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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Nov 2009 at 10:48
This day in the year 1632, Swedish king Gustav II Adolf was killed in a foggy Lutzen. This event is still remembered and, among other things, we today eat Gustav Adolfsbakelser, a special kind of pastry to honour the fallen king.

Gustav II Adolf at Lutzen, 1632

Pic from: http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/sl*get_vid_L%C3%BCtzen

Gustav Adolfsbakelse (Gustav Adolf pastry)

Pic from: http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/523/gabakelseldreverar4.jpg

The pastry was created in 1909 by Carl Brautigam in Gothenburg.



Edited by Carcharodon - 06 Nov 2009 at 11:23
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Nov 2009 at 16:45
Now that gcle has calmed down from all the fireworks celebrating the fact that the attempt to tickle the bun of one Stuart ended in failure--keep in mind that James probably had others assigned to do the task--let us get down to a rather interesting series of commemorations.
 
Apparently, Carch, must number himself among the Old Believers and just refuses to accept the Gregorian Calendar. The Battle of Lutzen took place on 16 November 1632, hence we still have ten days to go before Gustavus Adolphus experiences the wrath of God. Since losses between the Protestant and Imperial armies were about equal, the real victors at Lutzen were the French, who--rid of the pesky Vasa--could use their position to convert a religious struggle into an actual display of Realpolitik, and place all of those troublesome heretics at the service of French foreign policy.
 
Since the calendar and its headaches have already been noted, we must also remark that today in 1917, the urban proletariat of St. Petersburg kicked off the October Revolution by seizing the Winter Palace.
 
Now, for all you fans of imperialism, the presidential politics of the United States of America contains many a celebratory point for 6 November:
 
1900: After conducting a "splendid little war", William McKinley, Republican Party boss Hanna's pliant tool in the White House, was re-elected president defeating--who else but--William Jennings Bryan [the Democrats were once again plowing the fields of ephemeral American populism]. Just ten months later (6 September 1901), McKinley would die from an assassin's bullet in Buffalo, New York, and Hanna would lament: "That cowboy's in the White House!". Who else but Theodore Roosevelt?
 
On this day in 1956, despite a serious heart attack in 1955, Dwight David Eisenhower was re-elected president against the candidacy of Adlai Stevenson--his second attempt--under the catch phrase "I like Ike, Peace, and Prosperity". Who knew then that shortly thereafter in 1958 the US navy and its marines would be in Lebanon and the US Economy would begin a five year "recession" [no one likes the term depression specially since iproniazid had hit the mass market in 1957], for which the only cure came with the "Guns and Butter" of Lyndon Johnson. Here an aside: no kiddies, the Kennedy tax cut of 1961 was actually irrelevant specially if one keeps in mind that suddenly the Federal Government was foisting "100 billion dollar" annual budgets--shades of permanent war-footing economies.
 
 
Sound familiar?
 
1984: Ronald Reagan thrashes Walter Mondale (will the Democrats ever learn?) under a landslide of Electoral Votes from 49 states. Meanwhile stock traders forced to work the Exchange for the first time in 193 years open their session with shouts of Boo! Boo! Boo! Guess what? The market still jumped some 15 points upward on sales of over 100 million shares. Who says history does not repeat itself? Just a few years later, the economy once again goes into a tail-spin in 1987. Could it be that wars are now called "covert operations"?
 
On to more solemn events:
 
Today, in 1790, the Vatican appoints its first bishop for the fledgling American republic. John Carroll (of the Maryland  Carrolls) becomes Bishop of Baltimore. Exactly 150 years later, the Pope would "take" the White House!
 
1813: The Congreso de Chilpancingo proclaims the independence of Mexico (then known as New Spain), however Mexicans have been studiously ignoring the date ever since and stick to the actions of one Catholic priest and his Grito de Dolores of 16 September 1810. Certainly, it keeps the mind of the people off of the political messes encompassing the years 1813-1824.
 
1860: Abraham Lincoln comes out on top in the Electoral College. Exactly one year later, on 6 November 1861, Jefferson Davis becomes president of the Confederate States.
 
1911: Francisco Madero becomes president of Mexico. Mexicans go on to repeat the political chaos that marked the aftermath of Chilpancingo.
 
1913: The English make their first formal acquaintance of one M. K. Gandhi. Churchill's "fakir in a breechclout" is arrested by South African police for leading a march of Indian miners.
 
