| FORUM | ARCHIVE |                    | TOTAL QUIZ RESULT |


  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - The strongest warriors in the ancient history
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login


Welcome stranger, click here to read about some of the great benefits of registering for a free account with us and joining us in our global online community.


The strongest warriors in the ancient history

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Poll Question: What do you think is the strongest warrior in the ancient history?
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
3 [30.00%]
0 [0.00%]
1 [10.00%]
0 [0.00%]
0 [0.00%]
2 [20.00%]
1 [10.00%]
1 [10.00%]
2 [20.00%]
0 [0.00%]
0 [0.00%]
You can not vote in this poll

Author
 Rating: Topic Rating: 1 Votes, Average 5.00  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The strongest warriors in the ancient history
    Posted: 03 Oct 2012 at 22:29
OK

Edited by ancient historia - 03 Oct 2012 at 22:46
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Paradigm of Humanity View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 18 Oct 2011
Location: Konstantiniyye
Status: Offline
Points: 919
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Oct 2012 at 22:57
I don't know if there is that much difference between Huns and Scythians. AFAIK both relied on light cavalry archers armed with composite bows and maces and employed hit and run tactics. Even tough, hardy Roman infantry broke apart against Parthian horse archers Tongue

Edited by Paradigm of Humanity - 03 Oct 2012 at 23:05
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Oct 2012 at 23:16
According to Rudi Paul Lindner, Huns became infantry when they reached eastern Europe. How do you think about this?

Edited by ancient historia - 03 Oct 2012 at 23:16
Back to Top
Paradigm of Humanity View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 18 Oct 2011
Location: Konstantiniyye
Status: Offline
Points: 919
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Oct 2012 at 23:26
Ohh my memory... It still suffers from 'national' education. Which taughted us Xiongnu as Huns and Huns as European Huns. I was speaking of Xiongnu.

Edited by Paradigm of Humanity - 03 Oct 2012 at 23:31
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Oct 2012 at 23:33
Xiongnu was divided into east and west. Western Xiongnu moved to west and west. And they threatened Goths resulting the collapse of Roman empire.
Back to Top
Paradigm of Humanity View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 18 Oct 2011
Location: Konstantiniyye
Status: Offline
Points: 919
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Oct 2012 at 23:42
Originally posted by ancient historia ancient historia wrote:

Xiongnu was divided into east and west. Western Xiongnu moved to west and west. And they threatened Goths resulting the collapse of Roman empire.

Well, that is arguable.

Originally posted by ancient historia ancient historia wrote:

According to Rudi Paul Lindner, Huns became infantry when they reached eastern Europe. How do you think about this?

But I hear this first time. Huns as infantry? I'm confused Wacko
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 00:05
Let me explain you about argument which Paul Lindner had made in "Nomadism, Horses, and Huns". In order for Huns to keep 100 thousands of horses, it is crucial for grasses of Hungary to be several meters. If you see Hungary grassland, it is really small. Therefore Huns were infantries after crossing Riv. Danube. I was also confused when I just learn this. However I got to know about this theory as I study more.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 00:22
Even though I am pretty sure much of this thread is derived from computer games, I'm voting Spartans.
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 00:33
I did not get these from computer games.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 01:11
You're from South Korea, so I respectfully disagree with you Wink
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 01:31
Let me vote for cataphract of Goguryeo. Goguryeo cataphract wore steel lamellar armours. Goguryeo is the first state to use stirrups. Goguryeo empire was also known for its advanced archery called parthian archery. Thus I vote for Goguryeo.
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 01:34
It is not right to discriminate specific nationality.

Edited by ancient historia - 04 Oct 2012 at 01:35
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 01:36
Originally posted by Constantine XI Constantine XI wrote:

You're from South Korea, so I respectfully disagree with you Wink



Do you think this is right?
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 02:17
I want more participation on this topic
Back to Top
Paradigm of Humanity View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 18 Oct 2011
Location: Konstantiniyye
Status: Offline
Points: 919
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 02:59
It would be more fun if you could be more specified about equipment and tactics of these warriors you mentioned. Because many of us only familiar with a part of them.

AFAIK (thanks to video games Tongue ):

heavy infantry of Roman empire: as everybody knows hardy trained soldiers, well equiped and armed with short swords called gladius. flexible but still formidable formations.

warrior of Gaul tribe: I know very little about Gauls apart from Asterix and Rome Total War LOL

cataphract of Goguryeo empire: Shamefully I know nothing about Goguryeo empire.

warrior of Viking kingdom: Vikings wasn't a single entity to my knowledge. As popular depiction I assume them with chain mail armours, helmets (without horns Tongue ), wide wooden shields and axes.

warrior of Aztec empire: no avaiable metalurgy to make weapons, so they were armed with clubs, but deadly clubs of course Tongue and maybe some animal hide as armour.

infantry of Spartan polis: classic greek phalanx formations...

