 01:48
Traditionally, there has been more mobility in the United States.  That may not be true right now, I am not sure that President Trump is the answer to lesser mobility.  Does lessening regulations allow business to go more smoothly, or does it just let people take more shortcuts?  Not that Barack Obama was the answer, or Hillary Clinton for that matter.

It is a question of whether somebody's money is their money.  If it is not, the state can take it all away upon the person's death.  However, if private property means anything, it should mean that that wealth can be spent as the private individual wants it, including on heirs.  Usually, there is some compromise in between all and none.

Alexis De Touquville wrote a monograph on pauperism.  He noticed how Britain was wealthy, but had plenty of paupers, whereas, say, Spain did not.  In England there were plenty of benevolent societies, and other organizations designed to help people when they fall/fail, so a dependency grows up in response to that (learned dependency), whereas with Spain, a poor country, if you didn't work, you didn't eat.  So pauperism has no ground in Spain to grow.

You misunderstand me I believe, some people claim to love a(n abstract) notion of the "world" or "humanity," to the disparagement of their own country.  I have no idea of what it is like in, say, Zimbabwe, and not knowing, I cannot honestly say I love Zimbabwe, (I don't hate it either).  I don't love humanity either or at least I think I don't, although I do love some humans.  Humans are hard to deal with, apparently that is why the Japanese like robots so much.  I really hate the saying, "think globally, act locally."  That thinking globally can only happen if we flatten out, and pave over the very real differences that make a place, a place, and not just a location.  Viva la difference/differance(??)!   Think locally, act locally. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2018 at 14:20
Yes, I love my country and it's ok. that's BT- before Trump, before Carter even. The honor of a flag that was raised under high minded ideas, not always perfect practice I admit. It's a sacrifice for military families. There is reverence for warriors, its connected to loving your country.  

Edited by Vanuatu - 02 Feb 2018 at 15:25
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Feb 2018 at 03:50
Warriors tend to throw themselves into service of their country, right or wrong.  That is admirable, although sometimes one worries that it may be misguided.  But, their flaw is not one of a lack of commitment, and I do think that one problem for them is follow through, especially by civilian authorities.  That is true of the wars, but also of the peace, recovery from the wars.

I think that Denmark is a wonderful place, but I would not want America to be like it, nor would I like Denmark to be like America.  It would be like wanting a zebra to be like a tapir.  They live in quite different places and are adapted for them.


Edited by franciscosan - 05 Feb 2018 at 04:03
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Feb 2018 at 17:44
Maybe all resistance to change is futile when it comes to blending ethnicity. Political ideas are another matter, the US system is aware of the individual and the will of some to be very competitive economically. 
The system is so successful that millions and millions of people are able to obtain and keep basic amenities and not work at all. This is beyond socialism and within a decade there will be a living wage for most people now in low level jobs. There isn't a single state in the US where you can care for yourself and maintain a place to live working full time at minimum wage pay rate. Anyone in that situation qualifies for government assistance. Fewer and fewer people dominate economically its like going back in time.

The root of all desires is the one desire: to come home, to be at peace. -Jean Klein
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Feb 2018 at 02:24
Originally posted by Vanuatu Vanuatu wrote:

Yes, I love my country and it's ok. that's BT- before Trump, before Carter even. The honor of a flag that was raised under high minded ideas, not always perfect practice I admit. It's a sacrifice for military families. There is reverence for warriors, its connected to loving your country.  

I agree. It's possible to love one's country, without liking the people currently governing it.

Americans are among the most genuinely patriotic people in the world. And by that I mean there is no overarching political power forcing them to express patriotism.

Also, American people, while being against involvement in foreign wars, never cease to support those who walk in face of danger in their countries' name.

HOO-RAH!!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Feb 2018 at 03:13
Quote Also, American people, while being against involvement in foreign wars, never cease to support those who walk in face of danger in their countries' name.
So has Australia. The great measure of sacrifice is undeniable. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2018 at 01:13
I think America tends to make an initial commitment, but often fails to follow through, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq.  People in the US have a short attention spans, I think Europeans in general, and Danes in particular probably take a longer view.  John F Kennedy promised Americans that they could do anything and everything (whereas Dwight Eisenhower warned that there were trade offs), and we still believe (JFK) that, although that may be changing.  Europeans know better, part of that is the aristocracy imposing.

Denmark was amazing (good) in how they treated their Jewish population in World War II.  It is not a surprise that they have a kindness towards refugees.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2018 at 03:10
Another difference could be that Europeans grow up with a sense of sharing the earthscape with their neighbours, and with different cultures at their borders.

The US maybe doesn't have that outlook, being more self-centred due to it's size and importance in the world.