1918: Poland declares itself a republic; the experiment would last until 1939.
 
1936: The Radio Corporation of America displays the first "television" set. Who knew what would be in store for culture within a decade--OK kiddies how does one spell...
 
1956: The first Olympic boycott in history, for once the Spanish and the Dutch agree on something: Spain and the Netherlands refuse to participate in the 1956 Olympic Games because of events in Hungary.
 
1957: Felix Gaillard, radical French politician becomes Premier of France. The days of the Fourth Republic are numbered, in months actually. His "government" falls shortly after news that French forces in Algeria had bombed Tunisia in march of 1958! Le grande Charles bided his time.
 
1978: The Shah of Iran declares Martial Law.
 
1986: Ronald Reagan signs a new Immigration Bill with an amnesty process for "illegals". Guess what, it did not work...that fact should give the present occupant of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue pause.
 
Let's go for some high notes (or low brow disasters):
 
1814: Adolphe Sax is born...what would American modern jazz be without the saxophone!
1854: John Phillips Sousa's birthday...the same thing can not be said for the soussaphone.
1860: Ignace Jan Paderewski, musician and vintner--he put California zinfandel on the  wine map.
1946: Sally Field, do we really like her? Well boniva obviously does.
1947: George Young of AC/DC, the gay movement receives some free publicity.
1948: Glenn Frey of the Eagles. where would we be without Hotel California? Gettin' out, I hope.
 
Speaking of "getting out", today marks the first "concert" by the Sex Pistols in 1975. Could that be the reason why Debbie Boone's You Light Up My Life reached the top of the charts this day in 1977?
 
Now where would television drama be today were it not for the life of Caesare Lombroso. He was born this day in 1835, and would later establish the profession of "criminologist"--identifying criminal types on the basis of personality traits. Hear that Ulrich and Dolphin.
 
 


Edited by drgonzaga - 07 Nov 2009 at 03:29
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ilyes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Nov 2009 at 08:54
Nov,7th
in the year 680: the 3rd Council of Constantinople (6th ecumenical council) opens
year 1980: Steve McQueen Slater MO, actor, dies at the age of 50
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Nov 2009 at 09:25
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

 
Apparently, Carch, must number himself among the Old Believers and just refuses to accept the Gregorian Calendar. The Battle of Lutzen took place on 16 November 1632, hence we still have ten days to go before Gustavus Adolphus experiences the wrath of God. Since losses between the Protestant and Imperial armies were about equal, the real victors at Lutzen were the French, who--rid of the pesky Vasa--could use their position to convert a religious struggle into an actual display of Realpolitik, and place all of those troublesome heretics at the service of French foreign policy.


Well, we can argue forth and back about the calendars for ages but the fact is that the Gustav Adolf Day is celebrated in November 6, with the eating of pastries (and sometimes with demonstrations at his statues) and everything. Maybe all Swedes are old belivers and traditionalists (even if the tradition with the pastry is just 100 years old)  in this case.

By the way, I actually ate two pastries yesterday, one green and one pink. Both had silhouette heads of Gustav in dark chocolate.
 



Edited by Carcharodon - 07 Nov 2009 at 09:54
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Nov 2009 at 01:50
Now that Carch is sufficiently sated with cannibalistic style cake and since Saint Lucy's Day is still a while away, we hope he survives the interim...however time marches on regardless of his affinity for an out-of-date calendar. So, as we welcome 8 November let us pause a moment and ponder a few marigolds and doses of gamma rays: Today in 1895 William Roentgen took the first X-Ray photographs in history. An accident with an overheated electric device led to hours of pondering and hypothesizing until he came upon the scientific principle that allowed him to repeatedly duplicate the "accident". Think about that the next time you go to an airport.
 
Now that I've mentioned Carch, we should also recall that today in 1308 Duns Scotus died. Thanks to him the term "dunce" entered the English vocabulary.
 
At the other end of the life-spectrum, on this day in 1656 Edmund Halley came into the world.
 
However no birthday or wake could have been properly celebrated until this day in 1789: Elijah Craig distilled the first true "corn squeezin's" at Bourbon, Kentucky. Wild Turkey anyone?
 
