| FORUM | ARCHIVE |                    | TOTAL QUIZ RESULT |


  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Problems with Spanish pronounciation?
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login


Welcome stranger, click here to read about some of the great benefits of registering for a free account with us and joining us in our global online community.


Problems with Spanish pronounciation?

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Problems with Spanish pronounciation?
    Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 05:21
Speaking a foreign language is not easy, that's the reason -I believe- why Spanish is popular for learning: it seems easier than other languages, for most non-native speakers.
 
But Spanish is not free of tricky things. Forgetting the madness of objects with sex, that "embarazado" is not the same tham "embarrasing", and stuff like that, there are some quite difficult things just ahead of the apparience.
 
I remember trying to teach some "gringo" friends how to pronounce the single "r" in Spanish. I insisted they pronounced it all day long in words like "Carter" (In American style), but it was impossible for them to repeat the sound.
 
Not long ago, while at a tranning class, the teacher that was Brazilian and that lived in my country for several years, had quite a problem to pronounce a word with "J". I don't remember the word, but let say it was "Jamas". Well he stuck at the world and repeated several times, but he couldn't pronounce it. We were amazed! But listened respectfully, anyways.
 
So, the question is for non-native speakers of Spanish. Have you ever encounter one of those tricky difficulties of Spanish?
 
In my case, the pronounciation of the words "World" and "Thousand" in English was a torture... I bet know at least I can try ConfusedConfusedLOL
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Edited by pinguin - 15 Jul 2009 at 05:23
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Knights View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar

Joined: 23 Oct 2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 4089
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 05:49
I guess for me, words which combined more than one "foreign" (not in english) sound were difficult to get my mouth around at first. Say, a word with a j and/or h and or ge/gi and/or ll. Example - el hijo, la hija, la hoja, to name a few. However, with practice I managed to get the hang of all the new sounds of spanish, and they really sound fantastic! Smile
Back to Top
Slayertplsko View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar
The Central Scrutinizer

Joined: 13 May 2008
Location: Slovak Republic
Status: Offline
Points: 1199
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Slayertplsko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 08:02

How does el hijo combine more than one foreign sound (if we don't consider the vowels, which are slightly different)? H is silent, isn't it?

Pinguin, why was the word thousand difficult for you?? Was it the [z] sound or the 'th' sound? Or something else?

Back to Top
Knights View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar

Joined: 23 Oct 2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 4089
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 08:39
Well in the case of that, Slayer, it is more the fact that el hijo contains two different pronunciation elements to english (rather than explicitly two different 'sounds') - the silent h and the interesting j sound. They were just examples, and yes I know that we also have some words with silent h, like honour.

Regardless, I was making the point that words like el hijo and la hija were difficult for me to grasp at first.
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 11:28
Being from Wessex I have trouble pronouncing an 'r' between two vowels properly in English, let alone Spanish. And 'perro' is completely beyond me. Otherwise 'b's and 'v's give me a problem in Spanish, but then apparently, according to Spanish friends of mine, they do to many Spaniards too.
 
PS. I've pretty well given up on 'mirror' in English, but at least I can say 'looking-glass'.


Edited by gcle2003 - 15 Jul 2009 at 11:30
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
Knights View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar

Joined: 23 Oct 2006
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 4089
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 11:35
Perro is a great sounding word, if you can get the 'rr' out of your mouth without choking. That's another thing, saying 'r' before and in-between vowels (as well as 'rr'), where a certain degree of trilling is required. I actually have a Spanish test tomorrow, funnily enough.
Back to Top
Zagros View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
Kaveh ye Ahangar

Joined: 11 Aug 2004
Location: MidX,Engelistan
Status: Offline
Points: 12491
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 11:57
"Pewwo"

It's just a simple vibration of the tongue at the bank behind the front teeth (at the roof of the mouth) - it isn't gutteral so there shouldn't be any danger of choking.  Aside from the virtue of my native tongue, I also have a Scottish accent, giving me no problems of pronunciation with Spanish words. 
Back to Top
hugoestr View Drop Down
King
King

Most Glorious Leader of Muzhnopia

Joined: 13 Aug 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 5213
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hugoestr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 12:08
The sound of the single r in Spanish is called a flap, and as Pinguin pointed out, it occurs in American English. I like using the word "butter" as an example where it happens between two vowel sounds.