warrior of Hun empire: I still believe they relied on horse archery.

pikeman of Macedonian kingdom: 9-10 metres of pikes in phalanx like tight formations.

cavalry of Scythai empire: classic nomad warriors...

elephant archer of Carthagean kingdom: as it says

spearman of Egyptian empire: no idea... pharaoh spearman?
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 03:23
Huns are also strong

Edited by ancient historia - 04 Oct 2012 at 03:34
Back to Top
Zagros View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
Kaveh ye Ahangar

Joined: 11 Aug 2004
Location: MidX,Engelistan
Status: Offline
Points: 12490
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 03:57
Obviosuly the Cimmerian warrior, Conan the Barbarian he would chew your cataphract up for breakfast then spit out the armour, stirrups and weapons
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
Back to Top
ancient historia View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary
Avatar

Joined: 03 Oct 2012
Location: South Korea
Status: Offline
Points: 27
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ancient historia Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 04:13
Could you please tell me who is cimmerian?
Back to Top
Zagros View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
Kaveh ye Ahangar

Joined: 11 Aug 2004
Location: MidX,Engelistan
Status: Offline
Points: 12490
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 04:55



"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
Back to Top
Mamal View Drop Down
Knight
Knight
Avatar

Joined: 30 Sep 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 98
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mamal Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 05:47
I would say Roman and Sasanid heavy cavalry were among most deadliest warriors. Carthagian war elephant and spartan hoplite were also strong. The most successful warriors were Mongols.
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 06:32
As ever the strongest were the ones that got there fustest with the mostest.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 06:39
I would say the toughest is debated between the Rajputs of India, and the Samurai of Japan.
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 06:45
My post wasn't entirely jocular. Strategy, tactics, logistics are all more important to winning campaigns than the strength of the warriors. (Given that that strength is crucially affected by being hungry, thirsty, sleepy, and tired let alone morale, all of which depend on logistics and effectiveness of command.)

Of course that's in real life.   
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
rider View Drop Down
King
King
Avatar

Joined: 09 Aug 2004
Location: Norwich, UK
Status: Offline
Points: 5520
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rider Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Oct 2012 at 07:26
Originally posted by gcle2003 gcle2003 wrote:

My post wasn't entirely jocular. Strategy, tactics, logistics are all more important to winning campaigns than the strength of the warriors. (Given that that strength is crucially affected by being hungry, thirsty, sleepy, and tired let alone morale, all of which depend on logistics and effectiveness of command.)

Of course that's in real life.   

Exactly! I waited for someone to mention this for a while now.

Who wins a 1 vs 1 is irrelevant (and I would mostly bet on the elephant if not the archer) as long as a unit is commanded in a better way, reinforced by a superior logistical system, and equipped with a commander who can raise the morale more. 

Back to Top
Henry Fleischmann View Drop Down
Janissary
Janissary


Joined: 24 Nov 2012
Location: Not given
Status: Offline
Points: 29
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Henry Fleischmann Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Nov 2012 at 09:36
 
I voted for Roman infantry. Most military historians I've read say they were more flexible than the Macedonian pikeman and could deal with broken ground, whereas the phalanx could not
 
Now if you mean just physically strong themselves I'd have to go with the Spartans, because they actually trained themselves out of existence, that is, it became so hard to remain a Spartan in good standing that they could not produce enough replacements.  Then again, a Roman Legionary was trained eight hours a day, 6 days a week for 5 years before he went into battle. 
 
Mind, it seems the Romans were in no way invincible. Good archers could stop them, as has been mentioned about Parthia and the German forest dwelling guerillas defeated them so badly that the whole idea of expansionism was discredited
Back to Top
Zagros View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
Kaveh ye Ahangar

Joined: 11 Aug 2004
Location: MidX,Engelistan
Status: Offline
Points: 12490
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Nov 2012 at 21:05
There is a difference between soldiers and warriors.  Warriors are individual fighters where as soldiers are team workers and, individually, as warriors may be no match in a 1v1 against a barbarian warrior
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
Back to Top
repeatsitself View Drop Down
Immortal Guard
Immortal Guard
Avatar

Joined: 16 Apr 2015
Status: Offline
Points: 3
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote repeatsitself Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Apr 2015 at 08:24
From this list, it's the Spartans, obviously. I wonder why Miyamoto Musashi wasn't included here. He's Japan's finest swordsman. A mention of the best knights of Japan here would make this list more competitive too. 
Back to Top
caldrail View Drop Down
Moderator
Moderator
Avatar

Joined: 21 Jan 2014
Location: Rushey Platt
Status: Offline
Points: 1232
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote caldrail Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Apr 2015 at 02:18
I nominate the Hittites of Asia Minor, the lost 'fourth empire', whose iron fisted warrior culture brought Egypt to the negotiation table after the Battle of Kadesh.