Unfortunately, Prohibition was still in force on this day in 1932, consequently Franklin Delano Roosevelt carried the popular vote for the presidency. Howeverm no one still knows what californians were drinking on this day in 1966--or smoking for that matter: Ronald "Ray"gun was first elected governor of California. Could that be the reason why exactly a year later silver sells for $1.95 an ounce on London's commodity exchange? It would not take long for silverware to disappear from the tables of the fashionable, of for that matter silver coins--soon the US Mint drops the coinage of silver and begins zinc-coating copper slugs.
 
And for all of us with short memories: On this day in 1990, the United States deploys an additional 100,000 troops to the Persian Gulf and Saddam boldly declares he will destroy the Arabian Peninsula!
 
Speaking of deja vu, it was also on this day in 1993 that Bill Gates announced the release of Windows Workgroups 3.11 and trumpeted a new age of "performance and stability" in computing. Now in the age of Windows 7, one wonders just how long it will take for people to catch on to this gimmickry.
 
But then, intelligence is hardly a popular forte on the American scene, for example on this day in 1971, Cher's Gypsy, Tramps, and Thieves beats out John Lennon's Imagine to the top of the music charts. Buth then it was already an unlucky day for John since on this date three years earlier Cynthia Lennon had been granted a divorce, which proved Lennon was no gentleman, on the grounds of adultery. Subsequently she became a "serial" bride...and as with Yoko making money off of the corpse.
 
 


Edited by drgonzaga - 08 Nov 2009 at 01:51
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Nov 2009 at 14:33
November 10

Yesterday's important anniversary was the fall of the Berlin Wall (20 years).

Today -

1775   U.S. Marine Corps founded
1879   Little Bighorn participant Major Marcus Reno is caught window-peeping at the daughter of his commanding officer–an offense for which he will be court-martialed.
1971   Two women are tarred and feathered in Belfast for dating British soldiers, while in Londonderry, Northern Ireland a Catholic girl is also tarred and feathered for her intention of marrying a British soldier.
1975   The iron ore freighter Edmund Fitzgerald breaks in half and sinks at the eastern end of Lake Superior–all 29 crew members perish
...and Gordon Lightfoot shoots to the top of the charts.


Today's Births

1483   Martin Luther, theologian and reformer



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Nov 2009 at 18:54
While awaiting the silencing of the guns on the Western Front, let us take a close look at some really odd coincidences from History.
 
Yes, some might wish to commemorate the birth of that rapscallion Augustinian monk by the name of Luther, but today is the Feast Day of an even bigger "L"--Leo the Great, first pope of that name and essentially the man who brought Rome back to the front lines of world events. Pope Leo I dies on this date in AD 461.
 
And since I've mentioned one rapscallion, let us cite another: Voltaire, who at the age of 75 wrote a famous bon mot on this date in 1770--"If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him"...unfortunately some of today's great claimants to the mantle of skepticism refuse to recognize this sage advice.
 
Today is a dark day indeed for the Code Duelo, in 1801 the state of Kentucky outlaws dueling. The frontier might be a place for enlightenment, but not all states see it that way hence the stage is set for a little duel in New Jersey in 1804.
 
In the career of Louis Napoleon Bonaparte, 10 November marks both a low point and a high one: In 1836 he's banished to America by the monarchy of Louis Philippe; in 1864, now Napoleon III, he convinces Archduke Maximilian of Austria to accept the "crown" of Mexico.
 
This day, one should also recall one of the most irrelevant footnotes in History: As a result of an early example of journalistic jingoism, today in 1871, the reporter Stanley presumes to meet the supposedly "lost" Livingston at Ujiji. Can the "scramble" for Africa be far behind?
 
A lot of people came to prominence on the world stage on a 10 November:
 
1928: Hirohito is enthroned as Emperor of Japan...Bonzai!
1945: Enver Hoxha takes and keeps power in Albania. A little note here, Albania also becomes the site of the first covert operation by MI6 and the CIA (in 1949) for the removal of a political pest. It ends in failure.
1950: Jacobo Arbenz is elected president of Guatemala...the CIA meets with greater success here in 1954. Perhaps because the spy-ridden MI6 was not involved. Castillo Armas takes over the government and Central America is well on its way to becoming the basket case in US Latin American foreign policy for the rest of the century...the general public never had a clue.
 