The trill, that nice rr in perro, is tricky to make. I have only heard it in U.S. English when some perro exaggerate a British accent in the word, ehm, "British".

Now, the voiceless th sound as in "think" in English is a big problem, which shouldn't be because the sound exists in Spanish from Spain and most people, at least from Mexico, can make it when imitating Spaniards.

Also an interesting sound that occurs in Mexican Spanish is the 'st' combination at the beginning of the words as in estoy. A common feature is that the initial vowel is dropped, so it sounds like stoy. Even those Mexicans that don't speak like this can usually imitate those who do. Yet they will consistently say estar for "start" and esport for sport
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 12:16
Originally posted by hugoestr hugoestr wrote:

Also an interesting sound that occurs in Mexican Spanish is the 'st' combination at the beginning of the words as in estoy. A common feature is that the initial vowel is dropped, so it sounds like stoy. Even those Mexicans that don't speak like this can usually imitate those who do. Yet they will consistently say estar for "start" and esport for sport
Sounds a bit like what the Portuguese do, where 'Estoril' becomes ''shtoril'. At least they do in Portugal. At least they do around Lisbon.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
Kaysaar View Drop Down
Consul
Consul
Avatar

Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 370
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kaysaar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 12:36
I've got a very solid (mostly) Castillian Spanish accent, but I still trip over words that have a slight trill going into an inter dental sound (ladrar). I can still pronounce it, but if I'm tired or agitated, it doesn't sound very good.

On a side note, I had a Spanish professor who had been studying and speaking Spanish pronunciation for 30 years, but could not for the life of her pronounce the word 'meteorológico'

And Pinguin, I teach English pronunciation, and the most hated words I hear about from a Spanish phonological perspective are: year, and the differences between war, word, world. After those, we do work with V and B

EDIT - For whatever reason, the forum doesn't seem to like the accent in lógico... it reads correctly in the preview, but incorrectly in the actual post... weird.


Edited by Kaysaar - 15 Jul 2009 at 12:38
�Vamos Bar�a! �Vamos a por el triplete otra vez!
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 13:39
Originally posted by Slayertplsko Slayertplsko wrote:

...Pinguin, why was the word thousand difficult for you?? Was it the [z] sound or the 'th' sound? Or something else?
 
In South America we don't pronounce the "Z" in the Spanish style, but more like an "S". Besides, it took me a while to realize "Th" actually sounded like "Z". Confused  I bet Spaniards don't have trouble at all with the "Th".
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 01 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 13:53
The answer to the trilling "r" is a simple one and is directly related to the tongue, which is a muscle and adheres to the rule: use it or lose it! As strange as it might seem if the anterior of the tongue is never exercised to create the sound and establish flexibility, that ability disappears with age and by age 12 if you can not enunciate r con r cigarro, r con r barril, mira que rapido corren los carros del ferrocarril you never will. No Celt will ever suffer from this disability! 
 
Now as to regional differences within the context of Spanish itself chalk that up to both history and migratory patterns. The harsh Y of Buenos Aires and the propensity to "sing" vowels and dipthongs in rural Central Mexico is as simple to explain as the difference between the Spanish and Italian variation on pronouncing the double "ll".
 
Not that other languages do not exhibit similar phenomena. You all come, you hear me is enunciated as Yall kum yah here meh in many areas of the South and heaven knows how many distinct patterns are heard in England itself from one shire to another. During the Franco dictatorship, Madrid sought to introduce conformity in the peninsula beyond the banning of other languages such as Catalan, Galician, and Basque, and actually enforced the zeta of Castille in Andalusia and demanded the pronunciation of end consonants!
 
One has to understand that the patterns of one language will often disturb the acquisition of another after a certain age. For example a native speaker of Spanish will have headaches with the vowels of English because of the latter's variations (e.g. short a, long a, silent a) impossible in Spanish. Just a simple name such as mine, Diego, will become Deeaygo to an Anglo repeatedly or worse, Jago!
 
Unless one wishes to enter the world of GBS and play Professor Higgins to an endless parade of 'Liza Doolittles, one should just kick back and marvel at the endless varieties that make our world extremely interesting.


