| FORUM | ARCHIVE |                    | TOTAL QUIZ RESULT |


  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Which language can you speak?(Except English)
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login


Welcome stranger, click here to read about some of the great benefits of registering for a free account with us and joining us in our global online community.


Which language can you speak?(Except English)

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123>
Poll Question: Which language can you speak?(Except English)
Poll Choice Votes Poll Statistics
6 [9.09%]
10 [15.15%]
13 [19.70%]
5 [7.58%]
5 [7.58%]
2 [3.03%]
2 [3.03%]
2 [3.03%]
6 [9.09%]
7 [10.61%]
3 [4.55%]
5 [7.58%]
You can not vote in this poll

Author
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2010 at 21:50
Spanish
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Anton View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar


Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 3326
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Anton Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 10:56

Bulgarian and Russian are my native languages.  And I used to speak Swedish quite well. Now I can use it only when I am exceptionally drunk. Learned Latin at school but even alcohol doesn't help with this one.

Back to Top
WolfHound85 View Drop Down
Knight
Knight
Avatar

Joined: 02 Sep 2008
Location: USA and Poland
Status: Offline
Points: 65
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WolfHound85 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2010 at 15:46
French and basic Polish.
College Student
Back to Top
Cywr View Drop Down
King
King


Joined: 04 Aug 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 6075
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cywr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2012 at 05:44
Dutch, but sluggish from lack of use.
Basic German.

Trying to teach myself Indonesian (seriously this time, not just to order food :p)
Back to Top
The Hidden Face View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke


Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 1590
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Hidden Face Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2012 at 11:42
Turkish and some Hungarian.
Back to Top
Paradigm of Humanity View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 18 Oct 2011
Location: Konstantiniyye
Status: Offline
Points: 919
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paradigm of Humanity Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2012 at 11:49
Seriously, what kind of poll is this? I'm able to vote twice for Turkish. So, how could I know if someone spammed 11 votes for German? Thumbs Down

Edited by Paradigm of Humanity - 16 Jun 2012 at 11:50
Back to Top
The Hidden Face View Drop Down
Arch Duke
Arch Duke


Joined: 16 Jul 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 1590
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Hidden Face Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2012 at 11:57
Because we are cool guys and none of us do such a lame thing, PoH. Thumbs Up
Back to Top
okamido View Drop Down
Samurai
Samurai
Avatar

Joined: 11 Nov 2009
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 115
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote okamido Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2012 at 14:40
Can't pick multiple options apparently. I speak French, Spanish, and Tagalog.
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2012 at 15:57
I am native Spanish speaker, and writer in Spanish. I can communicate in English, but I'll never reach perfection, I know. I have also tried (and failed miserable) to learn German, Portuguese, Japanese, French and Chinese... and some Mapudungun (native Mapuche).

Edited by pinguin - 16 Jun 2012 at 15:58
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jun 2012 at 00:16
French and German (but not Lëtzebuergesch Unhappy) on a daily basis and the army taught me Russian many years ago but I've hardly ever used it since so it's very rusty.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jun 2012 at 01:01
I only know 4 other languages other than Emglish because I used them when I was young. I am a hala khan so I know manchu, I lived in Manchukuo as a puppet state so I learned Japanese, in traditional manchu rituals, it is common for there to be mongolian so I know a little mongol, and my native language is Mandarin (but in a more central dialect)
PS: pinguin, what dialect of Chinese did you try to learn?
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jun 2012 at 13:13
Originally posted by Lao Tse Lao Tse wrote:


PS: pinguin, what dialect of Chinese did you try to learn?


I tried to learn Mandarin. I am fascinated with Chinese script. And, although for me is a very difficult task, I manage to learn some of them. I am fascinated when I recognize some of them in Chinese texts. But I am very far from mastering it at all.


