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Perception of Indians

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 05:39
To be fair Cahaya was provocative, since the difference between pop junk and classical is a pretty big deal in terms of talent and spirituality to the extent that it is a way of life for the musician and it is a very emotive thing for people who appreciate them and their music.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 05:40
Originally posted by Mangel_Pandey Mangel_Pandey wrote:

Originally posted by es_bih es_bih wrote:


And the not so serious thread turned into slight racism already?


Racism? how? serious? how so?

All I said was this thread is about Indians and not Pakis. How else am I supposed to phrase that sentence?
Well, to start with you could at least say 'Pakistanis'.
Quote

Isn't it a fact? What I said.
Actually no, it isn't, because other people don't define 'Indian' the way you do. Hosts of people perceive citizens of Pakistan as Indian, so the general perception of 'Indians' includes them (and indeed Sri Lankans too and even the Nepalese.
 
If you want to define 'Indian' in a particular way for a particular discussion then it's up to you to do so. It's also up to you to provide some sensible basis for the definition (as for instance 'citizens of the Republic of India' would be a reasonably clear one with no racist baggage.)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mangel_Pandey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 06:02
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Originally posted by Mangel_Pandey Mangel_Pandey wrote:

Originally posted by whalebreath whalebreath wrote:

I like Indian food but they always cook with too much salt.
Theres no such a thing as "Indian food" as there is no such a thing as "Indian language" or "Indian race". The only "Indian" thing about all "Indians" is that we come from India.


You mean just like all Europeans come from Europe, all Germans from Germany, all Italians from Italy, all Fijians from Fiji, all Americans from America?



The natives of all these regions are easily identifiable based solely on their looks. Like for example a rosy white skinned Europid individual is most likely of European descent.

Indians are not easily identifiable. There are at times where even I have presumed a Somalian for a Tamil, a Spaniard for a North West Indian and North East Indian for an East Asian.

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

You're assuming a whole number of things (as is anyone who thinks all the propositions I just made are well-defined, let alone true), paramount among them the need for there to be a continuing well-defined meaning for the geographical entity (as 'Iberia' and 'Britain' have but 'Spain' and 'England' don't).


Yes but atleast all of traditional Europe is defined by the mostly White Europeans who inhabit it. That's not tne case of Indian.

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Confusing ethnic and racial classifications with geographical ones doesn't get you very far either. You can come from Brixton and be African, and a long time ago I had a teenage girlfriend who came from Southampton but was Goanese (and therefore 'Indian').


I thnk you are missing the point here. Yes in today's globalized world anyone can look like anything and be from anywhere. But... I specifically mean "traditional" looks of Indians before the last century(globalization). What a typical French, a typical Pekinger, a typical Sudanese looks like etc and in that vein the assumption of what a stereotypical "Indian" should like.

The only "Indian" thing about the different foods of the different regions of India is the use of spice and curry. But so is spice cooked all over South Asia(including Iran, Afghanistan) and South East Asia.

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Actually that's not true, especially of the way rice is normally prepared. Look for instance at the difference between an Iranian polo and an Indian biryani.


Heh, lol see that's what I'm talking about. Rice is almost completely omitted in the cuisine of North West India where Roti(bread) is staple.

In South India on the other hand they completely omit Roti and eat rice and rice based foods as an integral part of their diet.

Briyana itself was brought into India by possibly Parsis and is traditional food of Indian Muslims and not Hindus.

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

More generally though, of course spices are used all over Asia. They're all over everywhere. What matters is the way the spices are used. If you want something that adds up to being typically Indian you'd be better off discussing the use of cheese since Indian cooking, like Chinese, makes no use of coagulated-protein cheeses, but, unlike Chinese, uses fromages frais in the form of paneer.[QUOTE]Try going to an authentic Tamil cuisine restaurant and an authentic Muslim Kashmiri cuisine restaurant, you'll see what I'm talking about.


Its likely also that paneer was spread to India by Persians and/or Muslims.

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Of course they'd probably be different. Go to a local restaurant in Toulouse and another in Metz and they'll be immediately distinguishable. But they'd both be well within the gambit of what one recognises as French cuisine. In fact try asking for a boilermaker in Plymouth and another in Newcastle (assuming they haven't been blanded out of existence) and you'll get a different drink, but they'll both be English beers, and recognisably so.


