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The Niger Delta oil situation - what to do?

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Knights View Drop Down
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    Posted: 25 Aug 2009 at 05:21
It was in the 1950s that Shell-BP were first granted oil exploration permits for the Niger Delta region of Nigeria, at that time under British control. These found the region to be oil rich, and only a few years later Nigeria gained independence (1960) and thus full control over the delta and its resources. The 15 or so years following independence was tumultuous for Nigeria, with successive corrupt and mismanaged regimes rising and falling, each trying its hand at a modernisation programme heavily dependent upon oil revenues. Oil-related corruption was rife, and growing hostility and contempt grew between the oil giants, the Nigerian governments, and the people of the delta region.

Despite a more solid government nowadays, and for the past couple of decades in fact, Nigeria has continued to experience the negative outcomes of oil exploitation. Social fragmentation and armed violence are two very visible and interrelated effects, which continue today. Paramilitary groups and militia gangs have been established throughout the Niger Delta region, intent on destabilising the oil production. This involves tapping oil pipelines (to either steal or dump oil), sieging oil rigs, hijacking transport boats and selling off stolen oil. The primary group involved is MEND, who have been fighting for several decades to ensure the people of the Delta region receive fair portions of the revenues - this is fair enough, in that the citizens of Port Harcourt (the major city of the Delta) and surrounding villages are living in generally poor conditions, amid a poor economic situation, decrepid facilities and resource extortion.

More recently, the attacks have been stepped up, as the demands of the militia groups are ignored by the oil companies and government. However, some agreements (very lately, in fact) have been forged, specificying the intent of oil majors to re-inject revenue into local communities. This has been accompanied by certain militia groups agreeing not to continue their attacks.

Nevertheless, very little action has occurred as of yet, and the violence and extortion continue. Considering the historical conditions, and present condition, is there any way of rectifying the situation, that will appease both parties? How could such a harmonious policy be reached, to in turn rectify the social and economic poverty within the Niger Delta region?

Greatly await seeing what everyone has to say.

Sincerely,

- Knights -

EDIT: I understand this is classified as a current affair, but current affairs get enough attention as is, so I'm keeping it here in the Modern Africa forum.


Edited by Knights - 25 Aug 2009 at 05:29
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Carcharodon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Aug 2009 at 10:28
Maybe it could help if we here in the west put some pressure on those oil companies that has their origin here at our places. We could petiton them and we could boycott products from companies who do not take their social, environmental or political responsibility. We could also petition our local politicians and ask them to put pressure on oil companies in our own countries that are involved in oil grab in Nigeria.
 
We could also try to encourage our politicians to take up this matters with Nigeria directly or through international institutions like the UN. Some countries are involved with developmental work in Nigeria. Such developmental work could maybe be questioned or renegotiated if the government of Nigeria do not come to grips with the oil situation.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Aug 2009 at 14:05
Iboland, chapter 2? Before the standard cant over Big and Evil Oil and all the other bug-a-boos employed to motivate Leftist defecation, the long story of "Biafra" or for that matter any corner of the Nigerian regional landscape requires treatment on its own terms and not as the "specimen" for the petrie dish of advocacy.
 
Gee, I like the term "re-inject revenues"...but seriously how does such result in social and economic justice since you can bet your booties that the local thugs will ensure their dose is the heftiest and all will remain the same...it will just be that the fat cats will live closer to the downtrodden.
 
 
By the way, I represent an interested Nigerian investor who wishes to protect his revenue flow by entering into partnerships with international historians. Simply open a bank account in your name with a minimum balance of $10,000, provide me the details and I will begin transferring substantial sums thereto....


Edited by drgonzaga - 25 Aug 2009 at 14:08
Honi soit qui mal y pense
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AksumVanguard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Aug 2009 at 00:26
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Maybe it could help if we here in the west put some pressure on those oil companies that has their origin here at our places. We could petiton them and we could boycott products from companies who do not take their social, environmental or political responsibility. We could also petition our local politicians and ask them to put pressure on oil companies in our own countries that are involved in oil grab in Nigeria.



