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New Dragon

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    Posted: 22 Jun 2012 at 10:15
        This afternoon, I received a small package from Beijing. I was suprised to see a package from Beijing because the only person I know who lives in Beijing is my main employer. When I removed the wrapping, there was a small box approx. 5.5 inches long with golden writing of the brand-name in both English and Chinese. When I opened the final layer of packing, wrapped in golden silk, was a relatively small dragon. It took me a moment to realize what it was, but when I did, I was pleasently shocked! The five-clawed dragon which was wrapped in golden silk? That meant that whoever gave me the dragon was very important.
         The dragon, according to chinese mythology, is atleast 1,500 years old. It can be detailed that the dragon is at this age because she has the Pearl of Wisdom in her right hand. Another detail is that she is a dragon of water because she is mounted upon waves. It is noted that the dragon is actually female. The gender of a dragon in China is by their tail. The male dragon, which is extremely rare, is portrayed by artists to have a pointed or clubbed tail. The common female dragon, however, is portrayed by artists to have a fanned tail, like the dragon which I have been given. The five-clawed dragon is most often meaning importance and the male of a high rank, whether or not the dragon is actually female or male. While their counter part is a Phoenix, which often means a high ranking female, such as an Empress or Consort. The only actuall male dragons that are know are the dragon kings, or Long Wang a.k.a Wanglong depending on dialect.
I have already decided a name for her: Long Jia Hong Lan (meaning Auspicious Red Orchid Dragon)
Sorry, but the file for the pictures are too large for the Forum's uploading system (438k instead of 100k max each). I'll try to shorten the file images.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mable01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Sep 2012 at 17:45
However it was small but you must have been surprised so badly after seeing this dragon. Can I see the picture of that small dragon here?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Sep 2012 at 18:36
Ok, here it is;
 
 Pic No. 1, she is about 5 inches long.
 
Pic No. 2, the box is 6 inches long, with imperial yellow held in by a slab of cardboard.
 
Pic No. 3, this is the company name, pressed on the box (I know it's simple, but it is pretty!)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Sep 2012 at 12:11
The dragon is quite beautiful and exotic, thanks for showing this,
could talk more about Chinese Dragons please?, I know very little about them..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Sep 2012 at 09:33
I myself don't know that much about them, but I can tell you what I do know!
Chinese Dragons differ from other Eaastern style dragons by the number of claws. According to Chinese mythology, the Dragon originated in China, but when it went to Japan, it lost a claw, and went to Korea, only to lose another claw, and if the dragon lost all of her claws, she would die, which is why in China, Dragons typically have 5 claws, in Japan 4, and in Korea 3. There are many stories of Dragons having a temper and being punished because of that. My favorite story was that of Liu and the Dragon King.
 
The story goes: Liu had passed the Imperial Examinations, and was on the road back to his home to say farewell to his family and friends. As he was walking, he saw a beautiful woman crying on the side of the road while she was with a flock of sheep. He stopped and asked what was wrong. The woman said: I am married to the Dragon King of the Ching River, and he is cruel to me while I am kind. I have my flock of seeing spirits with me, but they cannot become horses so I could get home to tell my father. So I can't get home in time. You appear to be heading that way, could you help me?
 
Liu Yi was very suprised who she was, and was unsure which Dragon would be least likely to kill him if he angered them. But Liu willingly replied: The Tong Ting Lake is in the village where I am going, so I can, and am willing, to preform such task. But there is one problem, I am a mere mortal, and cannot breathe under water. Do you know if there is a way to enter your father's palace for mortals?
 
The woman wiped away her tears, and joyously replied: There is a way, but you must follow these instructions carefully, and exactly. There is a tree with dying lower branches. Tie your belt to the lowest branche, and knock on the trunk 3 times. Two tall men will appear out of the water of the lake, and a shallow passage will appear from the water.
 