North West Indian food is far closer to Iranian and Afghan food than it is to South Indian food. Like the basmati rice, naan/bread, paneer, kebab/stewed meat. Tea is called chai in both Indic and Farsi... and I don't even know anything about Persian cuisine to begin with. If I did I can make a far better comparison.

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

The thing is, that with your Tamil and Muslim Kashmiri restaurants, the overwhelming majority of people would have no difficulty in recognisinig both of them as 'Indian'.


No. Put Tamil, Malay, Iranian and Kashmiri dishes together and I can bet no one who knows anything about each cuisine can tell exactly which is which.

Edited by Mangel_Pandey - 11 Dec 2009 at 06:11
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mangel_Pandey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 06:09
Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:


But I have heard it as an abbreviation amongst Indians and Pakistanis themselves who actually live in S Asia so that is why I assumed u were using it n that context.


Precisely, this "Paki" = n-word thing is very new to me and I find it hilarious.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dolphin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 06:20
It's okay for a Pakistani to refer to a Pakistani as "paki" in Europe.., ala ngr in America?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 06:39
It's not a la ngr.  They are abbreviating whereas ngr is no abbreviation of the word as it sounds.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dolphin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 06:57

The question I was quickly, and mostly uninterestedly asking, is whether or not the two terms, which have been identified together twice in the discussion so far, can be used as terms of identity, reference, or affiliation between members of the referred community, ie. Pakistanis or African-Americans. 

Writing ala ngr, may be deemed CONTROVERSIAL to some, with its inherent flippancy and the use of a three-letter string that does nothing to hide the taboo term that it refers to. If i had written n****r, or some other purty euphemism, I'm sure things would have turned out differently. But, to be honest, I wasn't originally in the mood to press the shift key down while I tapped the 8 button, so ngr it was. Even an abbreviatory reduction to pehs and nehs would be insulting, so maybe it's better not to say anything at all.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 07:02
Originally posted by Mangel_Pandey Mangel_Pandey wrote:

...
The natives of all these regions are easily identifiable based solely on their looks. Like for example a rosy white skinned Europid individual is most likely of European descent.

Indians are not easily identifiable. There are at times where even I have presumed a Somalian for a Tamil, a Spaniard for a North West Indian and North East Indian for an East Asian. .
 
Confused
 
I have been confussed with Greek and my wife with Chinese... And we aren't Indians! Confused
And I know many of my countryfellows who could be confussed with European, too.


Edited by pinguin - 11 Dec 2009 at 07:03
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 07:07
Originally posted by Mangel_Pandey Mangel_Pandey wrote:

Originally posted by cahaya cahaya wrote:

to be specific.... Bipasha ? Malikka...?? Ermm... Kareena... bla bla bla...


You know I don't know why but I don't really like S.E.Asians very much especially those from Malaysia, Vietnam/Laos and Philipines. Now I am not trying to be prejudiced or anything. But its just based on my experience, they tend to be the most ignorant.

And you have proven my generalization by equating some cheap sluts to something as refined and highy respected as Indian traditional music.

Now I don't quite blame you because coming from where you are and your family upbringing, such mindset might be the norm. But that's not how certain Indians feel, especially since our traditional music has religious significance as well.

You should learn to stfu when you have nothing better to say. Trust me, you'll be appreciated better that way.

Pardon me for me if I'm being harsh.

I come from a certain section of Hindu society who are very particular about our culture.

I don't know what kind of Indians you have met. Maybe you are some Malay from Singapore who is used to seeing bastardization of Aryan culture by tamil coolies.

This may be new to you, just to let you know;

Indians from a certain section of the Hindu society, don't take sh*t from anyone. And if you hurt us in any way, be sure that we'll take our revenge and serve you double the dose.

Peace.


There you go... the perception of Indians.... Wink How can you blame on others?Tongue



@Zag.. Provocative? come on. Did I sound like that? Shocked

Mangel Saab.. mind your language.