 


Edited by drgonzaga - 10 Nov 2009 at 18:56
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2009 at 02:26
November 12th is a Trivia Master's Nirvana:
 
324 BC: The Era of Alexander begins [for the curious look up Philip Arrhidaeus]
AD 295: Era of Ascension [no not the island]
 
1035: Knute croaks at age 41 [kind of a rather brief time to be "Great"]
1859: Jules Leotard takes to the trapeze! Now you know why he invented "tights"!
1918: The second and last emperor of Austria-Hungary abdicates (Karl Who?)
1927: Trotsky expelled from the Communist Party
1938: Goering declares Madagascar an ideal Jewish homeland (the French were not amused).
1941: The German offensive runs out of steam in the suburbs of Moscow.
1946: Disney releases Song of the South through RKO in Atlanta...anyone seen a re-release?
1948: Tojo sentenced to death by the IWCT at Tokyo.
1979: Beginning of the US Embargo on Iran. Happy 30th, Ahmadinejad!
1989: Brazil elects its first president since Janio Quadros ending 25 years of military rule.
2001: The Taliban abandon Kabul (deja vu?)
2008: The first "bailout"...oh how quickly they forget!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2009 at 13:24
41 must have been a ripe old age back then. Feasting on meat, meat and more meat.
Bailout what was that? Didn't help me any?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2009 at 15:26
Originally posted by Seko Seko wrote:

41 must have been a ripe old age back then. Feasting on meat, meat and more meat.
Bailout what was that? Didn't help me any?
 
No, 41 was only a ripe, old age if you were a common urban laborer subject to the squalors of urban life (poor sanitation and little fresh air--now you know the real reasons for agoras and forums). Earlier I had mentioned Philip III Arrhidaeus (359-317 BC) now he made it to 42 despite Plutarch's gossip about Queen Olympias and her potions. Now his half-brother Alexander [another "great", 356-323 BC] was not so lucky in that department and if there is a moral to this story I guess it would be too much wine and too many boys can kill you early! In contrast, puritanical but still bibulous Claudius Drusus Nero made it into his 60s...which only leaves us with...
 
Now, Seko, you did receive a "bailout"--you know the stimulus payments--it's not the government's fault the sum did not even put a dent in your bar tabEvil Smile.
 
P.S.: For one thing, do not take Lionel Ritchie's All Night Long to heart...that will certainly kill you as it did Disco back on this day in 1983 when it reached #1 on the charts.


Edited by drgonzaga - 12 Nov 2009 at 15:34
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Nov 2009 at 15:55
NO worry, at that time I was more into AC/DC then pop girly tunes anyway.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2009 at 00:25
OK folks, today is Friday the 13th and of ill-omen to some; however, very few famous people met their end on this day...only three of note:
 
867: Pope Nicholas I, a no-nonsense type of guy when it came to both Carolingians and Byzantines. To Lothat II he affirmed no divorce, specially with a mistress at hand, and asserted the sancity of the marriage contract. With the Byzantines he was just as firm and it is at this juncture, with the eruption of the Ignatian Controversy (Ignatius v. Photius) in 857, that West and East lay the groundwork for disunion.
 
1466: Prince Henry the "Navigator", who by the way never navigated anywhere, dies on this date at age 66.
 
1868: G. A. Rossini, Italian composer...we have forgiven him for the William Tell Overture...HiYo Silver Away!
 
However, the same can not be said of people who came into the world on this date:
 
1312: Edward Plantagenet, King of England and the Third of that name. We will not go into the sordid family details...
 
1833: Edwin Booth, older brother of the more famous but less competent actor, John Wilkes...
 
1850: Robert Louis Stevenson, a rather good English writer, whose works have been abused by subsequent generations...argh, me hearties!
 
1856: Louis D. Brandeis, American jurist and second Jewish member of the US Supreme Court.
 
Now to the not so glamorous:
 
1002: Ethelred II begins murdering Danish settlers in England.
 
1775: American rebels take Montreal...the Expos would later grasp the futility of the effort.
 
1789: It is reported that it was on this day that old Ben Franklin wrote "Nothing [in life is] certain but death and taxes." We know that Ben did not like taxes but he proved true to his word about the other by promptly dying in 1790.
 
1865: The US Treasury issues its first "gold certificates" subsequent to the Currency Act of 1863...the practice came to an end 70 years later with the Gold Reserve Act of 1933. It became a crime for US citizens to transact in bullion.
 
1940: Walt Disney releases Fantasia, a classic today but a financial disaster then...no one was too enamoured of Stokowski.
 
1941: The Ark Royal sinks in the Mediterranean.
 