Liu said that he would complete this task with no further delay, and went on his way. He reached the tree and followed the instructions, and, as expected, the two guards came. as he entered the palace, he saw a very tall, and rather rouded figure man in the main hall. The man said: Welcome to my palace! Have you heard any news of my youngest daughter?
Liu, terrified and unsure what to say, replied: I have.
As Liu told the Dragon King of the events in the household of the Ching River, the Dragon King, servants, and even consorts in their appartments were weaping. Suddenly, a massive roar from the East Wing caused Liu to fall to the floor. As he was about to shut his eyes to prevent seeing the horror of whatever it was that was causing this awful noise, he saw a black dragon, angrilly stomping out the gate. After the dragon left, Liu was almost about to faint. The Dragon King finally calmed him down enough to convince Liu of staying in the palace for a few days. The Dragon King explained: You do not have to fear my brother! If it were not for you, we would be unaware of my daughter's unhappiness! I hope Yudi forgives him this time. He was about to be turned into a mortal, and I agreed to keep him in line.
 
On the final day of Liu's visit, there was a feast held in his honor. He recognized the serving girl, it was the Princess. Finally, the brother- Dragon returned, as a human appearance, and was scolded for killing 80000 mortals in the process of eating the King of the Ching River. Close to the end of the feast, Brother-Dragon offered the Princess' hand in marriage. Unfortunately, Lui respectfully declined, fearing that he would displease the Long Wang, and he had a sad farewell with the reward of a massive sum of money for his services.
 
A few years later, he married a woman that he met at a market, near the village. But as time progressed, she looked more and more familliar. She finally revealed her identity, the Dragon Princess. Many people marvelled at him as he gained in age, but not in appearance. After many years of happiness, Liu, now immortal, went to live in the lake with the rest of his family, who would never die. It is said that Liu can still be seen along the edge of the lake. 


Edited by Lao Tse - 13 Sep 2012 at 13:20
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Sep 2012 at 10:31
What time period is the story from?

Thank you! Its hard to find such stories,  though it seems to be a major theme in Chinese stories to help a begger or a distressed woman and then receive lavish rewards out of it. I am kind of a little stricken how little the story seems to view of human life "Yes I scolded my brother for killing 80,000 villagers thats just a few after all..."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Sep 2012 at 12:08
I think this story origins from the Song Dynasty. I was lucky that my mother actually listened to these stories, since Manchus don't usually hear, or choose to listen to, the stories of the days before the Jin jurchen people. There are several hundred more that I've recorded and copied from memory. The only problem is some of these long names! Here's another story called The Great Dragon's Pearl
One day, as usual, Tao Yun walked his route to the normal fields that he reaped and sold the grass at barely enough to by rice for him and his mother, whom he lived with in a small house in the village. As he reaped the usual fields, he noticed that another field nearby had the greenest grass he had ever seen. While Yun gathered this grass, he saw a huge shimmer of light coming from under some of the grass.
 
As he reached the shimmer, he saw, to his absolute amazement, it was a golden pearl, unattended by any dragon. he quickly gathered the grass, and the pearl, and went home to show his mother. To see if the pearl was magic, they put one blade of grass in the field behind their house, and placed the pearl ontop of it. The next morning, the entire field was covered in the thick green grass, even taller thtn the previous day. They made even more money that day because they were able to supply the most green grass during a drought. The mother wanted to try to make even more money, and even more food, so she put 3 taels in a plain, wooden box, and placed the pearl on the largest of the 3 taels. She opened the box later in the day, and it was filled with money, and the pearl was on top of the money. Yun wanted more for dinner, so he placed the last grain of rice in a jar, and put the pearl on top of it. They watched for a moment, and the rice had overflowed the jar, and the pearl, as usual, was on top of the pile.
 
The neighbors grew suspicious about Yun not having to reap grass anymore, they were suddenly rich, and no longer had to go to the market for rice, so they all went to see what was going on. As they demanded to know what caused them to be so rich, Yun reluctantly showed them the pearl. He watched them carefully, making sure greed wouldn't take over their minds. The villagers began to attempt snatching the pearl out of Yun's hand, so Yun quickly shut his hands. As the neighbors were trying to convince him to open his hands, Yun finally ate the pearl.
 