Edited by drgonzaga - 15 Jul 2009 at 13:54
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 15:49
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

No Celt will ever suffer from this disability! 
Hey, I'm half Celt. Wrong half, presumably Smile
 
I can say Llanelly though.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
Etnad View Drop Down
Knight
Knight
Avatar

Joined: 07 Jun 2009
Location: Denmark
Status: Offline
Points: 87
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Etnad Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 20:33

When I had spanish in highschool, I realy hated ñ...

Stupid.. :(
Back to Top
Mixcoatl View Drop Down
King
King


Joined: 02 Aug 2004
Location: Poyais
Status: Offline
Points: 5042
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mixcoatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 20:58
The r is no problem for me, the rr is a different matter alltogether. Even if I put specific attention to it I can't hear the difference between caro and carro.

Also I don't understand what's so difficult about pronouncing Paranguaricutirimícuaro
Back to Top
Emperor Barbarossa View Drop Down
Caliph
Caliph
Avatar
r�gh

Joined: 15 Jul 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 2898
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Emperor Barbarossa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 21:12
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

No Celt will ever suffer from this disability! 
Hey, I'm half Celt. Wrong half, presumably Smile
 
I can say Llanelly though.


Same here (3/8 Scottish, 1/8 Welsh), and I can pronounce some Gaelic words (never got into Welsh, though), but I cannot pronounce the rr. I have taken Spanish for four years in high school, gotten high A's all throughout, and even honorable mention at a high school Spanish competition (sorry, I feel sort of like a braggart). And yet, I have never gotten over the pronunciation of the rr. I just cannot roll my tongue. I do substitute with a wierd guttural sound in my throat to make a guttural sound similar to the rr (or that similar to my cat purring).

Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:


But Spanish is not free of tricky things. Forgetting the madness of objects with sex, that "embarazado" is not the same tham "embarrasing", and stuff like that, there are some quite difficult things just ahead of the apparience.


Funny, my Spanish teacher told a story where she was in Spain and another American (male) tourist used embarazado for embarrrased in a grocery store. The woman he said it to thought that he was pregnant and started yelling at him.LOL
Pittsburgh, City of Champions
Back to Top
Zagros View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
Kaveh ye Ahangar

Joined: 11 Aug 2004
Location: MidX,Engelistan
Status: Offline
Points: 12491
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 21:14
I'm 0/1 Celt - how can I do the rr then? Hmm, answer me that.


Edited by Zagros - 15 Jul 2009 at 21:15
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 01 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 21:23
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Originally posted by Slayertplsko Slayertplsko wrote:

...Pinguin, why was the word thousand difficult for you?? Was it the [z] sound or the 'th' sound? Or something else?
 
In South America we don't pronounce the "Z" in the Spanish style, but more like an "S". Besides, it took me a while to realize "Th" actually sounded like "Z". Confused  I bet Spaniards don't have trouble at all with the "Th".
 
Of course they do, they confuse it for the "ce"! Andalusian pronunciation and not the tha thaing of the Meseta is the language of the Americas. What has confused many is the original Gothic "Thiuth" which did disappear from early Medieval Spanish as an individual letter in the alphabet. Its need made irrelevant by the presence of the lisping c and the z. The world speaks Spanish but in Madrid they affect Castillian!Cool
 
Do you say namas or nada mas, Pinguino?
 
Or worse, can you understand the following:
 
La verda ye que seique l'asturianu del ocidente ye mas puru que'l restu y caltien delles menes y carauteristiques que les otres variedaes perdieran cuantaya pola influyencia del castellanu. Na zona central, amas, sacantes delles partes de les cuenques (que ya non toes) l'amestau ye lo mas asemeyau al asturianu que se siente.
 
Asturia, que guapa che


Edited by drgonzaga - 15 Jul 2009 at 21:24
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 01 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 21:34
Originally posted by Mixcoatl Mixcoatl wrote:

The r is no problem for me, the rr is a different matter alltogether. Even if I put specific attention to it I can't hear the difference between caro and carro.