1955: First "live" telecast between countries, Havana-Miami--OK we're fudging here and will have to add "non-contiguous". Perhaps this is the real reason Batista's regime would fall three years later.
 
1969: Spiro Agnew delivers his famous "nittering nabobs of negativism" attack on the Media.
 
1970: Not satisfied...old Spiro once again goes after TV moguls and calls them "impudent snobs".
 
We all know what comes later...
 
Now for all you hedonists out there keep in mind that today in AD 354 Augustine of Hippo is born. So go out and sow your wild oats so that you too can later write a best-seller or two and then reach sainthood.
 
And in the never say never department:
 
On this day in 1564 Pope Pius IV issued his Professio Fidei as the last word on the Catholic Faith and then required all bishops and theologians to sign on...400 years on the Church was in Council tampering with its contents...
 


Edited by drgonzaga - 14 Nov 2009 at 00:28
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2009 at 00:39
1850: Robert Louis Stevenson, a rather good English writer, whose works have been abused by subsequent generations...argh, me hearties!

Is that some kind of sick joke?  The man was Scottish.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Akolouthos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2009 at 02:23
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

On this day in 1564 Pope Pius IV issued his Professio Fidei as the last word on the Catholic Faith and then required all bishops and theologians to sign on...400 years on the Church was in Council tampering with its contents...
 
Hey doc,
 
I was wondering if this was the profession of Trent, or if he issued a further document demanding that the decisions of Trent not be developed further. Sorry to bother, but I'm not as up on my Western ecclesiastical history, post schism, as I should be.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2009 at 14:25
Yes, the Professio Fidei of 1564 is usually known in shorthand as the Profession of Trent [few people recall that PP Paul VI issued a similar document shortly after the pastoral reforms known as Vatican II: Sollemnis Professio Fidei, 30 June 1968.]. Now this document should not be confused with the papal bull, Benedictus Deus of 26 January 1564 that confirmed the conclusions reached at Trent; instead, it is a separate papal letter as credal declaration known in shorthand as the "Creed of Pius IV". Interestingly, in view of more recent history, the pontificate of Pius IV has more or less "disappeared" from internet archives. Recall, he was also the pope who authorized communion in both kinds in Bohemia and Austria (despite Trent) as well as the pontiff that recognized variations within tradition for both the Spanish and French monarchies. We will not go into the fate of the Carafas...
 
Compare Pius IV with Paul VI:
 
 
 
*Note the date transcribed in this reference (1565) is wrong. Late in 1565 Pius IV was moribund (he dies on 9 December).
 
As an aside, it is actually PP Pius V, with the Roman Missal of 1570 that consolidates the credal and liturgical reforms of Trent; yet here again there was a significant proviso with regard to liturgical practices predating 1370 [e.g., Liturgiam Ambrosiana].
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2009 at 14:42
Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:

1850: Robert Louis Stevenson, a rather good English writer, whose works have been abused by subsequent generations...argh, me hearties!

Is that some kind of sick joke?  The man was Scottish.
 
The Master of Ballantrae and Kidnapped nothwithstanding, Stevenson practiced his craft in English and essentially produced the more famous of his novels at Bournemouth! We will not go into his "Western" voyages or just how come he lies buried in Hawaii. Would you prefer "writer of English"?
 
But hey...if it floats someone's boat to dwell on bonnie lasses and dour diivines...
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2009 at 15:05
I admit I checked out where Stevenson was born. I'm glad I did though because I discover that 'lighthouse design was the family profession' (cf wikipedia).
 
Am I wrong to find that disturbingly reminiscent of John Cleese and friends long ago now?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Akolouthos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2009 at 17:50
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Yes, the Professio Fidei of 1564 is usually known in shorthand as the Profession of Trent [few people recall that PP Paul VI issued a similar document shortly after the pastoral reforms known as Vatican II: Sollemnis Professio Fidei, 30 June 1968.]. Now this document should not be confused with the papal bull, Benedictus Deus of 26 January 1564 that confirmed the conclusions reached at Trent; instead, it is a separate papal letter as credal declaration known in shorthand as the "Creed of Pius IV". Interestingly, in view of more recent history, the pontificate of Pius IV has more or less "disappeared" from internet archives. Recall, he was also the pope who authorized communion in both kinds in Bohemia and Austria (despite Trent) as well as the pontiff that recognized variations within tradition for both the Spanish and French monarchies. We will not go into the fate of the Carafas...
 
