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ROBIN HOOD: Some reflections

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RonPrice View Drop Down
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    Posted: 11 Dec 2014 at 04:04

ROBIN HOOD

and......The Way We Really Were

Part 1:

Last night I watched some, but not all, of the story of Robin Hood, the heroic outlaw found in English folklore.  According to legend he was also a highly skilled archer and swordsman. Traditionally depicted as being dressed in Lincoln green, he is often portrayed as "robbing from the rich and giving to the poor" alongside his band of "Merry Men".  Robin Hood became a popular folk figure in the medieval period, and continues to be widely represented in modern literature, films and television.

Robin Hood is a 2010 British-American epic adventure film based on the Robin Hood legend, directed by Ridley Scott and starring Russell Crowe and Cate Blanchett.1  It was released in over 50 countries in the second week of May 2010, just as I was beginning my retirement at the age of 65 on two old-age pensions.  This adventure film was the opening film at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival.

Part 2:

Readers with the interest can access all sorts of sources on the internet to find out a wealth of detail regarding this film. The historicity, that is, the existence and life-narrative of Robin Hood has been debated for centuries. Modern academic opinion maintains that the legend is based in part on a historical person, although there is considerable scholarly debate as to his actual identity.  A difficulty with any such historical research is compounded by the fact that "Robert" was, in medieval England, a very common given name, and "Robin", was its very common diminutive, especially in the 13th century.

I don't want to delve into the intricacies associated with either the film or the historical person. I leave that to readers who are also keen movie-goers, as I say, to excavate the accuracy and inaccuracy of the film, how much money it grossed, and some of the reviews now available.  -Ron Price with thanks to 1Channel 7 TV, 8:30, 9 December 2014.

Part 3:

I am interested here in exploring my study of the Middle Ages during my 70 year lifespan. I have written extensively on my website at this link: http://www.ronpriceepoch.com/HISTORY-medieval.html, and readers can access several dozen pages of my commentary on that period of history.  I could only find one prose-poem in my oeuvre that even mentions the Middle Ages and I quote it below:

 ----------------------------------------------------------

Part 3.1:

CIRCUMNAVIGATION

Four hundred years(1519 to 1919) after Ferdinand Magellan and 237 men left Seville1 and began the first successful attempt of humankind to circumnavigate the globe, ‘Abdu’l-Baha’s Tablets of the Divine Plan were unveiled in New York.  The early 16th century is generally seen as the end of the middle ages and the beginning of the early modern period.

Those Tablets are generally seen by the Bahá'í community as beginning a new pioneering period.  They initiated another attempt to circumnavigate the world but, this time, in spiritual terms.  An English edition of all those  tablets was published in 1936 just as the North American Baha’is were planning their first formal teaching program, the Seven Year Plan, which began in May 1937.  The year I joined the Baha’i Faith, in 1959, those Tablets were published in book form under the title Tablets of the Divine Plan for the first time.2-Ron Price with thanks to 1&2 Wikipedia.

Part 3.2:

Only 18 men returned to Spain

in that harrowing voyage and

this new voyage was also just

as harrowing and is not for the

timid and the overwrought, not

for the vainly pious, those who

are pusillanimous of spirit, nor

the bloodless prigs among us...

 

This much is plain: the journey

is not for those wary & in despair

of love------this trip on unvariable

storm-lashed brigs....unreasonable

rains, long waits for salient doves

to bring living twigs....with a lean

provision of devotion, with weeks

& months of never-ending dark.

 

This is no vacation with unhygienic

perils such as chronic & committed

rapture or incipient dedication; forget

your notions of some luxury cruise.1

 

It was that way for Magellan, and

circumnavigation still has problems

in this new globalizing-planetization

age we all live in this its new terrors.

1 With thanks to Roger White, “A Parable for the Wrong People,” The Witness of Pebbles, George Ronald, Oxford, 1981, pp.69-71.

Ron Price

19/7/ '09 to 10/12/'14.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Part 4:

Until my first two years at university, 1963 to 1965,  in Ontario I took no courses in, did no study of,  the period known as the Middle Ages.  I took one course in the first year of an arts degree, and one in my second year, while studying history and philosophy, courses that covered some part of that period in history.  In my years of being a teacher and tutor, a lecturer and adult educator, from 1967 to 2005, I often read about what I always found to be a complex period in history.  But, then, I have found that the more I know about a period in history, the more complex it gets.

