| FORUM | ARCHIVE |                    | TOTAL QUIZ RESULT |


  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - The classics of international relations
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login


Welcome stranger, click here to read about some of the great benefits of registering for a free account with us and joining us in our global online community.


The classics of international relations

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Kevin View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 27 Apr 2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 970
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Kevin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The classics of international relations
    Posted: 27 Nov 2010 at 04:02
It has been a long while since I'm posted on AE, so I'd though I'd drop by!Smile So as my first post since being back I thought I would ask what are considered the classics of international relations both in general and in theory?

In terms of the classics written in ancient and early modern times that are considered to be essential to international relations would be Plato, Thucydides, Sun Tzu, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Clausewitz among others. While modern classics within the field of international relations would be Weber, Marx, Kennan, Fukayuma, and Huntington.

Any another important contributions posters want to contribute? Or did I just nail all of the key classic writers on the head here?









Edited by Kevin - 27 Nov 2010 at 04:56
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13262
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Nov 2010 at 11:51

Offhand, Marsiglio of Padua comes to mind, especially assuming Church/Empire relations count as international. How about Henry Kissinger?

Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
pikeshot1600 View Drop Down
King
King


Joined: 22 Jan 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 5076
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pikeshot1600 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Dec 2010 at 22:43
If anyone is still looking in on this thread, I agree - Machiavelli, but not so much international, as power politics among adversaries.  As to the beginning theories of relations between nations, Hugo Grotius and Samuel von Pufendorf.

Don't forget the geographers-strategic thinkers, Halford Mackinder and Nicholas Spykman.  The entire 20th century was dominated by their theories, Mackinder in the first half and Spykman in the second.

I would leave out Karl Haushofer as I don't think he ever really understood geostrategy as  reflected in international relations.

 
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Dec 2010 at 01:19
Thucydides, seems to be the classic. Sun Tzu is a master in the art of war rather than in the skills of peace. Plato is too much theorical and one-sided, to the point Lucian of Samosata made fun of him LOL


Edited by pinguin - 10 Dec 2010 at 01:20
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.078 seconds.