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The Inheritance of Stalin

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caldrail View Drop Down
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    Posted: 17 Apr 2018 at 11:26
The latest round of political arguments between Russia and the west have revolved around the poisoning of the Skripal's in Salisbury, England, and the complex hostilities in Syria where Russia is keen to maintain the regime of its client ruler Assad. The west has responded with sanctions and air strikes. The Russians with a fusillade of counter accusations, cyber hacking, and vetoes in the UN.
 
I don't intend to argue the rights and wrongs of these events in this post but I do note how frequently western politicians have openly said in interview that Russia is being dishonest. Actually, it is hard to accept the official Russian view at face value, and the results of this contest are such that Sergey Lavrov, Russia's foreign minister, has said in a BBC interview that east-west relations are currently worse than in the Cold War. Is that for real? I agree we're not seeing eye to eye, but no-one is making threats of mutually assured destruction as I lived through during the Cold War era. I note how some are parading placards in public spaces fearful of a world war three, yet to me the situation seems far from the full on confrontations I used to see on the news.
 
Personally, I cannot accept the official Russian stand. Is that because I'm western and inherently suspect the Russian statements of political manoevering? Probably. The issue however is that Russia behaves as it does because it always has since the 1917 revolution and the ensuing policies of Stalin who formed the standards by which the former Soviet Union engaged with the west, along with strategies of communist expansion interrupted first by the Third Reich and afterward by NATO.
 
Make no mistake - Putin is an old fashioned dictator controlling a country that has recently accepted democracy yet seems unable to make democracy the ideal by which their politics are measured. he has a record of attempted or successful expansion into former soviet republics or satellite regions - Chechnya, Ossetia, Crimea,, eastern Ukraine. Having been voted into a fourth term by a majority vote (and not the landslide he was working for I note), it stands to reason he is seeking out his next 'conquest' to please the Russian public. That's what dictators do.
 
My guess is that he wants the Baltic States. There are Russian speaking peoples there and Putin has made no secret of his intent to unite Russian speaking peoples - an ambition that will ring alarm bells for anyone with any understanding of the politics of the last century. But he can't - these nations, despite being former Warsaw Pact states and indeed former conquests of Stalin's 1940's expansion, are NATO countries now. If Putin wants to invade, he can only do so by causing dissension within the ranks of NATO and intimidating them from reacting - and there are NATO forces in Poland and the Baltic States as we speak.. Hence we have the current behaviour of Russia, issuing propaganda and making counter acusations in the hope that the west will become divided enough to hamstring any concerted resistance to what I expect will be a major stunt - and gamble - by Putin in the near future as he sends in forces to 'free' the Russian speaking peoples of Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia.
 
Yet this kind of imperialism was always the post 1917 mission of Russia under the banner of communist export. The very same politics of Stalin infects modern Russia and sets it upon the course it has taken. All it needed was a leader with enough ambition to follow the path - in this case, the former KGB man Putin.


Edited by caldrail - 17 Apr 2018 at 11:27
http://www.unrv.com/forum/blog/31-caldrails-blog/
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Vanuatu View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Apr 2018 at 03:12
According to Pew polls 53% of Russians have confidence in Trump, 23% of US has confidence in Putin. Most countries see him as less of a threat than ISIS or global warming but information and lack of it account for something Vietnam Lebanon and Greece think he's a pretty good guy.

I don't say he's good but destabilizing the world would not benefit him or Russia. Maybe a slow encroachment under the right circumstances (another Obama)would be effective. 

Do you not think it a certainty that MI6 and CIA have also always been developing better ways to kill people, to consolidate power? Won't any means necessary be used when warranted by any nation(except Denmark)?



Edited by Vanuatu - 18 Apr 2018 at 03:15
The root of all desires is the one desire: to come home, to be at peace. -Jean Klein
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Apr 2018 at 10:09
Quote From the Bible, Galatians VI (King James Version): 
Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap.

And the ordinary people in Russia have been left to reap what was sown by Lenin, Stalin et al.

Over many years they have inherited a corrupt state, which shows no real indication of changing, hunger, low wages, poor housing and the list goes on and on.

One major difference between Stalin and Putin is that Stalin made no effort to conceal what he was doing to his country.
It's not that I was born in Ireland,
It's the Ireland that was born in me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote caldrail Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Apr 2018 at 12:41

An interesting point, but mine was that since Stalin's death the Russian government has remained intact unlike many powerful dictators thus the methodology of the past still guides how Russian government behaves today. Whilst the Russian Federation has adopted an outwardly democratic government, the reality is that Putin is able to manipulate it. He also happens to be an able showman despite his penchant for bare chested photo sessions.

http://www.unrv.com/forum/blog/31-caldrails-blog/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Vanuatu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Apr 2018 at 05:05
Putin is able to manipulate the government by encouraging backstabbing. The US expected the recent expulsions and tariffs to turn the oligarchs against Putin but actual journalists in Russia are reporting on the excesses and corruption of various sects within the government. So at least one oligarch is in jail and there is only more infighting and jockeying for position.

Video evidence of Oleg Deripaska with the Russian version of Stormy Daniels, annoyed Putin. 
Putin is draining the swamp lol.
When Putin says it's impossible that Russia could be involved with anything so terrible as the poisonings in UK he knows that we know that he's lying. Stalin would have said they deserved to die but maybe not because he is different from Putin, they both found optimal ways to control the empire. 
Putin condemns Stalin's "Holodomor":

 
But Russians, too, seem to increasingly view their long-time leader as something much more than a standard politician, though the image some are reaching for is not that of a czar. The word that keeps cropping up is vozhd, an ancient term imbued with mythic connotations that signifies a chieftain who stands above history, one who embodies the enduring will of the entire nation.

“Before, he was simply our president, and it was possible to change him,” tweetedMargarita Simonyan, head of the English-language RT television network, following the election. “Now he is our vozhd. And we will not let that be changed.”

similar thought was earlier voiced by the Kremlin’s then-deputy chief of staff, Vyacheslav Volodin, as the current East-West crisis was heating up. “Today there is no Russia if there is no Putin,” he told an assembly of Western scholars and journalists in late 2014. “Any attack on Putin is an attack on Russia.” There is even a current popular song by the rock group Rabfak entitled “Putin is Our Vozhd.”

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Europe/2018/0402/With-Russians-feeling-besieged-some-give-Putin-a-loaded-title-vozhd

The root of all desires is the one desire: to come home, to be at peace. -Jean Klein
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