Oh ya.. by the way...  May I know which Malay girl broke your heart? Singaporean?



Edited by cahaya - 11 Dec 2009 at 07:25
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 07:28
Yeah it seemed a bit flippant and could easily be confused with mockery, but regardless, this in no way excuses his words.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote whalebreath Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 13:25
Quote Hosts of people perceive citizens of Pakistan as Indian, so the general perception of 'Indians' includes them (and indeed Sri Lankans too and even the Nepalese.

Yes many of us consider anyone of origin on the Indian subcontinent to be an  'Indian'.


Edited by whalebreath - 11 Dec 2009 at 13:27
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Harburs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 16:05
Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:

I love curry and my girlfriend's Pakistani.  I'm onto a winner.
I thought your gf is Kurdish. anyhow, your sentence reminded me of Mr. Bean's speech as a conservative representative about Indian immigrants. He said "... we like the curry, but now that we have got the recipes, is there really any need for them to stay..."Wink < id="gwProxy" ="">

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Joze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 18:04
Hy to   all!
Well  dear  Cahaya   from   SE Asia,  i  live  in   very  small   country Slowenia,  this  is  in   middle  Europe. I  know  25   years friends from my  nearest  "big"  town  Maribor  (ab. 200 000 people) and  they  make old  traditional instruments (ethno) from all ower  the    world. They   are realy  good! :) But some  others   have their own music teachers  IN  INDIA and  they   travel  to   the   India 3 - 4 times  in  Year  to   study   and   to   learn   the ragas  in   India (there). The    man   Dino  Oresic   has   his    own   drums   school   here  in   Slowenia,  playing    african&indians rythms. Some   years    ago   here in   my    country we had   a    concert   of   Shankar,   too.
I   am    member   of  this    festival    here  in   Austria,    we  have new   drumms    group, this   are    my   big   friends,   here:
 
Art:
I   am proffesor   of   Art   history. My   first seminar work  19   years   ago   was old   Indian  traditional   art (architecture, sculpture,  paintings).  I wrote   about   this   theme   more   than 60   sites.
my   nearest  friend Anja   Zalta,  she   is   a   Doctor   of cultural  Anthropology and   proffesor   on the   University in   our   capital    City   Ljubljana,    has   been  in India   and   she finished her  study with   dyplome   about hynduistic temple  in Mathura.
 
Have   you    any   questions for    me?
 
I   am    saying   again:   i   like traditional   Indian   music   and    art.
 
regards,  Joze
 
PS:    sory,   my    english  is    bad,   i   am    better  in  German, chroatian,   serbian   and   slowene,   sure
 


Edited by Joze - 11 Dec 2009 at 18:05
Best regards!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 18:37
Originally posted by Joze Joze wrote:

Hy to   all!
Well  dear  Cahaya   from   SE Asia,  i  live  in   very  small   country Slowenia,  this  is  in   middle  Europe. I  know  25   years friends from my  nearest  "big"  town  Maribor  (ab. 200 000 people) and  they  make old  traditional instruments (ethno) from all ower  the    world. They   are realy  good! :) But some  others   have their own music teachers  IN  INDIA and  they   travel  to   the   India 3 - 4 times  in  Year  to   study   and   to   learn   the ragas  in   India (there). The    man   Dino  Oresic   has   his    own   drums   school   here  in   Slowenia,  playing    african&indians rythms. Some   years    ago   here in   my    country we had   a    concert   of   Shankar,   too.

I   am    member   of  this    festival    here  in   Austria,    we  have new   drumms    group, this   are    my   big   friends,   here:


 

Art:

I   am proffesor   of   Art   history. My   first seminar work  19   years   ago   was old   Indian  traditional   art (architecture, sculpture,  paintings).  I wrote   about   this   theme   more   than 60   sites.

my   nearest  friend Anja   Zalta,  she   is   a   Doctor   of cultural  Anthropology and   proffesor   on the   University in   our   capital    City   Ljubljana,    has   been  in India   and   she finished her  study with   dyplome   about hynduistic temple  in Mathura.

 

Have   you    any   questions for    me?

 

I   am    saying   again:   i   like traditional   Indian   music   and    art.