Also I don't understand what's so difficult about pronouncing Paranguaricutirimícuaro
 
Hey, Mixcoatl, just give up placing the accents since, apparently, the forum can not handle it as I've discovered when I've used them and gotten those squiggles as a result in my posts.
 
Hmm... to specifics, do you have the same problem with careta and carreta?
 
vara, barra?
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
Mixcoatl View Drop Down
King
King


Joined: 02 Aug 2004
Location: Poyais
Status: Offline
Points: 5042
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mixcoatl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 21:44
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:


Hmm... to specifics, do you have the same problem with careta and carreta?

 

vara, barra?

Yep.

I wonder though, I have been taught that one of the reasons the z/s and y/ll distinctions have disappeared in Latin American Spanish is because from the 16th century onwards entire generation of indigenous peoples had to learn Spanish as a second language, which caused pronunciation difficulties to disappear. It has always baffled me how the r/rr distinction (which is definately harder than the z/s and y/ll ones) did not disappear.

Usually when Spanish speaking people (who do not speak any foreign languages themselves) are amazed that one would not be able to hear the difference between r and rr I usually have them pronounce two English or Dutch words that only differ in vowel length (fill and feel for example).

Or I tell the story that once happened with an Ecuadoran classmate. Shortly before class begon she called one of my classmates telling she would be late because of a bom (bomb), so we immediately checked on the internet what had happened, a terrorist attack or something, but we couldn't find anything. Then when she arrived an hour later and we asked what happened she said the reason she was late was because a boom (tree) had fallen on the railway track.

Edited by Mixcoatl - 15 Jul 2009 at 21:49
Back to Top
eaglecap View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar

Joined: 15 Feb 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 3428
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 21:50
I have always had a hard time with the "rr' sound in Spanish. I will soon be taking some courses in Spanish. I have taken classes before and was starting to pick it up but then I moved to Spokane where few people speak Spanish. Remember roll the R's LOL
Back to Top
Kaysaar View Drop Down
Consul
Consul
Avatar

Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 370
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kaysaar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 01:56
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

The answer to the trilling "r" is a simple one and is directly related to the tongue, which is a muscle and adheres to the rule: use it or lose it! As strange as it might seem if the anterior of the tongue is never exercised to create the sound and establish flexibility, that ability disappears with age and by age 12 if you can not enunciate r con r cigarro, r con r barril, mira que rapido corren los carros del ferrocarril you never will.


I wouldn't go so far as to say never. The problem is that most people who try to learn to trill their 'rr' after a certain age are trying to do it in the wrong part of their mouth. While I was studying in Spain I helped a few other students find their mistake, and begin to work towards improving. After a few months, they were doing much much better.

Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

La verda ye que seique l'asturianu del ocidente ye mas puru que'l restu y caltien delles menes y carauteristiques que les otres variedaes perdieran cuantaya pola influyencia del castellanu. Na zona central, amas, sacantes delles partes de les cuenques (que ya non toes) l'amestau ye lo mas asemeyau al asturianu que se siente.


I get most of that - there are a few words here and there that I can't quite place, but I can make out the general gist of the passage. I'm guessing that 'ye' is the same as 'es' no? Still lost with 'cuantaya' and 'cuenques'
�Vamos Bar�a! �Vamos a por el triplete otra vez!
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 02:16
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Do you say namas or nada mas, Pinguino?
 
Nope, we say nahamas, with a "long a" LOL
 
 
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Or worse, can you understand the following:
 
La verda ye que seique l'asturianu del ocidente ye mas puru que'l restu y caltien delles menes y carauteristiques que les otres variedaes perdieran cuantaya pola influyencia del castellanu. Na zona central, amas, sacantes delles partes de les cuenques (que ya non toes) l'amestau ye lo mas asemeyau al asturianu que se siente.
 
Asturia, que guapa che
 
I don't get the text at all Confused. In Chile we talk close to Andalucians, but even worst but in a different way.
 
A dialog as a sample,
 
-Hola'on como'stai?
 
-Mahoma (mas o menos). eetoy esperandunaumento, pero el jefe es mas apretao que moño'e vieja.
 
LOL
 
Back to Top
hugoestr View Drop Down
King
King

Most Glorious Leader of Muzhnopia

Joined: 13 Aug 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 5213
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote hugoestr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 15:24
Originally posted by Mixcoatl Mixcoatl wrote:

Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:


Hmm... to specifics, do you have the same problem with careta and carreta?

