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Universal literature inspired in Chile

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    Posted: 07 Jun 2014 at 17:11
Well, you know I am chilean, a citizen of a small country few people knows. Confused
Our contribution to the development of the world has been minimal, and sometimes we see ourselves just as witness of what happens elsewhere in the world.
However, Chile has contributed in strange ways, and unwillingly, to world's culture... and I am not thinking in Isabel Allende Wink. I am thinking in two famous books of the universal literature, that nobody knows were inspired in Chile.

(1) Robinson Crusoe

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/ist/?next=/history/the-real-robinson-crusoe-74877644/

The real Robinson Crusoe who inspired the fantastic novel was a Scottish sailor that was abandoned Chilean island. Far from being a tropical place with bananas and Melanesian natives (Friday), the place is cold and cloudy most of the year, and the island wasn't populated at the time.

(2) Moby Dick

The novel of Melville was inspired in a real sperm whale called Mocha Dick, that lived along Chilean coast. Part of the supernatural myths associated to Mocha Dick is based in the Mapuche myth of the passing to the other world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mocha_Dick

This article in Spanish explains the link with the Trempulcahue, the whale that carry the souls of the dead to the after world

http://www.lanacion.cl/moby-dick-la-ballena-mapuche/noticias/2005-09-24/172621.html
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jun 2014 at 08:57
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Well, you know I am chilean, a citizen of a small country few people knows. Confused
Our contribution to the development of the world has been minimal, and sometimes we see ourselves just as witness of what happens elsewhere in the world.
However, Chile has contributed in strange ways, and unwillingly, to world's culture... and I am not thinking in Isabel Allende Wink. I am thinking in two famous books of the universal literature, that nobody knows were inspired in Chile.

(1) Robinson Crusoe

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/ist/?next=/history/the-real-robinson-crusoe-74877644/

The real Robinson Crusoe who inspired the fantastic novel was a Scottish sailor that was abandoned Chilean island. Far from being a tropical place with bananas and Melanesian natives (Friday), the place is cold and cloudy most of the year, and the island wasn't populated at the time.

(2) Moby Dick

The novel of Melville was inspired in a real sperm whale called Mocha Dick, that lived along Chilean coast. Part of the supernatural myths associated to Mocha Dick is based in the Mapuche myth of the passing to the other world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mocha_Dick

This article in Spanish explains the link with the Trempulcahue, the whale that carry the souls of the dead to the after world

http://www.lanacion.cl/moby-dick-la-ballena-mapuche/noticias/2005-09-24/172621.html
 
Really? is this all true?
 
 
"Tá mé bródúil as mo oidhreacht na hÉireann".
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jun 2014 at 13:43
Absolutely.
But there are more, of course, for instance Verne's "Lighthouse of the end of the World" was also inspired on it.

The epic poem "La Araucana" by Alonso de Ercilla was written in Chile during the conquest, and it is mentioned as part of the library of Alonzo Quijano (Don Quixote) in the masterpiece "The Quixote" of Miguel de Cervantes.







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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jun 2014 at 02:32
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Absolutely.
But there are more, of course, for instance Verne's "Lighthouse of the end of the World" was also inspired on it.

The epic poem "La Araucana" by Alonso de Ercilla was written in Chile during the conquest, and it is mentioned as part of the library of Alonzo Quijano (Don Quixote) in the masterpiece "The Quixote" of Miguel de Cervantes.

 
How about "La Cucharacha"?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jun 2014 at 04:24
"La cucharacha" is a Mexican folk song that speaks about the effects of Marihuana consumption. Nothing to do with Chile, sir.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jun 2014 at 06:43
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

"La cucharacha" is a Mexican folk song that speaks about the effects of Marihuana consumption. Nothing to do with Chile, sir.

 
The  Cockroach had no marijuana.Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 2014 at 02:53
I expected some more interesting comments from you on this topic.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 2014 at 04:08
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

I expected some more interesting comments from you on this topic.
 
 
Sorry mate, I admit that I don't know much, if anything, about this topic.
 
Let me do some research and I'll see what I can come up with.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 2014 at 06:28
Pinguin:
My reference says that it was an Argintinian Island, see below:-
 
