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Your oldest tree?

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Carcharodon View Drop Down
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    Posted: 20 Oct 2009 at 13:29
What is your countrys oldest tree?
 
In Sweden we have a spruce where the oldest part of its root system is said to be 9500 years old. Otherwise our oldest tree is maybe the Rumskulla oaktree in the province of Smaland which is about 1000 years old. It is also one of Swedens largest trees.
 
The Rumskulla oak
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SPQR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Oct 2009 at 02:41


Prometheus (aka WPN-114) was the nickname given to the oldest known non-clonal organism, a Great Basin Bristlecone Pine (Pinus longaeva) tree growing near tree line on Wheeler Peak in eastern Nevada, USA. The tree, which was at least 4862 years old and likely approaching or over 5000 years, was cut down in 1964 by a graduate student and U.S. Forest Service personnel for research purposes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Oct 2009 at 10:18
Research is good, but to cut down one of the worlds oldest organisms? No!
 
What about if these trees could speak!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote rider Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Oct 2009 at 09:41
They'd tell us all we'd ever wanted to know.
 
I think our oldest tree is a very old oak, but I can't remember it's name (and therefore provide you with a picture).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Oct 2009 at 12:05
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

 
In Sweden we have a spruce where the oldest part of its root system is said to be 9500 years old.
 
There is actually a couple of spruces where the roots are this old and another few with slightly younger root systems.
The two oldest is Old Rasmus in the province of Haerjedalen and Old Tjikko in the province of Dalarna. The exact location of Old Rasmus is a secret since Old Tjikko, when its age where published, attracted the attention of New Agers and others. Thus one woman from England wanted to come and with a stetoscope listen to the sound of life inside the tree. An anti wrinkel researcher from USA wanted to come and extract chemicals from the tree to make an antiwrinkle cream. People from Japan, Chile and other countries also announced their desire to come there. Many ordinary tourists also wanted to go there and collect some of the trees needles to make tea, and other wanted to take twigs as souvenirs. So now the local authorities are thinking of putting a fence around Old Tjikko. Because of this fuzz the exact location of Old Rasmus is kept a secret.


Edited by Carcharodon - 29 Oct 2009 at 12:06
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Pabbicus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Oct 2009 at 13:26
I don't think any trees over 300 years old should be cut down. Maybe take a sample or two, but not to kill it! Something that old is too important to be turned into paper or to burn a fire for a few hours.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Oct 2009 at 13:35
Originally posted by Pabbicus Pabbicus wrote:

I don't think any trees over 300 years old should be cut down. Maybe take a sample or two, but not to kill it! Something that old is too important to be turned into paper or to burn a fire for a few hours.


Agree with you. Old trees should be left alone.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Styrbiorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Oct 2009 at 13:47

Originally posted by Pabbicus Pabbicus wrote:

I don't think any trees over 300 years old should be cut down. Maybe take a sample or two, but not to kill it! Something that old is too important to be turned into paper or to burn a fire for a few hours.


Aye, it's better to kill the baby trees.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Nov 2009 at 14:09
Some baby treas and some older trees one must cut, but one must save enough many so there will be some really old ones left. Old trees, and also dead trees, are very important for many other species and for the whole ecosystem.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2009 at 13:29
In Australia (well, Tasmania) we have the Huon Pine which can be up to several thousand years old; even 10 000 years depending upon how you define a single organism.

And though they don't have the oldest living single trees, Wollemi pines are significant 'old trees' that I can't help but mention in this thread. Thought to be long extinct ('from the time of the dinosaurs' as they say) it was recently found in a gorge in New South Wales, and now extensive seed bank and protective measures have been taken to ensure this ancient plant's survival.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2009 at 13:32


Above: The Huon Pine, a magnificently majestic tree



Above: The Wollemi Pine
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2009 at 13:38
Indeed very venerable organisms. 

Edited by Carcharodon - 19 Nov 2009 at 13:40
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Knights Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Nov 2009 at 13:51
Yes, as they grow, the grand pines and eucalypts like those of the Tasmanian old growth forests truly become their own microecosystems. You can see the various bryophytes (eg. moss) and lichens supported by the Huon Pine in the image. These makes fantastic homes for small forest floor invertebrates. Then further up the tree, ferns can sprout from damp forks in the tree's branches, often acting as mini ponds for frogs and mosquito larvae. And then you have hollows which provide a habitat for bats, possums or birds to nest and roost. There are also the cones that the pine bears, and its needles, both vital food sources for a host of organisms.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Dec 2009 at 04:15
Yes, trees as their own ecosystems is really a fascinating subject. An oak, as the one I mentioned first in this thread, can harbor around 1500 different species. There can be mosses, lichens, invertebrates, mammals, birds and so on. Some species of insects are totally dependent on oaktrees and if the trees are gone those insects are gone too.

For example our biggest beetle, the Ekoxe (Lucanus cervus) is one of those species that are bound to the oak for its suvival.


Ekoxe (pic from Wikipedia)




Edited by Carcharodon - 30 Dec 2009 at 04:17
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Apr 2014 at 03:36
Originally posted by Knights Knights wrote:

In Australia (well, Tasmania) we have the Huon Pine which can be up to several thousand years old; even 10 000 years depending upon how you define a single organism.

What do you mean "well, Tasmania"?
 
Is this another attempted slur on our state?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote caldrail Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Apr 2014 at 12:52
The oldest tree I know of in my area (and I don't know if it's still alive) is an oak in Savernake Forest, which sprouted more or less the same time William the Conqueror waded ashore. So that's a modest 950 years roughly. Quite old for a british tree.
http://www.unrv.com/forum/blog/31-caldrails-blog/
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