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What to do with lazy messy people?

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Zagros View Drop Down
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Kaveh ye Ahangar

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2012 at 10:47
Originally posted by Dolphin Dolphin wrote:

There is nothing worse than the abject rudeness of a person that asks you (tells you) to take your shoes off before you can be graced by the interior of their house. Seriously, such people don't deserve visitors, especially people who don't do it for cultural reasons.

In all the houses I've been to, lived in, pissed in, not once have I or any other person in the vicinity been poisoned, infected, or otherwise debased by the practice of keeping your shoes on indoors. The notion is ludicrous, and another symptom of the domestos society we're creating in the West. We've got an immune system, get over yourself Wacko

Out of curiosity, come to think of it, what happens when the squeaky clean visits a house with no such policy? Do you keep the shoes on, or shod them at the door?





Spoken like a true slob.  Taking your shoes off, if it's the norm in someone's house is a matter of respect when you enter their personal space for onething, secondly, it's not necessarily that it spreads disease etc.  It's the fact that it makes the place dirtier more quickly because of the detritus that is inherent to the soles of footwear.
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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Zagros View Drop Down
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Kaveh ye Ahangar

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2012 at 10:52

Quote I find Asians (in this part of the world, Asian means Sinic rather than Hindic) to be superbly clean and responsible as a general rule.


Ahh no way - loud, annoying and filthy filthy filthy with no sense of common courstesy.  I had the misfotune of sharing a flat with 3 Chinese students in my second year at uni.  I was thinking bloody murder for the one named Miao (like a cat) in particular.  He refused to use washing up liquid on shared plates because he was admaent it was poisonous which left me having to wash everything before I used it, in the most nightmarish example I had to scrub dried on fish scales from a plate the f**ker had used.

I am by no means what can be classed as a tidiness freak, one look at my room on an average day would confirm this.  But what i will not abide is lack of personal and common hygiene.


Edited by Zagros - 02 Feb 2012 at 10:53
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dolphin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2012 at 13:05
Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:

 

Spoken like a true slob.  Taking your shoes off, if it's the norm in someone's house is a matter of respect when you enter their personal space for onething, secondly, it's not necessarily that it spreads disease etc.  It's the fact that it makes the place dirtier more quickly because of the detritus that is inherent to the soles of footwear.

Ha, a slob? Clap

I never claimed to refuse to take my shoes off if such is the rule, I just find it quite unwelcoming when asked to do so. Maybe that's a cultural thing.

How many public buildings do require you to remove your shoes? Why are private dwellings so different? What's wrong with a mat? Why are people so afraid of icky icky outsidey dirty? Why should I pander to someone who thought it was a good idea to buy cream carpets, then obsesses about them every time a visitor comes to the door? I'm a little too rustic for that nonsense. 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dolphin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2012 at 13:10
I suppose I should say that if I know my shoes are objectively dirty, I will take them off, but I don't have a habit of caking my shoes / runners in dirt of any kind. It is the by-all-intents clean shoe I refer to, the one that probably has some microbes on it, just like your hands do.



 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2012 at 13:50
OK if you don't wear shoes in your house and let people in with shoes then it's a case of detritus clinging to your socks, and travelling all around the house with you, including bed.  Bits of dried leaf for example, or various tree seeds and pine needles.  It's also a bitch to clean up and makes the place ultimately look grotty because of the additional dust coming in.  This gets on my nerves because I don't clean regularly but when it needs to be done and it needs to be done more regularly if shoes are worn. 

Also, I don't like the idea that there is, no doubt, sh*t particles (dog and human) and dried piss (from public toilets) being rubbed into your carpets which also ends up creating a hint of the smell of piss and sh*t which the person who wears his shoes everywhere will not notice because he is used to it.

I like to create mental boundaries in space - the home is one where I dress differently and think differently to public buildings.
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2012 at 15:15
Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:


Quote I find Asians (in this part of the world, Asian means Sinic rather than Hindic) to be superbly clean and responsible as a general rule.


Ahh no way - loud, annoying and filthy filthy filthy with no sense of common courstesy.  I had the misfotune of sharing a flat with 3 Chinese students in my second year at uni.  I was thinking bloody murder for the one named Miao (like a cat) in particular.  He refused to use washing up liquid on shared plates because he was admaent it was poisonous which left me having to wash everything before I used it, in the most nightmarish example I had to scrub dried on fish scales from a plate the f**ker had used.

I am by no means what can be classed as a tidiness freak, one look at my room on an average day would confirm this.  But what i will not abide is lack of personal and common hygiene.
 