Compare Pius IV with Paul VI:
 
 
 
*Note the date transcribed in this reference (1565) is wrong. Late in 1565 Pius IV was moribund (he dies on 9 December).
 
As an aside, it is actually PP Pius V, with the Roman Missal of 1570 that consolidates the credal and liturgical reforms of Trent; yet here again there was a significant proviso with regard to liturgical practices predating 1370 [e.g., Liturgiam Ambrosiana].
 
Thanks for the informative response, as well as for getting it back so soon. Smile The links should provide a bunch of stimulating material once I decide to stop being such a shameful slacker. Embarrassed
 
-Akolouthos
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lirelou Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Nov 2009 at 01:46
I always thought that the origin of Friday the 13th lay in Philippe le Bel's arrest of the Templars on Friday, 13 October 1307. Of course, in Spanish countries the tradition is Tuesday the 13th. Perhaps a difference in calendars?
Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá gì
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Nov 2009 at 03:59
With the rapid coming of winter, apparently the middle of November gets people into action in preparation for the hibernation of the coming cold.
 
A dispute over pasture between the Confederation of Uri, Schwyz and Unterwalden with the Monastery of Einseideln created a perfect opportunity for Leopold of Austria to seize the Gotthard Pass and more-or-less nullify the autonomy these cantons had gained back in 1291. Unfortunately, his armed knights--who planned to cut up the rabble with a force of some 5,000 near Lake Aegeri--were ambushed on 15 Novemebr at Morgarten Pass by some 1500 peasants who essentially made mince-meat of the armored knights as their footmen fled to the safety of Zug. The victory laid the foundation of the Confederation as other cantons, including Zug, adhered to the pact and the Habsburgs would not try again until 1389. Perhaps Charles the Bold should have read his history books before taking the field at Grandson in the winter of 1476. 
 
However, cold was not on the mind of one Christopher Columbus, who on this day in 1492 recorded the strange habits of the residents of the island of Juana (Cuba) and their use of a curious plant they called tabac. The Admiral of the Ocean Sea had already noticed these curious leaves upon his first arrival--they had been brought as gifts on Hispaniola--and wondered of their value; however today, two of his crew Rodrigo de Jerez and Luis de Torres, finally discovered their purpose: you light, inhale and enjoy. Jerez was hooked and became the first European to practice "smoking", not that there were no "habit police" even then. When Rodrigo pursued his fancy at his home town of Jerez, his neighbors denounced him to the Inquisition! After an uncomfortable seven years of interrogation, Rodrigo was released given that smoking had become the rage among the mariners of southern Spain.
 
Whether Francisco Pizarro was smoking or not, on this day in 1533 his forces entered the Inca capital of Cuzco after defeating the forces of Quisquis before the city and set Manco Inca as ruler of Tehuantinsuyo. These events would later produce the last gasp of Inca resistance, the siege of Cuzco from May 1536 to March 1537. Not that the Spanish were not fighting among themselves for the spoils either, as the Pizarros had to flee from their rescuer, Almagro--who had forced Manco Inca to lift the siege and retreat to Vilcabamba. History books--particularly the PC ones--tend to gloss over the details of these events so as to show the Amerind as helpless victims. Sorry, but the history here is far more complex...
 
Speaking of complexity, recall that the founders of New Plymouth were actually sailing for Virginia back in 1620 under the authority of the London Virginia Company, but actually landed somewhere else, the territory of the Plymouth Council, which had more or less succeded to the Letters Patent issued by James I to the Plymouth Company in 1606. Confused? Well, the Pilgrim fathers were not for on this day in 1626 they "buy out" their investors so as to establish clear title.
 
Staking out clear title was also a concern for other investors in American land ventures. Today in 1763 two surveyors by the names of Mason and Dixon begin to set the markers on what would later be known as the Mason-Dixon Line. This action is not unrelated to the earlier confusion as to who belonged where since the old demarcation for "New England" ran along the 40th parallel of latitude.
 
Today is also a day that but for fortune and folklore really marks the beginning of a national government for those rebellious upstarts that made it West in the 17th century. On 15 November 1777, the Continental Congress finally adopts a governing document for the United States of America: the Articles of Confederation. This original constitution was then despatched to the various states for ratification (a process completed in 1781).
 
But then, Americans have been arguing about the nature of their government ever since then so one should also note that on this day in 1864 one Major General by the name of William Tecumseh Sherman begins his "March to the Sea"...and no kiddies he did not set fire to Atlanta. Yes the decision to attack and take this railroad junction was a deliberate blow to the economy of the region, but...
 
