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Myths, legends and wild stories about Animals

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Carcharodon View Drop Down
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    Posted: 08 Oct 2009 at 18:26

Myths, legends and wild stories about Animals

 
In older literature and oral tradition one can sometimes read or hear the most amazing statements about animals. Today we listen to these stories with some amusement but in older times at least some of them were taken seriously (but not all, people in those times also knew how to amuse each other with horrendous stories).

Maybe you have some old tales or beliefs about animals you want to share?


Here is one:

In elder times people in Northern Europe had no good explanation of where the Swallows went during the winter. Because of this the misconception that the swallows spent the winter under the ice of lakes were born. Even Linne took these histories somewhat seriously and wrote about them.

However, later experiments were conducted that showed that Swallows drowned when held under water. Thus the old story were debunked. And not much later one also discovered that the Swallows actually moved southward in the autumns and spent the winter in warmer countries.



Edited by Carcharodon - 09 Oct 2009 at 15:42
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Oct 2009 at 20:29
Wolfs have fascinated men for ages. Many great tales have been told about them. One such tale came from the famous American trapper and mountain man Jim Bridger (1804 to 1881). He claims that he one time was chased by a pack of wolfs so he had to climb up a tree in order to survive. For a while the wolfs stood under the tree looking at him and growling angrily. Then a couple of the wolfs took away. After a while they came back with a beaver that they forced to gnaw on the tree until it fell down.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Oct 2009 at 20:41
...and after the beaver ate away at the tree the mountain man ran away to tell his tale. Is this a tall tale?

OK. Here's one closer to home. When we used to play football in the back yard our German shepard, who was protective of little kids, got involved in the game. Each time we tried to tackle our little brother the dog would attempt to bite our ankles. In my book it should have been a 15 yard penalty. We played on anyway.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Oct 2009 at 21:52
Originally posted by Seko Seko wrote:

...and after the beaver ate away at the tree the mountain man ran away to tell his tale. Is this a tall tale?


Yes it would be one of his famous tall tales.

Originally posted by Seko Seko wrote:

. OK. Here's one closer to home. When we used to play football in the back yard our German shepard, who was protective of little kids, got involved in the game. Each time we tried to tackle our little brother the dog would attempt to bite our ankles. In my book it should have been a 15 yard penalty. We played on anyway.


Nice one, really a protective dog.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jan 2010 at 06:55
In old times the fish mackerel (Scombrus scombrus and other fish from the family scombridae) was thought of being a sort of pimp or intermediarie for smaller fish who wanted to mate. From this also comes the name mackerel. In some places a pimp is also called a mackerel.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ikki Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Feb 2010 at 12:45
In the Canary Islands we don't have snakes but big lizzards and i suspect the lizard had replaced the snake in the position of "devil animal".

We have two traditions involving women and lizards:

1. If a woman have the period, she should be aware of lizards because they can smell the blood and would try to approach the woman agressivelly sometimes climbing the legs.

2. If a woman is pregnant the lizards (and this is true too for the gekos) would try to go into the dress and they will suck the milk from the breasts.




Edited by Ikki - 17 Feb 2010 at 12:46
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Feb 2010 at 13:50
Well, I wouldn't worry for les femmes canariens, after all they could have been dragons!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Feb 2010 at 16:06
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Well, I wouldn't worry for les femmes canariens, after all they could have been dragons!
 
Well, there is actually a Dragon tree on the Canary Islands.
 
 


Edited by Carcharodon - 17 Feb 2010 at 16:07
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Feb 2010 at 19:20
In fact, Carch, I have a Dracaena draco (el drago) planted by my grandfather in the patio of the Texas ranch of which I am terribly fond. Nevertheless, the folk tale you delivered on lizards is far more prevalent than just the Canary Islands and is also found in Louisiana, Texas and Coahuila folklore as well as that of Cuba. But then those Canarios did get around. I'll let you in on a little secret, one might say it is just this factor that has provoked my ire with all the nonsense a certain poster seeks to propagate over the Maghreb and genetics.
 
PS:
 
A salamander from your neck of the woods.


Edited by drgonzaga - 17 Feb 2010 at 19:25
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Dec 2010 at 11:46
In tropical seas you can find a fish that is called Remora or suckerfish. It attach itself onto larger fishes, sea turtles or sea mammals and it lives from leftover fragments from the meals of its hosts.
In older times there was a belief that these fishes could stop ships from sailing. In Wiki one can read this little funny notice about this fascinating creature:
 
Quote In ancient times, the remora was believed to stop a ship from sailing. In Latin remora means delay, while the genus name Echeneis comes from Greek echein (to hold) and naus (a ship). Particularly notable is the account of Pliny the Younger, in which the remora is blamed for the defeat of Mark Antony at the Battle of Actium and (indirectly) for the death of Caligula.
 


Edited by Carcharodon - 01 Dec 2010 at 13:43
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