Edited by pinguin - 24 Jun 2012 at 13:14
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jun 2012 at 13:33
Mandarin is very complicated, many people in China cannot master the entire language. For example, I learned the Art of calligraphy in San Francisco. It is extremely complicated and it takes atleast 20 years to learn your own technique.
Back to Top
Buckskins View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2012
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 792
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Buckskins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Jun 2012 at 07:10
Hola Penguino, Korean is much easier. It used to be near as complicated as Mandarin, but not now. A Korean Emperor felt sorry for the people and wrote out a new alphabet.
May you live as long as you want to,
and may you want to as long as you live.
Back to Top
Buckskins View Drop Down
General
General
Avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2012
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 792
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Buckskins Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Jun 2012 at 07:16

American/English. Tex/Mex.   A rough working knowledge of German, Greek, Spanish with the lisp, and some Latin.
May you live as long as you want to,
and may you want to as long as you live.
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Jun 2012 at 09:50
I'm learning Korean, It is a little more simple to me because still several characters are the same as in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. One problem is their pinyin, and pronounciation, very hard to seperate Japanese from chinese and chinese from Korean.
Back to Top
lirelou View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar

Joined: 26 Mar 2009
Location: Tampa, FL
Status: Offline
Points: 1346
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lirelou Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Jul 2012 at 15:41
Lao Tse, Korean is written in Hangul, an alphabet. The old Hanjin/Hanju (?) can still be occasionally seen, and at one time both Korean High School and College graduates had a Chinese character base ranging from several hundred to several thousand characters. According to my work-mate of several years ago, deciphering the meaning of some Korean names was far simpler using the old Chinese characters, because there are no homonyms in the writing system that can confuse meanings. I had seven years experience reading place names in Hangul, but have lost some of it.
 
I was born into an English speaking family, spent some time in Franco-American institutions and neighborhoods, and did my university studies in Spanish and have worked in French and Spanish language required postings. I also passed an Armed Forces competency exam in Dutch (Afrikaans) in 1971, in Portuguese in 1988, and have an intermediate capability in Vietnamese (Southern dialect) and once had a very basic capability in Rhade, a malayo-polynesian language. I took Chinese Mandarin and Arabic night courses for a few months of my life in the 70s, and can at least get around as a tourist in Taiwan, Hong Kong and Shanghai carrying my trusty Lonely Planet so as to practice my phrases before stepping on the bus, etc..  
 
 
Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá gì
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Jul 2012 at 18:31
I know every country has a different way of calling it, but it is basically pinyin. When I worked as a translator for several companies, it was easier to translate the characters into pinyin first, then the pinyin to english. I had to do this for many people who wanted to know how to pronounce the words that I wrote. I still occasionally find clients who want things translated to Korean from Chinese characters. So the easiest way for me to do so is first, translate characters to pinyin, then english, then the Korean form of pinyin, then Korean characters. I have had to do this with many scripts, even the Cao system, which is chinese cursive, and both Zhuan systems, chinese seal/ pictograms in many cases.
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2012 at 11:57
Originally posted by Buckskins Buckskins wrote:

Hola Penguino, Korean is much easier. It used to be near as complicated as Mandarin, but not now. A Korean Emperor felt sorry for the people and wrote out a new alphabet.


Absolutely. But Chinese is the language that called my attention. In fact, I was more interested in Chinese writing, than in the language itself. I am fascinated with scripts, and the Chinese script is very elegant. I still can get a grasp of what  say the logos of Chinese restaurants.



For instance, in the add above, the first character means the number 3, the second I have no idea Confused... But the third and fourth mean restaurant.

The third character has the radical of water and is an stylized drawing of a bottle, which means, sort of rice wine. The fourth is a pig under a roof, which means a place where you can eat meat. In other terms: it is a "meat and wine" place.

If I made same mistake, please correct me.

But the fascinating of Chinese script is that is not phonetic but ideographic. It is a way to codify ideas. I don't think is much practical, but it is still very beautiful.







Back to Top
Cywr View Drop Down
King
King


Joined: 04 Aug 2004
Status: Offline
Points: 6075
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cywr Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 00:50
Hmm isn't Korean script syllabic, rather than alphabetic?

Makes it more like Brahmic scripts that way.
Back to Top
Ko-Chosen View Drop Down
Housecarl
Housecarl
Avatar

Joined: 15 Jul 2012
Location: Hungary
Status: Offline
Points: 39
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ko-Chosen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 01:17
I speak Hungarian (Native), English, German and Classical Latin.
I know like 100 words in Arabic, but can't read Arabic.
I can read Hebrew, but can't really understand it.
博麗 霊夢 - Hakurei Reimu

Back to Top
Sarmat View Drop Down
Tsar
Tsar
Avatar

Joined: 01 Jun 2007
Status: Offline
Points: 4303
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Sarmat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 02:47
Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Originally posted by Buckskins Buckskins wrote:

Hola Penguino, Korean is much easier. It used to be near as complicated as Mandarin, but not now. A Korean Emperor felt sorry for the people and wrote out a new alphabet.