 

regards,  Joze

 

PS:    sory,   my    english  is    bad,   i   am    better  in  German, chroatian,   serbian   and   slowene,   sure

 


hi prof jose,

that is very interesting. Glad to see u here.
pls excuse my reply on ur first post. I was thinking that you will be a little bit younger and might be one of the bollywood movies fans (actually i am one of them.. )
i can't say much about Indian traditional music & art but Indian food is always my all time fav and the places in the country are awesome. I had been there twice, both Mumbai and Delhi.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote es_bih Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 22:02
Maribor, nice town. I've been in Ljubljana a few times.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2009 at 22:28
Originally posted by Mangel_Pandey Mangel_Pandey wrote:

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Originally posted by Mangel_Pandey Mangel_Pandey wrote:

Originally posted by whalebreath whalebreath wrote:

I like Indian food but they always cook with too much salt.
Theres no such a thing as "Indian food" as there is no such a thing as "Indian language" or "Indian race". The only "Indian" thing about all "Indians" is that we come from India.


You mean just like all Europeans come from Europe, all Germans from Germany, all Italians from Italy, all Fijians from Fiji, all Americans from America?



The natives of all these regions are easily identifiable based solely on their looks. Like for example a rosy white skinned Europid individual is most likely of European descent.
Why are you suddenly throwing in 'of...descent'? You didn't say 'all Indians are of Indian descent' you said 'Indians come from India'. You claim not to be racist, and now you're throwing in a racial categorisation (and shifting your ground).
Quote
Indians are not easily identifiable. There are at times where even I have presumed a Somalian for a Tamil, a Spaniard for a North West Indian and North East Indian for an East Asian.
You destroy your own argument, by pointing out that you thought a Spaniard was an Indian, after claiming Spaniards were easily identifiable as European. This kind of distinction by appearance is nonsensical. It would be pointless even if it were universally possible.
 
There are sound medical reasons for categorising patients according to genotype (sometimes reflected in the phenotype) but that's where any utility in doing so stops.
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Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

You're assuming a whole number of things (as is anyone who thinks all the propositions I just made are well-defined, let alone true), paramount among them the need for there to be a continuing well-defined meaning for the geographical entity (as 'Iberia' and 'Britain' have but 'Spain' and 'England' don't).


Yes but atleast all of traditional Europe is defined by the mostly White Europeans who inhabit it. That's not tne case of Indian.
Europe is defined as the peninsula west of the Urals. India is defined as the peninsula south of the Himalayas. Neither definition has anything whatsoever to do with the people who live there (or lived there in the past: could you 'easily' identify a Neanderthal as 'European'? )
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Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Confusing ethnic and racial classifications with geographical ones doesn't get you very far either. You can come from Brixton and be African, and a long time ago I had a teenage girlfriend who came from Southampton but was Goanese (and therefore 'Indian').


I thnk you are missing the point here. Yes in today's globalized world anyone can look like anything and be from anywhere. But... I specifically mean "traditional" looks of Indians before the last century(globalization). What a typical French, a typical Pekinger, a typical Sudanese looks like etc and in that vein the assumption of what a stereotypical "Indian" should like.
You'll have to go back a lot further than a century if you're lookiing for a 'typical' Frenchman. And then, before you find one, you'll find the whole concept of a 'Frenchman' had dissolved into thin air, and what we now call 'France' is not inhabited by 'French' people at all. Same goes for India and would for China as a whole though I'm not sure about Beijing on its own.
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The only "Indian" thing about the different foods of the different regions of India is the use of spice and curry. But so is spice cooked all over South Asia(including Iran, Afghanistan) and South East Asia.

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Actually that's not true, especially of the way rice is normally prepared. Look for instance at the difference between an Iranian polo and an Indian biryani.


Heh, lol see that's what I'm talking about. Rice is almost completely omitted in the cuisine of North West India where Roti(bread) is staple.
You'll have to be a little more precise about 'North West India'. To most people that sounds like the North-West Frontier, which is now in Pakistan. Moreover my point was that rice dishes are generally prepared differently in Iran from the way they are in India, not that all meals in India (or Iran) include rice.
 
