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new site about medieval architecture

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janusz692 View Drop Down
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    Posted: 12 Jan 2018 at 16:10

I invite you to a new website dedicated to the monuments of medieval and antiquity https://www.medievalheritage.eu
please write comments and observations
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toyomotor View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Jan 2018 at 11:09

From http://www.ebaumsworld.com/videos/how-did-ancient-romans-lift-transport-900-ton-stones/85562128/.

Quote How Did Ancient Romans Lift & Transport 900 Ton Stones?
The Trilithon Stones are three stones that make up part of a temple in Baalbek Lebanon, and are estimated to weigh 900 tons and were moved 1/2 mile uphill to the building site.




[quote] fromhttps://www.atlasobscura.com/places/baalbek-trilithon 

There were many stone movers in the ancient world. From Stonehenge to Macchu Piccu, ancient peoples found a way to move stones of massive proportions. The Olmec of Central America moved enormous stone heads, possibly by floating them down rivers on rafts. The Inca created mountaintop kingdoms out of enormous yet intricately fitted stones, each dragged for dozens of miles. Easter Islanders carved and moved some of the largest stone sculptures ever created.

The largest hewn stone yet discovered, however, was not found in any of these places, but in the Lebanese town of Baalbeck, in the ruins of a city once known as Heliopolis, “the City of the Sun.”

In the base of the ruins of the Jupiter Baal Temple lie three hewn stones known together as the “trilithon.” Each is estimated to weigh over 750 tons. Construction on the massive Roman temple of Jupiter began roughly 27 years before the birth of Jesus, and while most scholars agree the blocks were cut by the Romans, there is some evidence that the trilithon may predate their presence in the Middle East. In fact, the stones may predate even Alexander the Great, who founded Heliopolis in 334 BCE.

Whether Roman masons or some other group, someone devised a way to move these massive blocks from the quarry over many miles, and to then lift them onto a base of smaller blocks. In addition to the trilithon, there is a fourth stone in the temple, the largest of them all—indeed, the largest stone ever hewn by man.

Known as the “Stone of the Pregnant Woman,” it weighs an estimated 1,200 tons—equivalent to three Boeing 747s. This massive weight apparently proved too much for anyone to move, and the stone was left in place where it was cut, an enormous rectangle sticking up at an angle from the ground.

How Roman architects (or whoever it was that moved the trilithon) ever thought they would move such an enormous block remains a source of much debate.[quote]


Now, but me no buts. Who else but aliens could have done it? And before you launch an argument, please watch the video at http://www.ebaumsworld.com/videos/how-did-ancient-romans-lift-transport-900-ton-stones/85562128/



Edited by toyomotor - 22 Jan 2018 at 11:28
It's not that I was born in Ireland,
It's the Ireland that was born in me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Jan 2018 at 11:32
Originally posted by janusz692 janusz692 wrote:


I invite you to a new website dedicated to the monuments of medieval and antiquity https://www.medievalheritage.eu
please write comments and observations

I didn't realise your link was confined to Poland and Slovaki before I posted.

You may still find it interesting.
It's not that I was born in Ireland,
It's the Ireland that was born in me.
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janusz692 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote janusz692 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Feb 2018 at 15:52
Medieval monuments of Estonia have been added to the site

https://medievalheritage.eu/en/main-page/heritage/estonia/

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janusz692 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote janusz692 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Mar 2018 at 14:56
From today, medieval monuments of Latvia available on the site:

https://medievalheritage.eu/en/main-page/heritage/latvia/
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Martin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Martin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Jun 2018 at 18:29
Great website, congrats! :)
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janusz692 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote janusz692 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jul 2018 at 18:16
I finished work on monuments from the area of Wales, altogether more than three hundred castles, monasteries, abbeys, churches, neolithic burial chambers and many more appeared on the site. I invite you to familiarize yourself with such wonderful monuments as castles in Caernarfon, Pembroke, or Chepstow, the Roman fort of Venta Silurium (Caerwent), the burial chamber of Bryn Celli Ddu or the medieval bishop’s palaces in St Davids and Llandew.

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