Absolutely. But Chinese is the language that called my attention. In fact, I was more interested in Chinese writing, than in the language itself. I am fascinated with scripts, and the Chinese script is very elegant. I still can get a grasp of what  say the logos of Chinese restaurants.



For instance, in the add above, the first character means the number 3, the second I have no idea Confused... But the third and fourth mean restaurant.

The third character has the radical of water and is an stylized drawing of a bottle, which means, sort of rice wine. The fourth is a pig under a roof, which means a place where you can eat meat. In other terms: it is a "meat and wine" place.

If I made same mistake, please correct me.

But the fascinating of Chinese script is that is not phonetic but ideographic. It is a way to codify ideas. I don't think is much practical, but it is still very beautiful.

 
The second character "he" is very important and has many meaning. It's is particular important for Chinese philosophy, BTW. The most common meaning is unite, bringing together, etc.
 
Third character means "wine", the fourth is actually "home" or "house." But the third and fourth together indeed mean restaurant, although the literal translation would be a "wine house."
 
What the 1st an 2nd character together mean is something like: "three coming together" or "three unite together," which I believe is a reference to Taoist concept of the union of three: Heavens, Earth and Man, which basically mean the union of harmonius cosmos or universe. But san he 三合 can also have other meanings depending on a context...
 
Kind of poetic name for a restaurant.
 
In terms of practicability, Chinese characters are actually very practical and handy for the Chinese itself and fit the language structure very well. The different story are Japanese and Korean that gramatically do not fit Chinese characters well and that was the main reason behind the invention of the native Japanese and Korean alphabets.


Edited by Sarmat - 16 Jul 2012 at 02:49
Σαρμάτ

Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 05:39
Originally posted by Sarmat Sarmat wrote:

Originally posted by pinguin pinguin wrote:

Originally posted by Buckskins Buckskins wrote:

Hola Penguino, Korean is much easier. It used to be near as complicated as Mandarin, but not now. A Korean Emperor felt sorry for the people and wrote out a new alphabet.


Absolutely. But Chinese is the language that called my attention. In fact, I was more interested in Chinese writing, than in the language itself. I am fascinated with scripts, and the Chinese script is very elegant. I still can get a grasp of what  say the logos of Chinese restaurants.



For instance, in the add above, the first character means the number 3, the second I have no idea Confused... But the third and fourth mean restaurant.

The third character has the radical of water and is an stylized drawing of a bottle, which means, sort of rice wine. The fourth is a pig under a roof, which means a place where you can eat meat. In other terms: it is a "meat and wine" place.

If I made same mistake, please correct me.

But the fascinating of Chinese script is that is not phonetic but ideographic. It is a way to codify ideas. I don't think is much practical, but it is still very beautiful.

 
The second character "he" is very important and has many meaning. It's is particular important for Chinese philosophy, BTW. The most common meaning is unite, bringing together, etc.
 
Third character means "wine", the fourth is actually "home" or "house." But the third and fourth together indeed mean restaurant, although the literal translation would be a "wine house."
 
What the 1st an 2nd character together mean is something like: "three coming together" or "three unite together," which I believe is a reference to Taoist concept of the union of three: Heavens, Earth and Man, which basically mean the union of harmonius cosmos or universe. But san he 三合 can also have other meanings depending on a context...
 
Kind of poetic name for a restaurant.
 