Quote
By Richard Alleyne, Science Correspondent
4:41PM GMT 30 Oct 2008
Cast away on a desert island, surviving on what nature alone can provide, praying for rescue but at the same time fearing the sight of a boat on the horizon.
These are the imaginative creations of Daniel Defoe in his famous novel Robinson Crusoe.
But the story is believed to be based on the real-life experience of Scottish sailor Selkirk, marooned in 1704 on a small tropical island in the Pacific for more than four years, and now archaeological evidence has been found to support his existence on the island.
An article in the journal Post-Medieval Archaeology claims that an archaeological dig on the Argentinian island of Aguas Buenas, 470 miles off the Chilean coast, reveals evidence of the campsite of an early European occupant.
The most compelling evidence is the discovery of a fragment of a pair of navigational dividers which could only have belonged to a ship's master or navigator, which historical evidence suggests Selkirk must have been.
In Selkirk's rescuer, Captain Woodes Rogers' account of what he saw on arrival at Aguas Buenas in 1709 lists "some practical pieces" and mathematical instruments amongst the few possessions that Selkirk had taken with him from the ship.
Dr David Caldwell, National Museums Scotland, who helped lead the dig, said the find finally confirmed the whereabouts of the castaway camp.
"The evidence uncovered at Aguas Buenas corroborates the stories of Alexander Selkirk's stay on the island and provides a fascinating insight into his existence there.," he said.
"I am satisfied in my mind that this is the place where Selkirk set up his camp. I never thought we had a chance of finding it but the discovery of the divider was crucial."
The finds also provide an insight into exactly how Selkirk might have lived on the island.
Postholes suggest he built two shelters near to a freshwater stream, and had access to a viewpoint over the harbour from where he would be able to watch for approaching ships and ascertain whether they were friend or foe.
Accounts written shortly after his rescue describe him shooting goats with a gun rescued from the ship, and eventually learning to outrun them, eating their meat and using their skins as clothing.
He also passed time reading the Bible and singing psalms, and seems to have enjoyed a more peaceful and devout existence than at any other time in his life.
Alexander Selkirk was born in the small seaside town of Lower Largo, Fife, Scotland in 1676. A younger son of a shoemaker, he was drawn to a life at sea from an early age. In 1704, during a privateering voyage on the Cinque Ports, Selkirk fell out with the commander over the boat's seaworthiness and he decided to remain behind on island, now named Robinson Crusoe, where they had landed to overhaul the worm-infested vessel.
He cannot have known that it would be five years before he was picked up by an English ship visiting the island.
Published in 1719, Robinson Crusoe is one of the oldest and most famous adventure stories in English literature. Whilst it is unclear whether Defoe and Selkirk actually met, Defoe would certainly have heard the stories of Selkirk's adventure and used the tales as the basis for his novel.
 
I also note that the Smithsonian Institute claims it to be a Chilean Island. I have no argument with you on this issue.
 
 As for Moby Dick, the only source that I consider reputable, the Smithsonian, was the only one I could find, apart from the numerous entries about the book.
 
I'm afraid I can't argue with you on any of the posts so far.Clap


Edited by toyomotor - 10 Jun 2014 at 06:36
"Tá mé bródúil as mo oidhreacht na hÉireann".
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote fantasus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 2014 at 07:55
Are You so sure few people knows Chile? I think many know at least about its existence and approximate location and perhaps a few things more.
And by the time of the story behind Robinson Crusoe there was no chilean state.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Jun 2014 at 08:22
Oh Oh, it's back, Fantasus I mean. 
 
It doesn't matter if a Chilean state didn't actually exist at the time, the source says "Chilean" which I would accept as " What is now called Chile".
 
If all you want to do is nitpick, don't bother.


Edited by toyomotor - 12 Jun 2014 at 02:47
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jun 2014 at 02:42
Originally posted by fantasus fantasus wrote:

Are You so sure few people knows Chile? I think many know at least about its existence and approximate location and perhaps a few things more.
And by the time of the story behind Robinson Crusoe there was no chilean state.


Well, the colonial place called the Kingdom of Chile already existed. It was under Spanish dominion, of course.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jun 2014 at 02:45
Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

Oh Oh, it's back.
 
It doesn't matter if a Chilean state didn't actually exist at the time, the source says "Chilean" which I would accept as " What is now called Chile".
 
If all you want to do is nitpick, don't bother.


Well, in our historical exhibitions, in archaeological museums for instance, we usually talk that Chile is 12.000 old... Because the first remain of people living in Chile is from that time. The independent republic is only 2 centuries old, though, but before there were three centuries under the Spanish Empire and one century under the Inca empire Confused. So, this land is not "brand" new.




Edited by pinguin - 12 Jun 2014 at 02:47
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote toyomotor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jun 2014 at 02:48
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Originally posted by toyomotor toyomotor wrote:

Oh Oh, it's back.
 
It doesn't matter if a Chilean state didn't actually exist at the time, the source says "Chilean" which I would accept as " What is now called Chile".
 
If all you want to do is nitpick, don't bother.


Well, in our historical exhibitions, in archaeological museums for instance, we usually talk that Chile is 12.000 old... Because the first remain of people living in Chile is from that time. The independent republic is only 2 centuries old, though, but before there were three centuries under the Spanish Empire and one century under the Inca empire Confused. So, this land is not "brand" new.

Pinguin, I think Fantasus missed the point you were making.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Jun 2014 at 02:50
By the way, "Chile" doesn't mean chili pepper. It means "cold place", which comes from an Aymara-Quechua word that means cold. Curiously, exactly with the same meaning of "chilly" in English. And it means cold because the Andes valleys in these latitudes reach freezing temperatures.
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