I think that Australia's outlook is more laid back-we have no war at our borders,no-one really threatening us and it is not at all belligerent, making for friendly neighbours, one of which is the largest Islamic country in the world.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2018 at 12:31
Europe- conquered.
Just ask the West Indies and sooo many other places. They shared the world as long as they could take all the resources and use indigenous people as free labor. No better than the US. 

Maybe the 2015 migration looks like good will from your comfy chairs, toyomotor & fransicosan but take a look online. Plenty of Europeans are really furious about migrants & Merkel's summer of RUN!
Vietnam is much too complicated to be summed up as poor planning. It was planned to a very high degree, US used one of the first computers to analyze effective strategy. Led into a war bc of European allies and abandoned in the effort by the same allies.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2018 at 15:37
V sorry, we wandered off topic there, I hope your comments are directed at Europe in general, not at Denmark.

I have a lot of respect for Angela Merkel, but I agree that she made an error throwing open the German border for so many refugees.

But, having regard to the circumstances, such a hoard of people leaving Syria and other North African countries due to the savagery caused by ISIS, but in the interests of humanity, what else could she do?

And we're getting further off topic.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2018 at 15:52
Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

V sorry, we wandered off topic there, I hope your comments are directed at Europe in general, not at Denmark.
I don't consider related topics to be off-topic.

Quote I have a lot of respect for Angela Merkel, but I agree that she made an error throwing open the German border for so many refugees.
Merkel deeply involved and effected Denmark, Norway, Sweden, England so many other countries with absolutely no discussion at the EU level. Intolerable. Yet Germany argues for the EU. 
Quote But, having regard to the circumstances, such a hoard of people leaving Syria and other North African countries due to the savagery caused by ISIS, but in the interests of humanity, what else could she do?
Merkel could have increased support for the migrants in Turkey who were being subsidized by multiple countries.
She could have petitioned the UN to provide military support for the area around the camps, maybe prevented the ISIS occupation of the area after the camps were emptied all over Europe.
She could have resisted the urge to "Virtue Signal" the world and quietly started to settle the then manageable trickle of refugees who had left Syria and Africa on foot nearly six years before the Summer of Run. There was an EU plan to do just that.

Quote And we're getting further off topic. 
Crikey


Edited by Vanuatu - 12 Feb 2018 at 15:52
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Feb 2018 at 21:47
I heard that the Danish prince(?) died recently.  My condolences.  The royalty and the aristocracy are an institution that tacitly differ from the tyranny of the masses.  It is that tyranny of the masses (and the demagogues behind them) that Americans often distrust (the progressive wing, as opposed to the populist wing of American politics).  The US does not have royalty or aristocracy per se, and we don't think about them when looking at Danish socialism.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Northman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Feb 2018 at 04:51
Yes, Prince Henrik is dead - the queens consort.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monarchy_of_Denmark


   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Feb 2018 at 05:48

A QUEEN IN WAITING MOURNS HER FATHER-IN-LAW.
It's not that I was born in Ireland,
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Northman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Feb 2018 at 11:00
Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:


A QUEEN IN WAITING MOURNS HER FATHER-IN-LAW.

She is still not a queen - but will be the most beautiful we ever had  Smile
   
   If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough.    (Albert Einstein)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Feb 2018 at 13:15
Northman

Hope you are managing OK mate.

The phrase, "Queen in Waiting, or King in Waiting" is a phrase we Anglo-Saxons use to describe the Heir Apparent to the Throne, in this case the Crown Prince. 

By extension, having regard to Denmark having a Queen (not a King) when Queen Margarethe II passes on, obviously Crown Prince Frederick will inherit the Crown of Denmark, and Princess Mary, I presume, would be his Queen Consort.

I think I read that had Prince Henrick not died, he would still not have inherited the throne, is that correct?

If it is, what would have been his position when Frederick become King? (Dowager Prince of Denmark?)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Northman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Feb 2018 at 14:41
Oh yes thank you I'm doing fine when everything is considerate.  The cancer is under control for the time being but my other problem  with my back is just killing me.

 To make it short even though it can be difficult to understand, let me try. 
If you are of royal blood like our current queen then whoever she marry - if he isn't of royal blood - then he will never become king  but some Queen's consort or something like it. That was the case with the guy who died now - prince Henrik.  Maybe due to his sickness he was quite unhappy that we couldnt make him King but that was against the Danish constitution so we couldn't do that and he knew that 50 years ago when he married her.

Crown prince Frederick Will inherit the Danish Crown and Princess Mary will become queen of Denmark and that is difference between men and women in Danish royalty - she will become the Queen - not the Kings consort when Queen Margaret dies.




