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Today's Arab youth

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calvo View Drop Down
Chieftain
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    Posted: 06 Feb 2011 at 21:33
Most of the recent revolts in the Arab World have been led by the young generation.

As far as most of the socio-economic analysis goes, the revolts are mostly for economic reasons: high unemployment, low pay, widespread poverty and lack of future opportunities. It is said that around 40% of Tunisian, Algerian, and Moraccans of 18-30 would emigrate to another country and never come back if they could.
The traditional lifestyle is also under threat. Historically most people in these countries married young, but today, due to widespread unemployment, many young men and women are delaying their marriage age till their late 20s and 30s.

What I'm also interested in finding out is about the changes in "social attitudes" of Arab youth.
Due to the Internet, most of them are having more access to outside cultures and lifestyles than ever.
Has anyone ever made any studies on the following subjects:
- have Arab youths become more sexually liberal?
- do they desire to live a more independent lifestyle like in western countries?
- have they views of gender-relations changed compared to their parents?



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Omar al Hashim View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Omar al Hashim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Feb 2011 at 08:21
I'll just point out that generally all social upheavals are pushed by the youth - they're usually the ones most able to head into the streets.
Also, I think you'd find most wars are fought by youth.
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eventhorizon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eventhorizon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Mar 2011 at 12:27
Like the ever increasing entropy and ever expanding universe, the only constant for human society is change, Arabs or any other groups are no exceptions to the rule.

The Arab revolt and betrayal against Ottomans, Sykes Picot, the establishment of Tin Pot kingdoms, Cold war, inroad of socialism and establishment of Military tin pot dictators are now all crumbling down like so many houses of cards.

The newly democratic states need to pool together in an Arab league eventually, as I predicted earlier in another thread. But oil rich states would not want to share their wealth with the states that have no oil, so we may have to wait till oil runs out to see more movement in this direction. But surely there will be increasing mutual support and coordination between more democratic Arab states, as they no longer have the whimsical kings and dictators standing in their way.


Edited by eventhorizon - 05 Mar 2011 at 12:28
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Omar al Hashim View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Omar al Hashim Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 Mar 2011 at 17:36

I'm not sure that an expanding universe directly affects our politics, but then again, who would know?

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opuslola View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote opuslola Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Mar 2011 at 09:54
"The event horizon" wrote;
 
"The newly democratic states need to pool together in an Arab league eventually, as I predicted earlier in another thread. But oil rich states would not want to share their wealth with the states that have no oil, so we may have to wait till oil runs out to see more movement in this direction. But surely there will be increasing mutual support and coordination between more democratic Arab states, as they no longer have the whimsical kings and dictators standing in their way."
 
Pray tell that if democracy allows the reproduction of an Iranian state in all of these N. African states, then just what good is "democracy?"  The inmates will then be in charge of the institution!
 
But, of course that explains the actions of a lot of the powers on this planet today!
 
But, in Iran it seems, the young people have come to actually desipise the "institution" of the Islamic Law! But, is there really a chance that they will suceed?  And, just what could replace Islam in countries where the very holding of a Christian Bible, will get one the death sentence?
 
Please show me the nation full of very friendly and "open" (to other religions) Moslems?  Please? 
 
Ok, that is if they do not have a gun to their heads!
 
Regards,
 
Ron



Edited by opuslola - 06 Mar 2011 at 10:00
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Al Jassas View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Mar 2011 at 14:46
Originally posted by opuslola opuslola wrote:

"The event horizon" wrote;
 
"The newly democratic states need to pool together in an Arab league eventually, as I predicted earlier in another thread. But oil rich states would not want to share their wealth with the states that have no oil, so we may have to wait till oil runs out to see more movement in this direction. But surely there will be increasing mutual support and coordination between more democratic Arab states, as they no longer have the whimsical kings and dictators standing in their way."
 
Pray tell that if democracy allows the reproduction of an Iranian state in all of these N. African states, then just what good is "democracy?"  The inmates will then be in charge of the institution!
 
But, of course that explains the actions of a lot of the powers on this planet today!
 
But, in Iran it seems, the young people have come to actually desipise the "institution" of the Islamic Law! But, is there really a chance that they will suceed?  And, just what could replace Islam in countries where the very holding of a Christian Bible, will get one the death sentence?
 
Please show me the nation full of very friendly and "open" (to other religions) Moslems?  Please? 
 
Ok, that is if they do not have a gun to their heads!
 
Regards,
 
Ron

 
A classic example illustrating that Goebels was right.
 
Al-Jassas
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eventhorizon View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eventhorizon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Mar 2011 at 22:34
Iran's history is a bit different than Arab world. After Mongol invasion it quickly swung back, had native or pseudo native dynasties since then and was never under imperial domination like the Seljuk and Ottoman's as was the case for most of Arab world. My guess is that this long period of domination, which I prefer to call a break in Historical Continuity, did something negative for the Arab society, because of which it was easy for them to fall prey to Anglo-French machinations. The subsequent Tinpots (monarchs or nationalist/socialist military ruler) are a natural extension to the phase in Arab history that is tied with Euro/US influence. This new revolution/uprising is the beginning of the end of the era of the Tinpots that started at the fall of Ottoman. It is also a new morning for Arabs which shows that some of the negative effect of the long imperial domination is finally melting away. Arabs are finally finding their voice it seems, not the false voice of Egyptian Brotherhood, Saudi Wahabi and its combination in Salafi Al Qaeda, but their voice as human beings like the others in the rest of the planet, that dream of a better tomorrow.