Not all meals in Mexico include meat with chocolate sauce, but serving it that way is typically Mexican and different from the way chocolate is used elsewhere.
 
(Note to pinguin: if other Latin American countries do what Mexico does I'll take your word for it.)
Quote

In South India on the other hand they completely omit Roti and eat rice and rice based foods as an integral part of their diet.

Briyana itself was brought into India by possibly Parsis and is traditional food of Indian Muslims and not Hindus.
So? I didn't say it was Hindu. But an awful lot of Hindus cook and eat biryanis. And for that matter I'd bet if it was indeed brought in to India from Iran, it was originally cooked like a polo, and only later was the steaming stage dropped.
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

More generally though, of course spices are used all over Asia. They're all over everywhere. What matters is the way the spices are used. If you want something that adds up to being typically Indian you'd be better off discussing the use of cheese since Indian cooking, like Chinese, makes no use of coagulated-protein cheeses, but, unlike Chinese, uses fromages frais in the form of paneer.
Quote Try going to an authentic Tamil cuisine restaurant and an authentic Muslim Kashmiri cuisine restaurant, you'll see what I'm talking about.


Its likely also that paneer was spread to India by Persians and/or Muslims.
So what? Russian tvorog is much the same as paneer, but Russians also eat regular cheeses. (Or they wouldn't have invented chicken Kiev. Iranians also eat something like feta, not just paneer.
Quote

Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Of course they'd probably be different. Go to a local restaurant in Toulouse and another in Metz and they'll be immediately distinguishable. But they'd both be well within the gambit of what one recognises as French cuisine. In fact try asking for a boilermaker in Plymouth and another in Newcastle (assuming they haven't been blanded out of existence) and you'll get a different drink, but they'll both be English beers, and recognisably so.


North West Indian food is far closer to Iranian and Afghan food than it is to South Indian food. Like the basmati rice, naan/bread, paneer, kebab/stewed meat. Tea is called chai in both Indic and Farsi... and I don't even know anything about Persian cuisine to begin with. If I did I can make a far better comparison.
I don't think anyone much will object to seeing cultural affinity between the peoples of north India, Pakistan and India (and much of Afghanistan), since they are commonly caled Indo-Iranian.
 
What they call tea is irrelevant since the name 'chai' comes essentially from Chinese, and is commonly used in many languages including Russian and its associates.
Quote
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

The thing is, that with your Tamil and Muslim Kashmiri restaurants, the overwhelming majority of people would have no difficulty in recognisinig both of them as 'Indian'.


No. Put Tamil, Malay, Iranian and Kashmiri dishes together and I can bet no one who knows anything about each cuisine can tell exactly which is which.
Any cook from any of those regions could recognise his own. In fact any native of them. Or anyone used to them.


Edited by gcle2003 - 11 Dec 2009 at 22:55
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Harburs Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Dec 2009 at 04:33
  Apart from some ancient language similarity with north Indian I feel no affinity toward Indians. From culture, art, music, food, clothing, movies, religion, ritual, to tradition there no connection, Indians live in their own world which is totally different from Iranian hemisphere.Smile< id="gwProxy" ="">< ="jsCall;" id="jsProxy" ="">
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Joze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Dec 2009 at 23:44
Hy  to   all!
Cahaya -  no   problem,   you   are   welcome!
Yes,  i  like  ihis   forum, here   are   people  from   all  ower  the   world,   this   is   very   good! :)
 