Edited by Northman - 15 Feb 2018 at 17:22
   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Northman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Feb 2018 at 17:26



Next King and Queen of Denmark with their children.


Edited by Northman - 15 Feb 2018 at 17:28
   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Feb 2018 at 01:09
What does the royalty mean to most Danes?  We don't have royalty in the United States, although the way the press treat some people, some times, you would expect them to be divinely sanctioned.

Prince Henrik was French background if I recall.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Northman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Feb 2018 at 08:12
The Danish Monarchy can be traced back more than 1000 years. The Queen of Denmark, Margrethe II, is therefore able to count kings like Gorm the Old (deceased 958) and Harald Bluetooth (deceased 987) among her ancestors.

The Nearest Relations

The Queen's nearest family consists of the Royal Consort Prince Henrik, their sons, Crown Prince Frederik and Prince Joachim, Crown Princess Mary married to Crown Prince Frederik and their son Prince Christian, their daughter Princess Isabella and their twins. Prince Joachim's former wife now Countess Alexandra and their two sons Prince Nikolai and Prince Felix and Prince Joachim's wife Princess Marie and their son Prince Henrik and their daughter Princess Athena. 

The Danes and their Queen

Danes are proud of their queen and their royal monarchy. Queen Margrethe is widely respected for her intellectual prowess and her artistic abilities including working as an illustrator, set designer for the theatre and textile artist. Along with the Prince Consort, the Queen has translated French literary works into Danish and vice versa.

The Role of the Monarchy

Like other monarchies, discussion about the role and function of the monarchy takes place in Denmark. However, the general tone here is much more subdued than for example in other kingdoms.

http://denmark.dk/en/society/monarchy/
A copy from this site here where you can find a lot of other information about the Danish monarchy and royalty.


   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Feb 2018 at 23:03
In the United States, people don't trust the government, and there aren't really human national institutions that people can get behind.  Sure, Library of Congress, National Parks and Monuments, people like those, but not really human institutions that are above and beyond daily politics.

There are some people, usually sophisticates, who don't seem to have anything good to say about America, and there are people on the opposite side of the spectrum, the love-it-or-leave-its, who can't stomach anything bad to say.  Part of it though is some stuff gets said not because it is true, but because it can be used as ammunition in politics.  Propaganda is not usually false, it is usually true statements said for political effect.  United States has its own brand of propaganda, which is why it has (only) a two party system, tweddle dee, and tweddle dum.  Trading off with each other.

Does Denmark have a multi-party system??
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Northman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Feb 2018 at 04:24
   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Feb 2018 at 16:47
Can't say I speak for most Americans but I do know that numbers count and Danes are dominating some generes. US can't get enough Danish imagination. 
If I were Northman-
I'd be crowing about how much magnificent, haunting fine art was regularly churned out in Denmark 1500-1600.

Or more recently the original programming and films. If one has a penchant for thrilling crime and historical dramas, which can be had on subscription tv, then you have not missed the considerable 
Danish contribution.

Films shot anywhere in Nordic countries have a dream like quality. Too many to mention some of my favorites "Pelle the Conqueror" "Fortitude" "The Bridge" and comedies
"Men and Chicken" lol. Outstanding!

The monarchy had a bit to do with the Renaissance explosion of talent.

Maybe they contribute to that asceticism in modern tv/cinema?
The root of all desires is the one desire: to come home, to be at peace. -Jean Klein
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Feb 2018 at 20:05
I am jealous Northman, I read a book by Jacque Ellul, about Propaganda.  He talked about the Nazi, the Communist, and the American systems of propaganda.  One thing he said is that single party systems and dual party systems were created by propaganda.  btw, propaganda is not usually false, rather it is usually true but brought up in the public for political effect.  The distrust of the media by the religious right over Trump, is largely due to the fact that news is thought of as propaganda for the left.  In any case, multiple party systems, like apparently Denmark's, show that there is not the monolithic or polarizing effect of propaganda.  The United States has generally just Republicans and Democrats, Democrats or Republicans.  There are "third parties" as well, but generally they are shut out of the discourse.  
Vanuatu is right, Denmark and Scandinavia in general has an aesthetic influence in United States.  Simplicity and functionality.  I have never heard anybody complaining about Denmark being 'socialist.'  The people I know wouldn't care, because that is Denmark's business, however they do respect its sense of simplicity and functionality.
I tend to think socialism makes a certain amount of sense, where if you are outside, you would freeze to death.  Wisconsin and Minnesota kind of have a socialist attitude.  In L.A, you can sleep under the overpass year around.  Minneapolis, not so much.
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