In terms of practicability, Chinese characters are actually very practical and handy for the Chinese itself and fit the language structure very well. The different story are Japanese and Korean that gramatically do not fit Chinese characters well and that was the main reason behind the invention of the native Japanese and Korean alphabets.
That is true, Sarmat, and Pinguin, which of the 9 scripts do you mean??? The sign is in the Li shu meaning that it is of the clerical script. This script has only been used in recent times as decorations, sign postings, and occasionally the calligraphic value returns. The 9 scripts (as called in pinyin) are: Jiaguwen (Xia-Shang Periods), Jin Wen (Zhou- Warring States Periods), Da Zhuan shu(Qin period), Xin Zhuan shu (Qin Period), Li shu(Han- Wei Periods), Cao shu (Han-Current), Xing shu(Han- Current), and
Kai shu(Wei- Current), and what I call Xin Kai shu (1958- Current). 
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 05:54
I can see why the Joint Services School didn't have a Chinese course for conscripts. Smile  It was only for regulars.
Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
Al Jassas View Drop Down
King
King


Joined: 08 Aug 2007
Status: Offline
Points: 5000
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Al Jassas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 06:20
Originally posted by Ko-Chosen Ko-Chosen wrote:

I speak Hungarian (Native), English, German and Classical Latin.
I know like 100 words in Arabic, but can't read Arabic.
I can read Hebrew, but can't really understand it.
 
The Arabic alphabet isn't that hard. Plus it gives you the opportunity to read Persian a good deal of which is understandable for me.
 
 
Al-Jassas
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 06:44
I can speak basic Russian and I understand the alphabet but I still have a hard time reading it, I am also working on Latin
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 07:31
Ich spreche Deutsch

hablo espanol

Je parle le français

et Latin

Of course, all on a basic level. Some trouble at times with the structures of sentences.

Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 20:02
Originally posted by Panther Panther wrote:

Ich spreche Deutsch

hablo espanol

Je parle le français

et Latin

Of course, all on a basic level. Some trouble at times with the structures of sentences.

Wo xiu shuo dewen, zhi wo shuo yixie ladingwen.
I  don't  speak german, but I speak a little latin.
My favorite saying in latin: Illegitimate non carborundum.
 
Panther, could you translate? ( I think I mispelled carborundum)
Back to Top
pinguin View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar

Joined: 29 Sep 2006
Status: Offline
Points: 15238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pinguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2012 at 22:19
Originally posted by Sarmat Sarmat wrote:

Originally posted by Pinguin Pinguin wrote:




For instance, in the add above, the first character means the number 3, the second I have no idea Confused... But the third and fourth mean restaurant.

The third character has the radical of water and is an stylized drawing of a bottle, which means, sort of rice wine. The fourth is a pig under a roof, which means a place where you can eat meat. In other terms: it is a "meat and wine" place.

If I made same mistake, please correct me.

But the fascinating of Chinese script is that is not phonetic but ideographic. It is a way to codify ideas. I don't think is much practical, but it is still very beautiful.

 
The second character "he" is very important and has many meaning. It's is particular important for Chinese philosophy, BTW. The most common meaning is unite, bringing together, etc.
 
Third character means "wine", the fourth is actually "home" or "house." But the third and fourth together indeed mean restaurant, although the literal translation would be a "wine house."
 
What the 1st an 2nd character together mean is something like: "three coming together" or "three unite together," which I believe is a reference to Taoist concept of the union of three: Heavens, Earth and Man, which basically mean the union of harmonius cosmos or universe. But san he 三合 can also have other meanings depending on a context...
 
Kind of poetic name for a restaurant.
 


Indeed. Chinese script is surprising because those associations. And Taoism is a central part in chinese culture. Still, Chinese script is extremely difficult to learn in comparison to an alphabet (western languages, Hindu, Hebrew, Arab) or syllabus (Korean, Japanese), so I am afraid in the very long term will be replaced by pinyin, or something equivalent.





Edited by pinguin - 16 Jul 2012 at 22:23
Back to Top
gcle2003 View Drop Down
WorldHistoria Master
WorldHistoria Master
Avatar
PM Honorary Member

Joined: 06 Dec 2004
Location: Luxembourg
Status: Offline
Points: 13238
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gcle2003 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2012 at 02:34
Originally posted by Lao Tse Lao Tse wrote:

 
My favorite saying in latin: Illegitimate non carborundum.
 
Panther, could you translate? ( I think I mispelled carborundum)

It looks like Latin, it sounds like Latin, but is not in fact Latin. 'Illegitimus' does mean 'unlawful' and 'non' means 'no' but carborundum is not a Latin word at all, it's a trademark for an abrasive.

Citizen of Ankh-Morpork.

Never believe anything until it has been officially denied - Sir Humphrey Appleby, 1984.

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <123>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.