 
It was General Hood's decision to destroy the munitions in the city during his evacuation on 1 September 1864 that began the so-called "burning"--see even Margaret Mitchell got this one right!
 
Now, the Brazilians had a more colorful means through which to settle diverging political viewpoints. On 15 November 1889, the ageing Emperor of Brazil, Dom Pedro II, was deposed through military subterfuge and a heavy bit of melodrama as the coup leaders were well aware of the popularity of their sovereign and his daughter--she who in 1888 had proclaimed the end of slavery in Brazil--as events would soon prove since Deodoro da Fonseca, under the title of Republic established the first military dictatorship in Brazilian history. 
 
Hey, did anyone know that today in 1939, "socialism" had a red letter day! The Social Security Administration issues its first "unemployment check"...a bit late one might say seeing that the "depression" was now ten years old. Slightly different than the "red letter" day in 1917 when Kerensky flees Petrograd and the Bolsheviks take control of Moscow.
 
In the Annals of Futility there are several events to add:
 
1920: The League of Nations holds its first meeting at Geneva. Its first action, the creation of the "Free City of Danzig".
 
1937: A slew of lawsuits are initiated to dissolve the TVA...fat chance since it is also on this day that "air conditioning" is provided the Congress.
 
1963: Argentina voids all foreign oil contracts.
 
1969: Janis Joplin accused of vulgar and indecent language at Tampa, Florida.
 
1977: Jimmy Carter welcomse the Shah of Iran on a state visit.
 
1979: MI6 finally catches on to Sir Anthony Blount
 
1988: The PLO recognizes Israel's "right to exst"...
 
1990: Milli Vanilli didn't sing their music...given the current rash of singers who can't carry a note one must wonder what that was all about.
 
1991: Dow Jones has one of its periodic nose-dives, from now on Wall Street is the economy, stupid!
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Nov 2009 at 04:21
Originally posted by lirelou lirelou wrote:

I always thought that the origin of Friday the 13th lay in Philippe le Bel's arrest of the Templars on Friday, 13 October 1307. Of course, in Spanish countries the tradition is Tuesday the 13th. Perhaps a difference in calendars?
 
Naw, but triskaidekaphobia is hardly unique since in the context of other cultures this fate befalls many a number. In all probability we can blame the Norse as well as anyother...haven't you noted the disruptive qualities usually introduced by Carch into any discussionWink
 
The bit with the Templars is little more than contemporary imagining...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ulrich von hutten Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Nov 2009 at 07:46
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

   
 

1990: Milli Vanilli didn't sing their music...given the current rash of singers who can't carry a note one must wonder what that was all about.
 


thats, in deed, one the most disappointing moments in the history of mankind......
man, i'm gonna miss them......
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Nov 2009 at 02:11
My how time flies...it is now 16 November 2009 but we'd only be in the ninth months of the year (that is what November means) were it not for the papacy! They had already brought forth a new calendar in 1582 during the pontificate of PP Gregory XIII, and now on this date in 1621, the papal chancery decreed the official year would begin its count on 1 January and not in March. No matter what Wikipedia maintains their assertions on the this topic are wrong. Given that in Catholic countries, 1 January represented, the Christmas Octave, its celebration had nothing to do with ushering a New Year...however, since the Catholic Church had its own intricate dating system in terms of pontificates and the Roman foundation it took a while for anyone to notice.
 
Hey, while talking about things Roman let us all sing a happy birthday to one Tiberius Julius Caesar Augustus nee Tiberius Claudius Nero on this date in 42 BC. The BBC did nothing to improve his much maligned reputation. At least Rome never had formal prisons, which brings us to another November event.
 
Today, is actually the birthday of the world's largest prison system, that of the United States of America (hey, running prisons is profitable). In 1676 the colony of Massachussets establishes its first prison on Nantucket Island. Take that you Frenchies and that johnny-come-late Devils Island!
 
Today, should be a day of deep mourning for the musically inclined. On 16 November 1959, Mary Martin took to a New York stage as Maria von Trapp when The Sound of Music made its official debut. Children, sugar and nazis, oh my!
 