Historical period drama is a film genre in which stories are based upon historical events and famous people. Some historical dramas are docudramas which attempt an accurate portrayal of a historical event or biography.  Of course, it is only accurate to the degree that the available historical research will allow. Other historical dramas are fictionalized tales that are based on an actual person and their deeds, such as Braveheart, which is loosely based on the 13th-century knight William Wallace's fight for Scotland's independence.

There are now dozens of films and docudramas beginning, arguably, in 1937 with Scipio Africanus: The Defeat of Hannibal. Those involving the Middle Ages include: Alexander Nevsky in 1938; Theodora, Slave Empress in 1954, The Raid of the Aegean in 1946, The Life and Death of King John in 1951, and several others.  For more on this genre go to Wikipedia.

Part 5:

I remember well being thrown

information by the truckload

as I went through those first

two years of university back

in those calamitous years of

the 1960s..I remember, too,

those little stories of Robin

Hood on our TV before my

parents sold it to save me

from being inundated by

trivia as the world tried to

forget the terrors of those

war years, the holocaust,

the A-bomb, & at the same

time drown us all in simple,

superficial proprieties, far

removed from genitalia.1

 

Then rock-'n' roll woke us

up from our day-dream of

Mr Clean, luxury without

stress, Negroes, Indians &

all those Hollywood's icons.

 

Those docudramas in cinema

would have helped my teaching

of history; beginning about the

time my parents met in the late

1930s, and at the same time as

the Baha'i community launched

its 1st systematic teaching Plans,

they help to bring history alive to

the millions who find it a very dry

graveyard of distant information!!

1 D.T. Miller and M. Nowak, The Fifties: The Way We Really Were, Doubleday & Co. Ltd., N.Y., 1977, p. 302.

Ron Price

10/12/'14.

married for 47 years, a teacher for 32, a student for 18, a writer and editor for 15 and a Baha'i for 55(in 2014)
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caldrail View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote caldrail Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Jan 2015 at 11:42
The real Robin Hood was more than likely a right peasant villain. Will Scarlet, one of his colleagues in the romances, is a name derived from 'lockpicker'.

The idea of Robin Hood as a disinherited noble is an invention of the Victorian Age.
http://www.unrv.com/forum/blog/31-caldrails-blog/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RonPrice Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Jan 2015 at 00:18
Thanks, Caldrail, for your contribution.  Whatever the source, robin Hood has certainly caught the imagination of popular culture. Since Robin Hood is a character in the public domain, there is no restriction on his use. Thus, he has often appeared in series that do not necessarily revolve around the legend, particularly in cartoons or a science fiction and fantasy setting. The following are some of the notable adaptations of the Robin Hood story in film and television....at this link: 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_films_and_television_series_featuring_Robin_Hood


Edited by RonPrice - 05 Jan 2015 at 00:19
married for 47 years, a teacher for 32, a student for 18, a writer and editor for 15 and a Baha'i for 55(in 2014)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Jan 2015 at 01:54
Originally posted by caldrail caldrail wrote:

The real Robin Hood was more than likely a right peasant villain. Will Scarlet, one of his colleagues in the romances, is a name derived from 'lockpicker'.

The idea of Robin Hood as a disinherited noble is an invention of the Victorian Age.



I agree with you. Throughout history, there many examples of outright criminals being portrayed as heroes of the oppressed peasantry.

The uneducated peasantry had only one way to pass on stories, and that was by the telling-over years, this bit was added and that bit was added to spice the story up a bit, and so it passed into time as "fact".


"Tá mé bródúil as mo oidhreacht na hÉireann".
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Jan 2015 at 06:29
Originally posted by RonPrice RonPrice wrote:

something about ROBIN HOOD



Ron:

How about writing some of your own "reflections" as opposed to merely copying a passage of text from someone elses work?

By writing comments of your own you create the opportunity for others to debate or discuss your views, leading to a far more interesting thread.

Being an ex-teacher, I would have expected that you would know that a "forum" is a venue for discussion and debate, not re-publishing another persons work.



Edited by Northman - 07 Jan 2015 at 00:03
"Tá mé bródúil as mo oidhreacht na hÉireann".
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