| FORUM | ARCHIVE |                    | TOTAL QUIZ RESULT |


  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - WW2 Autobographies
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login


Welcome stranger, click here to read about some of the great benefits of registering for a free account with us and joining us in our global online community.


WW2 Autobographies

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
4ZZZ View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: WW2 Autobographies
    Posted: 19 Apr 2010 at 08:44
I have just finished the novel The Thin Red Line by James Joones and must say that it was an enthralling read. But in the end it was "just" a novel and had me wondering as to the realism of the book. I am now interested in reading some gritty autobiographical works from WW2. This is not an area that I have tended to read and any recommendations would be useful. I am not interested in the more famous individuals but say those of the front line soldiers.  

Thanks.    
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
xristar View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain


Joined: 05 Nov 2005
Status: Offline
Points: 1151
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote xristar Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Apr 2010 at 11:02
The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer It's one of the best I believe. The author, Guy Sajer, born in Alcace had a French father and an Alcatian-German mother. Being half-German he was drafted into the German army at the age of 17. He eventually joined the Grossdeutshland division. His story is very fascinating, perhaps too much, making some believe it's partially fake.
Anyway, it's the best of the WWII soliders' books I've personally read.
Is there any thing whereof it may be said, See, this is new?
it hath been already of old time, which was before us.
-Ecclesiastes
Back to Top
4ZZZ View Drop Down
Knight
Knight


Joined: 02 Nov 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 81
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Apr 2010 at 13:59
Thank you. That is just what I am looking for. Other recommendation's will be gratefully excepted.    
Back to Top
lirelou View Drop Down
Chieftain
Chieftain
Avatar

Joined: 26 Mar 2009
Location: Tampa, FL
Status: Offline
Points: 1346
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lirelou Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Apr 2010 at 19:24
Well, since 'The Pacific' is now on HBO, why not E.B. Sledge's "With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa", or Robert Lekke's "A Helmet for my pillow" two combat Marines views of those campaigns. For the European Campaign, Charles MacDOnald's "Company Commander" might be of interest. For an Australian view, written as a fictionalized memoire, Peter Pinney's "Signaller Johnston's Secret War", which is actually three novels previously published grouped into one. Pinney served with the Australian Commandos (titled Independent Companies) on New Guinea and Papua, and his writing is superb, though some of the slang will perplex non-Aussie readers. He does include glossaries, but common Aussue terms like "whiteant" are presumed to be understandable to all.
Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá gì
Back to Top
Birddog View Drop Down
Consul
Consul
Avatar

Joined: 23 Aug 2009
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 386
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Birddog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Apr 2010 at 23:37
Hey lirelou. I've read 'The Barbarians' and 'The Glass Cannon', by Pinney. (Both are very old paper backs in my local library). What's the title of the third book in the trilogy?
4ZZZ. Another good Australian personal history from WW2 is "Not as a duty only : an infantryman's war" by Henry "Jo' Gullett. Jo was one of the first men to enlist in the 6th AIF Division in WW2. (They 6th was our senior AIF Division. Divisions 1-5 AIF were formed during WW1 and when WW2 started were milita divisions. Australians just kept counting up!) After introducing his Battalion and Platoon he starts with the harrowing account of his platoon's assult on Post 11 during the Battle of Bardia Jan 1941. If you believe Italians couldn't fight! Well Jo and his mates hit the hard bit. After loseing 9/10 of his platoon and recovering from his many wounds he tells of the Greek Campagin (where his company never fired a shot, but the battalion lost over half it's men), reforming the division in the middle east, returning to Australia, and campagins in New Guinea and getting wounded again. In the final part of his war history Jo was sent to UK as a observer but got himself attached to a British Infantry Battalion for D-Day and fought in the bloody battles around Carn. When the British Battalion was shot to pieces and sent to the rear to reform he tagged himself onto a Scotish Battalion and got himself wounded a third time leading a Scotish Company on an assult on a german held village.  
It's a hard book to get your hands on but well worth the read.
Back to Top
Birddog View Drop Down
Consul
Consul
Avatar

Joined: 23 Aug 2009
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 386
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Birddog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 Apr 2010 at 23:51
http://cas.awm.gov.au/item/ART27576
In relation to my last post, there is a painting of Jo at Post 11. Jo is the soldier being dragged by the other soldiers. It's not a pretty picture.
Back to Top
4ZZZ View Drop Down
Knight
Knight


Joined: 02 Nov 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 81
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Apr 2010 at 01:23
Originally posted by lirelou lirelou wrote:

Well, since 'The Pacific' is now on HBO, why not E.B. Sledge's "With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa", or Robert Lekke's "A Helmet for my pillow" two combat Marines views of those campaigns. For the European Campaign, Charles MacDOnald's "Company Commander" might be of interest. For an Australian view, written as a fictionalized memoire, Peter Pinney's "Signaller Johnston's Secret War", which is actually three novels previously published grouped into one. Pinney served with the Australian Commandos (titled Independent Companies) on New Guinea and Papua, and his writing is superb, though some of the slang will perplex non-Aussie readers. He does include glossaries, but common Aussue terms like "whiteant" are presumed to be understandable to all.