At least one can take heart from the fact that on this day in 1873 W. C. Handy came into the world at Florence, Alabama. The 12-bar blues would soon be forthcoming...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Nov 2009 at 00:54
Let us get down to the nitty-gritty for 17 November by mentioning the really trivial with long range consequences:
 
The day of pseudo-religious malarkey that presaged the New Age finally dawns in America: The American Theosophical Society is organized by one Madame Blavatsky and a certain "Colonel" Olcott on 17 November 1875.
 
With the truly outrageous out of the way let us note than on this day in 1869, the Suez Canal opened with the Empress Eugenie of France at the head of a large flotilla. The premiere of Aida by Verdi capped the festivities. Now we know which Egyptians the Europeans really liked. Not by coincidence exactly 44 years later in 1913, the Panama Canal opens to traffic--was this a slap at the earlier French failure on the isthmus?
 
Today, also marks the ascension in 1558 of the last English monarch to claim the French throne: Elizabeth I Tudor...OK I am exaggerating here but at least Liz had a degree of history on her side as a Lancastrian. Not so any future occupant and it took George III of fond memory to finally drop the pretense in 1802 under the Treaty of Amiens.
 
Speaking of pretense, today in 1973, Richard Nixon protested: "I am not a crook!"
 
For the truly pious, way back in the 3rd century, Clement of Alexandria (AD c.150-220) speculated that the Christ was actually born on 17 November of 3 BC. Well, at least the season of Advent still falls in November...


Edited by drgonzaga - 18 Nov 2009 at 19:48
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2009 at 13:54
Artsy trivia that is November 18

1894, 1st newspaper Sunday color comic section published (NY World). 1st comic strip "Origin of a New Species," by Richard Outcault

In 1928, Walt Disney's first sound-synchronized animated cartoon, "Steamboat Willie" starring Mickey Mouse, premiered in New York.

On Nov. 18, 1959, "Ben-Hur," MGM's Biblical-era spectacle starring Charlton Heston and directed by William Wyler, had its world premiere at Loew's State Theatre in New York.






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2009 at 14:38
Originally posted by Seko Seko wrote:

On Nov. 18, 1959, "Ben-Hur," MGM's Biblical-era spectacle starring Charlton Heston and directed by William Wyler, had its world premiere at Loew's State Theatre in New York.
Who won the chariot race?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2009 at 18:18
It's been a long time since I saw the movie but I'll go with Heston. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2009 at 18:31
You giving odds? The streak has to end some time.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2009 at 18:36
LOL Odds, sure does make my post sound future tense


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2009 at 20:50
Originally posted by Seko Seko wrote:

Artsy trivia that is November 18

1894, 1st newspaper Sunday color comic section published (NY World). 1st comic strip "Origin of a New Species," by Richard Outcault
 
Gotcha! We'll leave Walt and Charleston out of it so as to question the truly important matter: the integrity of the Comics!
 
Richard Felton Outcault, while significant in the history of "comics" was beat to the punch by James Swinnerton who debuted his The Little Bears for Hearst's San Franciso Examiner in 1892-1893. What is interesting however is that the comic strip actually became a vital weapon in the Hearst-Pulitzer feud. Although, technically, The Little Bears made their first appearance as a banner page for the Examiner on 1 June 1892, it was not a Sunday and while in color was an integral part of the newspaper and not a supplement. The first Sunday comic supplement appeared in the Chicago Daily Inter-Ocean but these "comics" did not touch recurring characters and the newspaper itself would soon founder as a result of Chicago politics in 1902. But hey, be they Bears, Yellow Kids, or even Buster Brown, the real honor for the Sunday Funnies belongs to Rudolph Dirks and The Katzenjammer Kids that first appeared in 1897 as a story narrative. The boom would soon follow with the new century but not without constant law suits betweem Hearst and Pulitzer and both of these with the creative artists! Regardless, both Dirks and Outcault are worthy of memory, since Buster Brown, now residing in a shoe, and the Captain and the Kids went on as the personal property of their creators and not the media moguls. Dirks' strip lasted as a fixture on the Sunday pages until his death in 1979. nevertheless, by the 1920s no newspaper dare publish without a Sunday color comic supplement and from the Little King to Little Iodine to Little Lulu and Bringing Up Father, Blondie, and all the rest, an American art genre arose.
 
By the way, Hearst eventually came out the winner in his feud with Pulitzer and his "cartoon arm", King Features still survives:
 
 
With Pulitzer long gone, only the odd-ball comics challenge the phantom of "Citizen Kane" Hearst!
 
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