Second that completely especially for countryside folk and especially personal hygene. I mean the stink coming from those people especially after long bathroom timeouts makes one vomit.
 
One thing I must give the Indians, they love to shower even if it is filthy water. But what is the use of showering if you don't shave?
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dolphin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2012 at 16:46
My point is that people need a little perspective. I work with coins and notes quite a lot, and after counting 7 tills let me tell you, your hands are filthy. Chances are every time you receive a note from a shop or bar, even a bank, it has traces of faecal matter, blood, urine, or semen on it, in varying degrees. Yet we handle them all the time. Door knobs, railings, seats in public places, counters etc etc are all going to have the same spread of unsavoury matter on them. If you think about it too much you'd wear gloves everywhere. Filth of that sort is a fact of life, especially in urban areas.

If someone has largely wooden and tiled floors and requests you take your shoes off before entering, I kind of don't mind, it's the neurotic with his cream carpets and silk rugs all over the house that gets my goat. Don't have visitors if you want your house to be like a laboratory, and at least be consistent about it. Make people wear gloves inside as well, or keep those damned hands in their dirty pockets. 

Neat freaks are as antisocial as slobs.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dolphin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2012 at 17:04
Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:

OK if you don't wear shoes in your house and let people in with shoes then it's a case of detritus clinging to your socks, and travelling all around the house with you, including bed.  Bits of dried leaf for example, or various tree seeds and pine needles.  It's also a bitch to clean up and makes the place ultimately look grotty because of the additional dust coming in.  This gets on my nerves because I don't clean regularly but when it needs to be done and it needs to be done more regularly if shoes are worn. 

Also, I don't like the idea that there is, no doubt, sh*t particles (dog and human) and dried piss (from public toilets) being rubbed into your carpets which also ends up creating a hint of the smell of piss and sh*t which the person who wears his shoes everywhere will not notice because he is used to it.

I like to create mental boundaries in space - the home is one where I dress differently and think differently to public buildings.

There's nothing I don't agree with there, absolutely, but saying as cleaning is necessary no matter how hard you try to sanitise the place (dead skin in every nook and cranny), the decorum cost should be factored in. I bet if you knew what you've swallowed, snorted, eaten and licked over the years, probably without being aware of it, you'd be disgusted. But that's what immune systems are for. In fact it's healthy to expose your immune system to the odd low level threat, it makes your immune response stronger and makes you less likely to develop sniffles and infections. Asthma is on the rise in urban areas, and people's immune responses are weakening because of this pernicious marketing drive to sanitise our living spaces (BAD germs stalking your children) that has filtered into the 'modern' man's idea of proper living.  

Keeping a house clean is good, thinking you're doing a good thing and keeping it cleaner with a door policy isn't. Smile



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Zagros Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2012 at 20:28
Originally posted by Al Jassas Al Jassas wrote:

Originally posted by Zagros Zagros wrote:


Quote I find Asians (in this part of the world, Asian means Sinic rather than Hindic) to be superbly clean and responsible as a general rule.


Ahh no way - loud, annoying and filthy filthy filthy with no sense of common courstesy.  I had the misfotune of sharing a flat with 3 Chinese students in my second year at uni.  I was thinking bloody murder for the one named Miao (like a cat) in particular.  He refused to use washing up liquid on shared plates because he was admaent it was poisonous which left me having to wash everything before I used it, in the most nightmarish example I had to scrub dried on fish scales from a plate the f**ker had used.

I am by no means what can be classed as a tidiness freak, one look at my room on an average day would confirm this.  But what i will not abide is lack of personal and common hygiene.
 
Second that completely especially for countryside folk and especially personal hygene. I mean the stink coming from those people especially after long bathroom timeouts makes one vomit.
 
One thing I must give the Indians, they love to shower even if it is filthy water. But what is the use of showering if you don't shave?
 
Al-Jassas


Man Indian FOBs STINK.  When I have to get the piccadilly line coming in from West London in the morning and almost every carriage smells like sewage from the mix of stale spice and BO.  I don't know if it is their clothes they don't wash or whether they don't shower often enough or both, but IT IS BAD.

This is Miao on the right by the way.  I still get the rage looking at the bastard.  The guy on the left wasn't too bad, but I once walked in on him in the dining room getting brainwashed by Jehova's Witnesses.



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Edited by Zagros - 02 Feb 2012 at 20:34
"There was glory in pissing, Corabb decided as he watched the stream curve out and make that familiar but unique sound as it hit the ground." So true.
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