Edited by caldrail - 29 Apr 2015 at 02:19
http://www.unrv.com/forum/blog/31-caldrails-blog/
Back to Top
franciscosan View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master


Joined: 09 Feb 2015
Location: Littleton CO
Status: Offline
Points: 10289
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote franciscosan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2015 at 16:22
Once upon a time, a crowd asked an Olympic Wrester, who was the greatest wrestler.  He said, "Pericles."  The inquirer said "Pericles?  Surely you can beat Pericles."  The wrestler said, "you don't understand, I would throw Pericles and he would get up and convince the audience that he had thrown me, furthermore, not only would he convince the audience, he would convince me that I had been thrown, and thus he would win the match."  

Ok, I nominate the Pythagoreans, seriously.  Some people consider philosophers pantywaists, but the Pythagoreans could really kick a--, and more so, they could teach others how to kick a--, as well.  For their time, they taught the best, Alexander, the Theban Band, Philip, and the beginnings of Rome.
 
At Pythagoras' instigation, the wrestler and Pythagorean Milo dressed as Heracles and wearing his victory wreaths lead Kroton against Sybaris. Kroton probably first defeating Sybaris in a land battle and then damming the Sybaris River like was done in Babylon, storming the city.  This, in 510, caused the collapse of the Sybarite Empire which had trade relations up to Etruria (Etruscans).  In 510 BC, the Etruscan kingship in Rome also fell, probably a client state of Sybaris.  Thus begins the Roman Republic, the Pythagorean influences on its beginnings are concealed.  The Pythagoreans themselves taught that a city-state's people are autocthonic, born from the soil.  In other words, the Pythagoreans taught people to claim that customs, institutions and laws are self-generated, whether they are or not.  Plutarch mentions a statue raised in the Roman Republic dedicated to the wisest man, Pythagoras.
But it doesn't end there, Alexander the Great learned the oblique battle line from his father Philip.  The oblique battle line is a curved battle line which causes the enemy to break ranks in order to engage.  Philip learned from the Sacred Band when he was a hostage in Thebes.  Epaminondas used it to defeat the Spartan military, thus freeing the helots and re-establishing Messana.  With true Spartans decimated and their slaves freed, Sparta lapsed into obscurity.  It was Thebes and not Athens that offered an obstacle to Macedonian rule, and thus when Philip defeated Thebes, he destroyed as well.
Epaminondas (sp?) was a student of Lysis and Philolaus, Pythagoreans from Magna Graecia.  Perhaps, they learned it from the Pythagorean tradition, and perhaps it was this technique that gave Milo the tactic by which the Kroton's defeated Sybaris.
But the Pythagorean military tradition doesn't end there, the Pythagoreans were known for mathematics, and thus also for mechanics.  One particular Pythagorean, Zopyrus of Heraclea (named after Heracles, or he is also reported to be from Tarentum, the cofounder, with Thurium, of Heraclea Lucania) made siege engines for Syracusan tyrants and for Miletus.  Zopyrus didn't do the a-- kicking, he just made it possible for others to do so.
The Pythagorean and strategos Archytas of Tarentum never lost a battle, although one battle was lost when his city made him step down.  He was strategos for (6? 9?) years, although there was a law that allowed citizens to serve in the position for only one year.  Archytas was a friend to Plato, and ransomed him once, when he was taken by pirates.  He is known for his mechanics, although what survives in his name today is probably all spurious.
Tradition considers Plato to be the nineth in succession from Pythagoras and Aristotle the tenth, they of course were very influenced by Pythagoras, although the Pythagorean school, which soon was to die out, would not recognize them as successors.  Pythagoreanism had served its purpose, or rather, it was used and incorporated into the purposes of others.  
It is from Aristotle that we gain our understanding of the true doctrine of Pythagoras, not the superimposed Platonic tradition which appeared in the later writings of the Neoplatonists, in late antiquity.  Plato tried to make the philosopher-king, a king who was also a philosopher, wise, in Syracuse with Dionysius.  Plato was traumatized in his youth by the execution of Socrates, himself a great warrior.  Plato wanted to secure the place in Greek culture for philosophy, and the philosopher-king would do so.  Some might say Aristotle had more success than Plato in teaching a philosopher-king, teaching Alexander the Great, Ptolemy and other Macedonian Generals.  The Pythagoreans, Plato and Aristotle are not the kings, they are the kingmakers, from whence all power originates.
 
So I would like to know if I have convinced anyone that the Pythagoreans were (primarily behind the scenes), the biggest bad-a-- of their time.  If not, then why not?  ;)
Back to Top
wolfhnd View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 18 Feb 2015
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 816
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote wolfhnd Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2015 at 18:18
"So I would like to know if I have convinced anyone that the Pythagoreans were (primarily behind the scenes), the biggest bad-a-- of their time.  If not, then why not?  ;)"

Convinced me :-) but what about Sun Tzu?


Edited by wolfhnd - 17 Jul 2015 at 18:19
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.141 seconds.