Well there already has been something similar that was done in the 1990s were some Nigerians used the method of"divestment". This method involved that Anti-Multinational advocates spoke out to the world about investors investing in the British Shell company subsidary in Nigeria,and also suggested private investors recall their investments. Even back in 1993 some 300,000 Nigerians protested in the streets against the big rich conglomerate "Shell Oil Company" and forced it to halt its operations in Nigeria. 

There was one leader of protesters to of multinational oil companies  named "Ken Saro Wiwa" who had been hanged 5 times just because he was the leader of a protesting movement.


The rebels sabotaging these oil lines live in one district called the Warri. There is a particular group called the Istekeri who number in the 300,000 who constantly make raids on these sites,sabotage the pipelines,and some times even hi-jacks the barrels of oil. They are overshadowed by their more numerous rivals Urhobo and Ijaw who both number in the 1O millions.The FNDIC is a militant group of the Ijaw who demanded the Nigerian government to give up at least 13% share of revenue in,the Shell Petroleum Development Company.The government denied this,so the FNDIC attacked the bases near sea installation bases.As some oil companies move offshore for saftey reasons. So sometimes these rebel just want to get a cut in on the action.

One other scheme of choice  is for groups like FNDIC use  illegally bunkered oil. In which some of these Oil sites allow the Oil Pipelines to be tapped in which the rival groups are able to extract a small percentage of the oil.

My friend lives whose uncle is the Chieftain of a major tribe from Nigeria , says rebels  constantly rob some of the transport vehicles who delivered money to these banks also. Since the banks are spread out it makes it hard to deposit the money constantly,with inadequate wire transfers on the jobs.

Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:


Iboland, chapter 2? Before the standard cant over Big and Evil Oil and all the other bug-a-boos employed to motivate Leftist defecation, the long story of "Biafra" or for that matter any corner of the Nigerian regional landscape requires treatment on its own terms and not as the "specimen" for the petrie dish of advocacy.


Nobody mentioned anything of left wingist solutions in this matter. I don't think you would have any suggestions on how to deviate the damage being done to Nigeria. You wouldn't know the inner workings,or the political climate that is happening as of right now do you?

Being Pro Neo-Con sure has its hazards. Wink
Wink
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:


Gee, I like the term "re-inject revenues"...but seriously how does such result in social and economic justice since you can bet your booties that the local thugs will ensure their dose is the heftiest and all will remain the same...it will just be that the fat cats will live closer to the downtrodden.


Shows how much you know. The revenues don't have to be reinjected by or for the rebel groups or even their Sponsored Political Parties that endorsed rebel groups. Why not inject it  into the educational programs and health care relief. You make your insolent assumptions that bear no relevance to the subject. Who says give the money back to the rebels?Embarrassed

Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:


By the way, I represent an interested Nigerian investor who wishes to protect his revenue flow by entering into partnerships with international historians. Simply open a bank account in your name with a minimum balance of $10,000, provide me the details and I will begin transferring substantial sums thereto....

Nothing but a laundry boy aren't you. I bet your just as much as hypocrite to deal with these "local thugs" hmm.  nOW I bet you would rather wash Nigerian currency instead of investing in  Zimbabwe  deflated dollars wouldn't you.






Edited by AksumVanguard - 29 Aug 2009 at 11:40
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Oct 2009 at 17:58
Oops, I forgot to respond to the personal insults in the above post...but, hey, silence when faced by such inanities is always the best recourse.
Honi soit qui mal y pense
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AksumVanguard Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 Nov 2009 at 06:47
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Oops, I forgot to respond to the personal insults in the above post...but, hey, silence when faced by such inanities is always the best recourse.


Since this website a place were gentleman converse, I will make an attempt to refrain from such uncordial behavior. Your doctorates degree shall not be tarnished by my insults ,so lets drop it. For the sake of this website lets refrain from disorderly conduct,as some threads have been closed for this clashing ,as I think I can recall.

Happy Posting!Wink
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