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Topic ClosedTerrorism/Low Intensity Conflict

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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Terrorism/Low Intensity Conflict
    Posted: 18 Nov 2017 at 12:54
Not all of conflicts are wars or battles.  Low Intensity conflict refers to low level conflict such as guerrilla actions or terrorist actions.  It probably could be extended to cyberwarfare, and economic actions such as embargoes.

For example, when the Baader Meinhof gang, a split off from the Red Army Faction, assassinated a German banker through a satchel charge tied up to a bicycle along the banker's security route (in an armored car), they knew his route, his schedule, named the exact time when he was to die (German punctuality.)  At that point, security force knew they were in trouble and could no longer be predictable.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2017 at 13:53
Originally posted by franciscosan franciscosan wrote:

Not all of conflicts are wars or battles.  Low Intensity conflict refers to low level conflict such as guerrilla actions or terrorist actions.  It probably could be extended to cyberwarfare, and economic actions such as embargoes.

For example, when the Baader Meinhof gang, a split off from the Red Army Faction, assassinated a German banker through a satchel charge tied up to a bicycle along the banker's security route (in an armored car), they knew his route, his schedule, named the exact time when he was to die (German punctuality.)  At that point, security force knew they were in trouble and could no longer be predictable.

Perhaps the most insidious warfare being conducted at present is the invisible Cyber War. The glaring examples are the allegations of Russian interference in the Presidential elections.

Cyber War can be directed at national finances, politics, health, education, whatever. It can be directed from almost any place on earth, to any place on earth, and is heavily reliant on one state's internet specialists being better than the opposition in creating spyware/antispyware etc.

While we all know about terrorist bombings and other attacks, the influence on our countries and culture of Cyber War is immeasurable.

The US Army has in place Cyber Command and, in Europe, it works out of Germany. We don't know just how effective this has been in stopping or diverting cyber attacks, because of national security implications.

“The biggest surprise in a man’s life is old age.”
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2017 at 10:49
I am sure that if we were in the industry of cyber-security, we would have some idea of what goes on, but yes, we don't really have a need to know, at least not in the big picture.  
I think most hacking is criminal, or malicious mischief.  Of course, that does not mean that a government is not behind it, manipulating things.  But, I don't think that we have seen anything yet like a concerted attack on infrastructure, power grid for example.  I could be wrong, but I think that anything overt would be quickly responded to.

As far as cyber-attacks are concerned, North Korea can attack the U.S. but not visa versa.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2017 at 16:21
Originally posted by franciscosan franciscosan wrote:

I am sure that if we were in the industry of cyber-security, we would have some idea of what goes on, but yes, we don't really have a need to know, at least not in the big picture.  
I think most hacking is criminal, or malicious mischief.  Of course, that does not mean that a government is not behind it, manipulating things.  But, I don't think that we have seen anything yet like a concerted attack on infrastructure, power grid for example.  I could be wrong, but I think that anything overt would be quickly responded to.

As far as cyber-attacks are concerned, North Korea can attack the U.S. but not visa versa.

Sun Tzu said,"Know your enemy."

And while no overt cyber attacks have been made, as far as we know, the information gained by those who oppose us may be of more value.


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Nov 2017 at 08:23
I don't know what, say, the US offensive capability is for Cyber attacks, but I am sure it is there.  The United States is a rather open society, and so other powers take advantage of that.  That could be Russia, China or North Korea, but it also could be France who uses its intelligence services for industrial espionage as well.  Every once in awhile Israel gets caught spying on the US, which you would think wouldn't happen since we are close allies, but the fact is, what the US does is a very strong concern for Israel.  With Snowden releases, it was embarrassing that Angela Merkel of Germany had her phone tapped by the NSA, but I cannot say I am surprised.  One spies on one's enemies, but also to a certain extent, one spies on one friends as well.
It is the Panopticon, everybody spying on everybody else, (and being spied upon).


Edited by toyomotor - 20 Nov 2017 at 09:03
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Nov 2017 at 21:25
Originally posted by franciscosan franciscosan wrote:

I don't know what, say, the US offensive capability is for Cyber attacks, but I am sure it is there.  The United States is a rather open society, and so other powers take advantage of that.  That could be Russia, China or North Korea, but it also could be France who uses its intelligence services for industrial espionage as well.  Every once in awhile Israel gets caught spying on the US, which you would think wouldn't happen since we are close allies, but the fact is, what the US does is a very strong concern for Israel.  With Snowden releases, it was embarrassing that Angela Merkel of Germany had her phone tapped by the NSA, but I cannot say I am surprised.  One spies on one's enemies, but also to a certain extent, one spies on one friends as well.
It is the Panopticon, everybody spying on everybody else, (and being spied upon).

1. I don't know that the US Society is as open as you suggest. Your intelligence agencies have been caught out conducting unlawful operations so often, that in some cases, they beggar belief.

2. The French wouldn't be alone in Industrial Espionage. The USA, France, Israel and Russia all figure up pretty high on the list. The UK we're not so sure of, but in recent years countries such as Bulgaria have crept into the scene-on behalf of Russia perhaps.

3. Any national leader who, in this day and age, expects not to be spied upon, is niaive.


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Nov 2017 at 10:31
Unlawful operations where?  Overseas or Domestic?  Who's laws?

Do you have an example from the USA of Industrial espionage?  You forgot China.  They seem to have a rather lax view of cultural property.

It depends on what you mean by "spied" upon.  I imagine that some paranoid presidents (Nixon for example), would consider what the press does as spying upon him.  I am sure that part of what the secret service does, is done to foil electronic espionage.  Dick Cheney's pacemaker online feature was disabled so it couldn't be hacked.  Angela Merkle had a reasonable belief that her cell phone traffic was not being tapped into, on the other hand, if it was, there were really only a limited number of actors that could do it, and profit from it.  The cost of getting caught might not outweigh the data from doing so.  But then again, it might.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Nov 2017 at 13:43
Originally posted by franciscosan franciscosan wrote:

Unlawful operations where?  Overseas or Domestic?  Who's laws?

Do you have an example from the USA of Industrial espionage?  You forgot China.  They seem to have a rather lax view of cultural property.

It depends on what you mean by "spied" upon.  I imagine that some paranoid presidents (Nixon for example), would consider what the press does as spying upon him.  I am sure that part of what the secret service does, is done to foil electronic espionage.  Dick Cheney's pacemaker online feature was disabled so it couldn't be hacked.  Angela Merkle had a reasonable belief that her cell phone traffic was not being tapped into, on the other hand, if it was, there were really only a limited number of actors that could do it, and profit from it.  The cost of getting caught might not outweigh the data from doing so.  But then again, it might.

1. The FARC intervention;
2. Iran-Contra;
3. Viet Name heroin smuggling;

Need I go on?

Oh, you said "Industrial Espionage". Not that I can readily think of, but then again, who knows what these alphabet guys are up to?

Spied upon? As in "Spied Upon".
Quote 1. To watch or observe secretly: was sent to spy out the enemy camp.
2. To discover by close observation: "[They] are continually prowling about on all three decks, eager to spy outiniquities" (Herman Melville).
3. To catch sight of; see: spied the ship on the horizon.
v.intr.
1. To engage in espionage.
2. To investigate or observe something, especially in secret: spying into the neighbor's activities.




Edited by toyomotor - 26 Nov 2017 at 13:56
“The biggest surprise in a man’s life is old age.”
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