 

vara, barra?

Yep.

I wonder though, I have been taught that one of the reasons the z/s and y/ll distinctions have disappeared in Latin American Spanish is because from the 16th century onwards entire generation of indigenous peoples had to learn Spanish as a second language, which caused pronunciation difficulties to disappear. It has always baffled me how the r/rr distinction (which is definately harder than the z/s and y/ll ones) did not disappear.


What I read was that the people who immigrated to the Americas didn't use the /z/ sound.
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 15:29
Well, we actually can speak with "z" "y" and all those sounds. What happened is that Hispanic Americans found them forced and exagerated ways of pronounce these words, and we preffer a lighter style.
 
In a way, Spanish of Spain is to the Spanish of the Americas what British English is to the North America and Australia.
Back to Top
Emperor Barbarossa View Drop Down
Caliph
Caliph
Avatar
r�gh

Joined: 15 Jul 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 2898
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Emperor Barbarossa Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 16:42
drgonzaga, is "que'l" short for "que el?" I have never encountered this phrase. Is it a local dialect thing, or is it common in Spanish?
Pittsburgh, City of Champions
Back to Top
Kaysaar View Drop Down
Consul
Consul
Avatar

Joined: 27 Aug 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 370
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kaysaar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 16:48
Originally posted by Emperor Barbarossa Emperor Barbarossa wrote:

drgonzaga, is "que'l" short for "que el?" I have never encountered this phrase. Is it a local dialect thing, or is it common in Spanish?


Unless I'm gravely mistaken, it's not Spanish at all, but rather Austurian, which is one of the many regional languages of Spain (Austurianu, Gallego, Catalán, Euskera).
�Vamos Bar�a! �Vamos a por el triplete otra vez!
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 16:58
Indeed. It sounds very different from Castilian, although it is obviously a Romance language. Even Ladino is closer to Castilian (International Spanish). 
Back to Top
drgonzaga View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar
Plus Ultra

Joined: 01 Oct 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 6262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 22:14
Hey folks, that little exercise was--as some guessed--Western Asturianu and there exists an Eastern variant as well. Then there are the patterns of Valencia and the Baleares, among many. Now, it should come as no surprise that the Spanish of the Americas is found in Spain and it is that of Andalusia and the Canary Islands. A resident of Havana or Cartagena or for that matter a Yucateco would not have to change a single pronunciational nuance to sound like a native Sevillano. Not even the Pinguino. As with Portuguese, Andalusian speech patterns never had the "z" nor the lisping "c" for such was made with the "s". Likewise, the "silencing of the ending consonants [e.g. dormio for dormido, na(h)ma(h) for nada mas]. Thus, the parallel made on UK/American English is not exactly valid. Yes, there are regional differences in vocabulary (such as different names for comestibles), but even many of these entered into Andalusia from the Americas [the Quechua word papa for potatoes rather than the Castillianized patata] but the fact is that the major element of Spanish migration for most periods came from Southern Spain and the Canary Islands.

Edited by drgonzaga - 16 Jul 2009 at 22:17
Honi soit qui mal y pense
Back to Top
eaglecap View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar

Joined: 15 Feb 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 3428
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 22:36
for me Pronunciation is the hard part of learning a language and once again I will be making this attempt with Spanish since I live so close to (Mheheco) Mexico.

In a lame attempt to learn Greek I had a hard time with Pronunciation. One correction I had to face was the word Aegina which I kept saying A-gina but it is really eg-gina and that was difficult for me at first. I gave up on Greek since no one speaks it here and Spanish is much more useful here.

I thought learning Turkish is easier but reading it is hard when some of the words can be so long. It is spoken much slower than English, Greek or Spanish and no articles or Masculine feminine nouns like in Greek or Spanish and to a lesser degree English. Understanding native speakers of both Spanish and Greek is also hard because they speak like machine guns but I am sure English is also the same to a non-native speaker.

I plan to pick up the Rosetta stone set for Spanish- has anyone used this to learn another language and how effective is it? It is very spendy!!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.093 seconds.