I   also   don't   know   much    about   trad.   indian   music - i   just  like   it, since   my teeneager   years.   In   taht  times,  more  than   20  years   ago, it  was   difficult   to   get   some tapes  from   India,  but  some   people  was  traveling  there,  anyway. I   am    veregatrian   ab.   20   years   and i   studdy   also  the     yoga   ab.   20   years   ago,   too,   but   for   a    short   time.  But   my friend,  a   teaucher   of   history   at   my   school,  is   teacher   (with  licence)   of   asthanga   yoga   and   it  is  interesting: here   in   orur   school   the   old teachers  (womans) are practicising   yoga..... For   20   years   ago,  i   was   many   times   in   the  ISCON bhakti-yoga   temples,  too  (here  in  Eu),  it   was   very  good    and interesting.
I   learned  something   about  the   east style of   living,   that's   good.
But   now   i   like   our    culture,   our    west   tradition,  i like  the    Celts   and   in    am   reenactor  of  them (of  the   Celts). I   like   all   tradition  on  the    world! :)
The Boollywood   music is   interesting,   too -  it  give   my   this    yoga teacher working  at   our   school.  But   i   like    also   the   others yoga-chaints(songs),   too: like   Krishna   Dass.  It   is    very   peacefull   music,  the   tradit.   music   is more "groowy"   and "livefull."
Sory,   if    i   sad   i    am   a   professor,   but  this   is  the  thruth,    too.  I   usually    don't   use   my   "titule," the   most   importazt   is,   what     do you do (your   action)  in   your   live and   if  that   bring    you    happeness.
I   have  friends -  they   were   in   SE   Asia,  too (Syngapoore, Bali,  Vietnam,  Mianmar,   Kambodga,  Tailand ....) and   also the friends,  they   were  in   the   nord   part    of  India,  Kashmir, Ladakh,  in  Nepal,  Tibet,   etc ..... One   student   of   grammar   school, from the   small    town   Ruse,  9.   klass  (15   years)   was   in  Nepal,   in  Mustang -  he has   Web  kontakt   with   one Nepal-Boy   from   budhistic's school,   16    years   and  our   young   Slowene were  there   in    Mustang  to   visit   his   Web-Friend. This   is good!
Om    shanti  om,   om     bhagavan  om ..... :) Peace    to    all!!!
@  es_bih:   that's   very   good,  you   know   the  Ljubljana!  :)  I     have   never    been   in   USA. I   was    there   yesterday -   becouse it   has  now  in  this   christmas time  a   beautifull    lights (the universum    planets).  Hope    you   enyoed here  in   our   small    land.
 
Joze


Edited by Joze - 12 Dec 2009 at 23:45
Best regards!
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cahaya View Drop Down
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Joined: 05 Oct 2005
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote cahaya Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Dec 2009 at 00:27
Originally posted by Joze Joze wrote:


Om    shanti  om,   om     bhagavan  om


Om Shanti Om.. i only know it's a Farah Khan's movie. What does it mean?
Bhagavan... It's 'god' If I am not mistaken.

Perhaps.. Omar or Gharanai know (if they understand hindi or urdu)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Dec 2009 at 07:11
Om shanti om...is the mantra for "peace"
 

"Bhagavan Das never had anything better to do than call up MysticMama on the Mantric Telephone."                                                                               

Allen Ginsberg

The bus is now loading for the Golden Age...but I doubt most of us are ready for the Oneness University...despite our known love for avatars.Wink

But hey they're on myspace!


Edited by drgonzaga - 13 Dec 2009 at 07:15
Honi soit qui mal y pense
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Joze Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Dec 2009 at 18:10
Yes -  is   mantra  for  peace, we   all   need   peace,  i  know it  from   Krishna  Das    songs -  they   are   very   peaceful. Bhagavan  i  know from  one lesson   about Katholicism in  India - the  chatolic's "Vather"  (God) translation called  Bhagavan.  (vater,   son   and   the   holly   spirit= Om  Bhagavan, prabhu pitta  Bhagavan).
But  this posting  is only for  information -  i   am   atheist private. I  readed  ab.  20   years   ago   some  hindu books  and some words i   remember,  but for interesting  informaiton: here  in   Slowenia some   autors wrote articles  about analogies between our    slowene   language  and  the   indian   sanskrit. Our language  is very  old,   too (archaic). Example: agni  (fire) and slowene (modern): ogenj,  but   old people here are saying:  ojgn,   ojgi -  this  is very simillar  to   sanskrit agni. There   are   many   words like  this.
 
Regards,  Joze
Best regards!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Sir Mixalot Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Oct 2014 at 10:44
Holy Cow! Excuse the pun, I wonder what my DNA is? A mix of Australian aboriginal (Yandruwandha tribe), Irish, Scottish, English and French (Normandy 1690). I got fair to olive skin and proud of my black ancestry too!
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