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Nanking Trajedy

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Lao Tse View Drop Down
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    Posted: 20 Jun 2012 at 15:52
Although I lived in a very small village, my family was spread as far north as Manchukuo, as far east as Tokyo,as far south as Red Cliff, and as far west as Tibet. When I was very young, we recieved word from my uncle in Shanghai that the Japanese army had invaded Shanghai and burned it almost to the ground. He came to live with us for a few days while my cousin was coming home from Tokyo. Within a month later, we received word that my cousin was caught trying to go to Nanking to save my older sister. About 2 weeks later, we heard on the radio that Nanking had been attacked. For days, weeks even, all we heard was that the Japanese were attacking Nanking. By the next year, I was sent to Peking so that my parents would shield me from knowing what happened. I did not know what happened until we were reunited with my niece.
 
I will never forget the day I got on the train back to my village in Hebei Province. I was so happy that I was going to see my sister and niece again! But When I arrived, all I saw was a little girl at the train station who was waiting for me. My niece decided that she would tell me what happened to my sister instead of my parents telling me. On the 6th day of bombing, the factory where my sister used to work was bombed until the structure fell apart. Luckily, Beixi was not in the factory because her shifts were changed. When the Japanese broke their way into the ruined city, my sister was in the street, looking for her little girl. I never saw my sister, Beixi, again, after Shanglei, my niece was born. But Shanghei and I lived through the war.
 
My grandparents in Manchukuo were used as basically lab rats while Amakasu Masahiko continually corrupted Pu Yi, the puppet emperor, until they were "released" a few months after the end of the war.  While Shanghei and I went with my parents and uncle into hiding in Tibet, my cousin, Chun, was sent to prison until released by the Japanese government. He went on to work as a therapist.
 
Shanghei now is on her own, living a few blocks away so I can keep an eye on that mischievious little baboon. There are only 3 of us left, and we will never forget the trajedy of Beixi in Nanking.
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fusong View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fusong Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jun 2012 at 16:25
Welcome to our forum!

It is not very often we get actual eye witness accounts of historical events on here,
that being said I cannot imagine Nanking and the Japanese Invasion, it must had been truly terrible..
Every ideology has a kernel of truth and sea of whitewash.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Buckskins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jun 2012 at 21:39
Ask a European when WW2 started and he will say 1939. They even accuse us Americans of being late. The fact of the matter is that what Japan was doing prior to 1939 was no secret. I guess the Chinese were unworthy of our intervention.
May you live as long as you want to,
and may you want to as long as you live.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Lao Tse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jun 2012 at 23:13
It is actually suprising how early the wars actually started. Japan's invasion of Manchuria was  new beginning of wars for China, the Sino-Japanese wars were more of another way to prolong China's civil wars with the Kuomingtang in the south, and the Warlords in the north. It was Japan's way of trying to conquer all of Asia. They already had Korea kowtowing, and by the fall of Nanking, Japan controlled Shanghai, Manchuria (puppet state of Manchukuo), Nanking (with several villages between Nanking and Shanghai), Korea, and several islands in southeast Asia.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote fusong Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jun 2012 at 23:39
Originally posted by Buckskins Buckskins wrote:

Ask a European when WW2 started and he will say 1939. They even accuse us Americans of being late. The fact of the matter is that what Japan was doing prior to 1939 was no secret. I guess the Chinese were unworthy of our intervention.


The Russians the British, the Greeks, the Austrians, the Luxembargins,  the Dutch, the French, the Polish, the Norse, the Yugloslavs, the Bulgars, the Belgians, the Croats,  the Czecks, the Spanish (if you count the the three year civil war thats all according to your taste) were all unworthy of intervention until we were directly attacked.



 
Every ideology has a kernel of truth and sea of whitewash.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jun 2012 at 00:33
What happened at Nanking demonstrates that Japanese methods were no less brutal than those of the Nazis. Ironically it was a Nazi, John Rabe, who led the fight to establish a protective zone within the city for civilians. This is estimated to have saved hundreds of thousands of lives.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lao Tse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jun 2012 at 01:26
Another Irony is that John Rabe is the one who saved Shanglei. Had he not been there, my niece would not have seen beyond the Walls of Nanking.

Edited by Lao Tse - 09 Apr 2013 at 02:51
在財富的害處,而是一件好事永遠不持續。我在和平中仅居住在新的風下。 Wei Jia Hong No harm in wealth, but a good thing doesn't last forever. I live only among peace under
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Panther Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jun 2012 at 02:17
Originally posted by fusong fusong wrote:

Welcome to our forum!

It is not very often we get actual eye witness accounts of historical events on here,
that being said I cannot imagine Nanking and the Japanese Invasion, it must had been truly terrible..


I agree, very fascinating to have an actual eyewitness offer to share their stories. I hope i'm not sounding too rude by asking, but how old were you Lao Tse when this had taken place?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lao Tse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jun 2012 at 02:23
It is not rude at all. I was 9 years old when I was sent to Peking while Nanking was invaded by land forces. My sister was around 25 and Shanghei was 4.
在財富的害處,而是一件好事永遠不持續。我在和平中仅居住在新的風下。 Wei Jia Hong No harm in wealth, but a good thing doesn't last forever. I live only among peace under
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Panther Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jun 2012 at 02:38
Thank you. Your sister was 25. So young and had a full life ahead of her that would go unfulfilled and unexplored. I know she lives on in the memories of her loved ones, but i still would like to offer my condolences to you, that you had to carry such a burden of needless loss in your life for so long.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lao Tse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jun 2012 at 02:58
Thanks, she was very close to me and our father, we were in a state of shock when we heard. Atleast justice prevailed in the end.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lao Tse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Jun 2012 at 13:20
My cousin e-mailed me a picture of her house in Nanking from when she was living.
 From left: Sister Beixi, Father, and cousin.
在財富的害處,而是一件好事永遠不持續。我在和平中仅居住在新的風下。 Wei Jia Hong No harm in wealth, but a good thing doesn't last forever. I live only among peace under
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jun 2012 at 03:10
Originally posted by Lao Tse Lao Tse wrote:

Thanks, she was very close to me and our father, we were in a state of shock when we heard. Atleast justice prevailed in the end.


Very interesting, and welcome to the forum. A question. Have you seen the movie "The last emperor"? If so, how close to the real events was that story?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lao Tse Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jun 2012 at 03:28
I have seen "The Last Emperor", and I think that for the most part, it is very accurate. The only inaccuracies were that the empress Wanrong was never pregnant, Cixi did not die the day of her decision to make Pu Yi Emperor but 2 days later, there was no Colonel Yoshioka (but Yoshioka is a royal clan in Japan), and the scene with the introductions of Japanese generals at the ball never took place in that building (infact, Pu Yi never used that building fearing that it was bugged.) Hope this helps!

Edited by Lao Tse - 27 Jun 2012 at 10:09
在財富的害處,而是一件好事永遠不持續。我在和平中仅居住在新的風下。 Wei Jia Hong No harm in wealth, but a good thing doesn't last forever. I live only among peace under
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