He felt a burning sensation down his throat, and stomach, and drank water by the bucket until even the well ran out of water. His only escape was the river, and he almost drank all of it. Yun started growing a tail, and scales, and other serpent features. He was turning into a dragon before his mother's eyes. Suddenly, as though he were possessed, Yun slowly walked into the river, and his tail made mud banks as a wave goodbye to his mother. According to legend, these mudbanks are still along the edge of the river, and they are called: final goodbye to Dragon Mother.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mable01 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Sep 2012 at 17:18
Originally posted by Lao Tse Lao Tse wrote:

Ok, here it is;
 
 Pic No. 1, she is about 5 inches long.
 
Pic No. 2, the box is 6 inches long, with imperial yellow held in by a slab of cardboard.
 
Pic No. 3, this is the company name, pressed on the box (I know it's simple, but it is pretty!)


Thanks for sharing Smile . I'm just amazed to see the first one which is only 5 inches long. Shocked
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Oct 2012 at 10:55
Originally posted by Lao Tse Lao Tse wrote:

I think this story origins from the Song Dynasty. I was lucky that my mother actually listened to these stories, since Manchus don't usually hear, or choose to listen to, the stories of the days before the Jin jurchen people. There are several hundred more that I've recorded and copied from memory. The only problem is some of these long names! Here's another story called The Great Dragon's Pearl
One day, as usual, Tao Yun walked his route to the normal fields that he reaped and sold the grass at barely enough to by rice for him and his mother, whom he lived with in a small house in the village. As he reaped the usual fields, he noticed that another field nearby had the greenest grass he had ever seen. While Yun gathered this grass, he saw a huge shimmer of light coming from under some of the grass.
 
As he reached the shimmer, he saw, to his absolute amazement, it was a golden pearl, unattended by any dragon. he quickly gathered the grass, and the pearl, and went home to show his mother. To see if the pearl was magic, they put one blade of grass in the field behind their house, and placed the pearl ontop of it. The next morning, the entire field was covered in the thick green grass, even taller thtn the previous day. They made even more money that day because they were able to supply the most green grass during a drought. The mother wanted to try to make even more money, and even more food, so she put 3 taels in a plain, wooden box, and placed the pearl on the largest of the 3 taels. She opened the box later in the day, and it was filled with money, and the pearl was on top of the money. Yun wanted more for dinner, so he placed the last grain of rice in a jar, and put the pearl on top of it. They watched for a moment, and the rice had overflowed the jar, and the pearl, as usual, was on top of the pile.
 
The neighbors grew suspicious about Yun not having to reap grass anymore, they were suddenly rich, and no longer had to go to the market for rice, so they all went to see what was going on. As they demanded to know what caused them to be so rich, Yun reluctantly showed them the pearl. He watched them carefully, making sure greed wouldn't take over their minds. The villagers began to attempt snatching the pearl out of Yun's hand, so Yun quickly shut his hands. As the neighbors were trying to convince him to open his hands, Yun finally ate the pearl.
 
He felt a burning sensation down his throat, and stomach, and drank water by the bucket until even the well ran out of water. His only escape was the river, and he almost drank all of it. Yun started growing a tail, and scales, and other serpent features. He was turning into a dragon before his mother's eyes. Suddenly, as though he were possessed, Yun slowly walked into the river, and his tail made mud banks as a wave goodbye to his mother. According to legend, these mudbanks are still along the edge of the river, and they are called: final goodbye to Dragon Mother.


Sorry for not responding for a while I have been busy,

So the dragons became dragons because of preventing greed? Interesting this parable predictably I think holds Confucian values at least from how I understand them, though you would think a good theme that I think would have fit with Chinese culture with the farmer giving everything he had away to his neighbors and then being rewarded later, kind of like your last story..

Thank you again for this Smile
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