Now about Iran, one needs to go back slightly more than the 1979 Khomeini revolution and look at how  Shah Pahlavi was installed, overthrowing a nascent democratic govt., to understand how this eventuality came about in Iran. We always find external hands caught in the cookie jar it seems.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosadegh

Now fast forward to present, in Iran the situation is different, it had its populist anti dictator revolution in 1979, unfortunately it was hijacked by the Mullah's. Even their hold in Iran was not so strong initially, but again external hand instigated the neighbor to attack and the long and devastating Iraq-Iran war was the factor that consolidated Mullah regime's power over Iran, just my superficial impression.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Army_of_the_Guardians_of_the_Islamic_Revolution
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basij

The Arab world has nothing like the above. The level of corruption in Iranian leadership is also not like what we have in the Arab world. Nevertheless, the Iranian youth and people are waking up and getting tired of a regime that has clearly become an obstacle for their socio-economic progress and advancement. In the next 5-10 years a time will come when the Revolutionary Guard and Basij themselves will convert sufficiently to the cause of the new generation and will no longer have the stomach to kill their own brothers and sisters during protests. Unless the Mullah regime goes for meaningful reform, their days are numbered just like the Arab Tinpots, but its not a matter of weeks or months but years.

As for the Arab world becoming more Islamic due to democracy, that is bound to happen, but I hardly think it will be of the Wahabi or Bin Laden variant or a regime like Iran, instead if anything, more self governance, less outside interference and less repression will reduce the effectiveness of the rallying cry of Al Qaeda. There will be bumps in the road just like evolution of any other society, but eventually they will produce better human beings and better democratic societies.

Whether they will be friendly to any particular group, I think that depends on how they are dealt with from now on, as the past will continue to linger in the mind. But one can always break from the past when the situation requires it. The relationship will definitely transform from one of manipulator/manipulated to one of peers or at least buyer/seller and perhaps friends and partners in the future, depending on how things play out for individual countries.



Edited by eventhorizon - 06 Mar 2011 at 23:51
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote calvo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Mar 2011 at 20:16
Originally posted by eventhorizon eventhorizon wrote:

I
As for the Arab world becoming more Islamic due to democracy, that is bound to happen, but I hardly think it will be of the Wahabi or Bin Laden variant or a regime like Iran, instead if anything, more self governance, less outside interference and less repression will reduce the effectiveness of the rallying cry of Al Qaeda. There will be bumps in the road just like evolution of any other society, but eventually they will produce better human beings and better democratic societies.



Do you reckon that young Arabs today have become more religious compared to their parents, or less so? Is there a difference from country to country?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Mar 2011 at 00:12
Originally posted by Al Jassas Al Jassas wrote:

Originally posted by opuslola opuslola wrote:

"The event horizon" wrote;
 
"The newly democratic states need to pool together in an Arab league eventually, as I predicted earlier in another thread. But oil rich states would not want to share their wealth with the states that have no oil, so we may have to wait till oil runs out to see more movement in this direction. But surely there will be increasing mutual support and coordination between more democratic Arab states, as they no longer have the whimsical kings and dictators standing in their way."
 
Pray tell that if democracy allows the reproduction of an Iranian state in all of these N. African states, then just what good is "democracy?"  The inmates will then be in charge of the institution!
 
But, of course that explains the actions of a lot of the powers on this planet today!
 
But, in Iran it seems, the young people have come to actually desipise the "institution" of the Islamic Law! But, is there really a chance that they will suceed?  And, just what could replace Islam in countries where the very holding of a Christian Bible, will get one the death sentence?
 
Please show me the nation full of very friendly and "open" (to other religions) Moslems?  Please? 
 
Ok, that is if they do not have a gun to their heads!
 
Regards,
 
Ron

 
A classic example illustrating that Goebels was right.
 
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calvo View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote calvo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Mar 2011 at 20:23
As far as my knowledge goes, the lifestyle of most Arab youngsters can be very diverse: from those who are completely westernised and secular to those who strictly adhere to the preachings of the Koran.
In Tunisia, Lybia, and Egypt, Islamist parties were often oppressed by the authoritarian regimes. Now under the new democratic governments, would the Islamist and secular sections of society be able to coexist in peace and respect each other's differences?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Mar 2011 at 21:17
By the way, I hate to be in shoes of the poor sod who tried to "confiscate" the bible from these blokes:
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote calvo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Nov 2011 at 17:50
I'd like to revive this thread....

When the Tunisian revolt occurred earlier this year when thousands of youths protested against the government, the face of Tunisian youth often appeared in the public eye as the girl of this blog:

http://www.atunisiangirl.blogspot.com/

At least from the way she looks and for the issues that she campaigns for, she has far more in common with the left-winged, revolutionary youth of European and American countries than with the veiled Islamists.
However, during the latest democratic elections, the Islamic party is the political force that has won the largest number of votes.

Therefore, I have been intrigued as to the social, poltiical, and religious mentality of the bulk of Tunisian youth. Are they becoming more religious or more westernised?






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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 Nov 2011 at 13:09
I would like to know as well. The little i hear is that there is some disillusionment occurring with the youth towards the religious elements?
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