Thanks. I am actually live in Brisbane Australia so Aussie slang is the least of my worriesSmile.

The Pacific started a couple of weeks back and has so far been impressive. I will be grabbing both of the related bios. Charles MacDonald's "Company Commander" is readily available.

Pinneys book is another matter. This is out of print and hard to find. It is not even in the Qld State Library and that I find odd considering that it was published by The University of QLD Press. I have found a copy in a used book shop in Melbourne and will be grabbing that soon. This has had a fair few positive write up locally.  Thanks for the heads up.
Back to Top
4ZZZ View Drop Down
Knight
Knight


Joined: 02 Nov 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 81
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Apr 2010 at 01:30
Originally posted by Birddog Birddog wrote:

Hey lirelou. I've read 'The Barbarians' and 'The Glass Cannon', by Pinney. (Both are very old paper backs in my local library). What's the title of the third book in the trilogy?
4ZZZ. Another good Australian personal history from WW2 is "Not as a duty only : an infantryman's war" by Henry "Jo' Gullett. Jo was one of the first men to enlist in the 6th AIF Division in WW2. (They 6th was our senior AIF Division. Divisions 1-5 AIF were formed during WW1 and when WW2 started were milita divisions. Australians just kept counting up!) After introducing his Battalion and Platoon he starts with the harrowing account of his platoon's assult on Post 11 during the Battle of Bardia Jan 1941. If you believe Italians couldn't fight! Well Jo and his mates hit the hard bit. After loseing 9/10 of his platoon and recovering from his many wounds he tells of the Greek Campagin (where his company never fired a shot, but the battalion lost over half it's men), reforming the division in the middle east, returning to Australia, and campagins in New Guinea and getting wounded again. In the final part of his war history Jo was sent to UK as a observer but got himself attached to a British Infantry Battalion for D-Day and fought in the bloody battles around Carn. When the British Battalion was shot to pieces and sent to the rear to reform he tagged himself onto a Scotish Battalion and got himself wounded a third time leading a Scotish Company on an assult on a german held village.  
It's a hard book to get your hands on but well worth the read.


Thanks Birddog. I will be looking out for that.

I was given a copy of a book called Mates And Memories by Dr Bob Goodwin. Not so much a bio but a record of the 2/10 Field Regiment. The 2/10 Field Regiment actually published the book. A nice read if you can find it.


Back to Top
lirelou View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote lirelou Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Apr 2010 at 01:47
Birddog, The Devil's Garden. A mate from Brizzy sent me the Signaller Johnston paperback (UQ Press) back in 2004 or so. Hey, three great books for the price of one.
Back to Top
4ZZZ View Drop Down
Knight
Knight


Joined: 02 Nov 2008
Status: Offline
Points: 81
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote 4ZZZ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Sep 2010 at 08:26
Originally posted by xristar xristar wrote:

The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer It's one of the best I believe. The author, Guy Sajer, born in Alcace had a French father and an Alcatian-German mother. Being half-German he was drafted into the German army at the age of 17. He eventually joined the Grossdeutshland division. His story is very fascinating, perhaps too much, making some believe it's partially fake.
Anyway, it's the best of the WWII soliders' books I've personally read.


Finished this book a few weeks back and agree that his story was a fascinating read. There was, for the reader, not many peacfull moments let alone Guy Sajer. I have read some of the debate as to the authenticity of the story and side with the believers to a degree. His point made later in his life that he was not an historian but telling his tale as he remembered it makes sense to my aging mind. I struggle with last week let alone 40 years back Smile.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Quick Reply
Name:

Message:
   NoFollow is applied to all links from this forum
 Enable BBcodes
Security Code:
Code Image - Please contact webmaster if you have problems seeing this image code  Refresh Refresh Image
Powered by Web Wiz CAPTCHA version 4.04 wwf
Copyright ©2005-2013 Web Wiz
Please enter the Security Code exactly as shown in image format.
Cookies must be enabled on your web browser.

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.10
Copyright ©2001-2017 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.093 seconds.