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Occupied Ireland.

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Windemere View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Windemere Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Feb 2014 at 20:31
Here is a bit of background information about the Fethard-on-Sea boycott, which took place in 1957. Fethard-on-Sea is a small town in County Wexford, Ireland. There was a Catholic husband and a Church of Ireland Protestant wife, who both came from local families, and had 2 young daughters. The father wanted his children to attend the local Catholic school, and the mother didn't want them to attend that school. It was an ordinary family disagreement until the local clergy became involved. The local Catholic parish priest, evidently a zealous authoritarian, told the mother that, because she'd previously agreed to raise the children as Catholics, they needed to attend the Catholic school, whether she liked it or not. The mother, who was apparently an independent-minded woman, resented the priest telling her what to do. The Protestant parson urged her to stand her ground, and not give in to the priest. The mother eventually became frustrated, packed up her children, and left town, heading to Scotland. At that point, the two religious communities in town, Catholic and Protestant, each blamed the other for having caused the family's break-up, and for having caused the mother to leave town with her children. The Catholic priest organized a Catholic boycott of local Protestant-owned businesses, and the bishop of the Catholic diocese supported him on the boycott. Most Catholic residents participated in the boycott, whether out of religious conviction, group solidarity, or peer-pressure, although there were also Catholic residents who didn't participate. The boycott did cause some harm to the local Protestant-owned businesses.
 
The Irish government, and the Taoiseach (prime-minister),DeValera, publicly condemned the boycott. That was the extent of what they could do, as a boycott is a legal, time-honored method of expressing dissent for those who wish to participate in it. The Irish press, newspapers, etc., also mostly opposed the boycott, and it received unfavorable publicity.
 
The father left town, and joined his wife and children in Scotland, where the husband and wife were reconciled. They lived abroad for awhile, before eventually returning to Fetherton. Later on, they had another child. None of the 3 children attended any school, and they ended up being home-schooled.
 
The boycott does show the influence of the Catholic Church in the local community in the 1950s, but it also shows the Church's lack of influence over the government.


Edited by Windemere - 25 Feb 2014 at 21:03
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"Beware of martyrs and those who would die for their beliefs; for they frequently make many others die with them, often before them, sometimes instead of them."
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toyomotor View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Feb 2014 at 21:28
Thanks for that.

Both sides were wrong, it was a family decision, and the clergy should have kept their noses OUT!

The boycott was wrong, it should never have happened.

The State will never succeed over religion where the congregation is so devout.
It's not that I was born in Ireland,
It's the Ireland that was born in me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kevinmeath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Feb 2014 at 22:30
Interestingly of those Catholics who did not support the boycott were often ex-IRA men from the war of Independence/Civil War.

Partly because they were often socialists and so didn't like the Catholic Church, partly because the IRA 1918-22 was not (on the whole there were notable exceptions to say the least) sectarian and also in a
part they were not the sort of men you tried to intimidate.
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toyomotor View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Feb 2014 at 23:12
I would have thought the IRA would have been more Nationalist than socialist.

But they did befriend anyone who would support their cause with money or firearms.
It's not that I was born in Ireland,
It's the Ireland that was born in me.
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Windemere View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Windemere Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Feb 2014 at 16:22
Well, ever since 1918 the I.R.A. has been both nationalist and socialist. Back in the old days it had a very socialist economic philosophy, and it still has a somewhat socialist world-view. I think that nowadays Sinn Fein is balancing Irish  nationalism with practical  realpolitik and the realities of the northern cultural, traditional, and historical situation. I think that  the Orange Order may be gradually doing the same thing.

Edited by Windemere - 26 Feb 2014 at 16:23
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toyomotor View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Feb 2014 at 21:31
Originally posted by Windemere Windemere wrote:


Well, ever since 1918 the I.R.A. has been both nationalist and socialist. Back in the old days it had a very socialist economic philosophy, and it still has a somewhat socialist world-view. I think that nowadays Sinn Fein is balancing Irish  nationalism with practical  realpolitik and the realities of the northern cultural, traditional, and historical situation. I think that  the Orange Order may be gradually doing the same thing.


Now all we need is for the two sides to maintain agreements and all should go well, although the recent couple of violent incidents need to be dealt with, internally if necessary.

The Good Friday Agreement will soon crumble if one side or the other returns to the bad old days.
It's not that I was born in Ireland,
It's the Ireland that was born in me.
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