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Your local traditional architecture?

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    Posted: 13 Jul 2009 at 19:22
 
What kind of traditional architecture do you have at your place?

Here in southwestern part of Sweden we have among other some old churches. Christianity gained influence in these parts of our country in the 11th and 12th centuries. Then also churches were built, first in wood and son thereafter in stone. Every little municipality on the countryside have a little church. Here is a couple of examples:

The church of Granhult in the province of Smauland. It is the oldest preserved church of wood in Sweden, built around 1220.
 
 
 
Most of our chuches are built in stone, here is one typical country church with roots in the middle ages:
 
 
 
 An old classic way of building here in Sweden is with logs. This way found its way to America with the colonists of New Sweden and spread in the form of the classic log cabin.
 
We have a couple of really old log cabins, among them this one up in the province of Dalarna. It is dated to around 1285:
 
 

A classical small scale farm house from the 18th or 19th century. This kind of houses are an important part of Swedens image of itself and they are extremely popular as summer houses today:

 
 
 
 


Edited by Carcharodon - 30 Nov 2011 at 10:05
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Jul 2009 at 15:38
Also the Sami people up in northern Sweden has their own traditional archtecture.
 
This is a Kata, a traditional Sami dwelling. Most Samis does not live in these kinds of dwellings anymore. Some can have them as summerhouses though:
 
 
Here is another kind of Kata:
 
Photo: Bertil Thelin, Ajtte 2000.
 
Here is a building for storing things, a so called Njalla:
 
Pic from:
 
 


Edited by Carcharodon - 30 Nov 2011 at 10:08
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chookie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Jul 2009 at 22:46
I'm not too happy with calling it "local traditional architecture". I think I'd prefer to say vernacular architecture.

In Scotland, the only region I can discuss in the "traditional architecture" stream, we have a couple of very different approaches. In the Gaeltachd (basically the Western Isles and the Western Highlands), environmental considerations pretty much required the development of the "black house":-



On the East coast the environmental considerations were very different. What sets the architecture of the Scottish East coast apart from the west is, in the main, the craw-stepped gable.

The craw-stepped gable is a common architectural device in the Low Countries, the Baltic, Scandinavia and the eastern coast of Britain. In the Netherlands it's referred to as trapgevel.

This is an example from North-east Scotland:-


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Since I read this post, almost a day ago, I was thinking about what is the "Traditional" architecture of my country. Actually, it is impossible to define here traditional because there is not a single tradition but many. Besides, there are many stiles used in the past that aren't in use anymore.

These are some of our "traditions".

Mapuche natives ruca (house)

Is a wooden building of eliptical section, covered by straws. It has a design with opennings that works as chimeneys.
 
Ruca from the 19th century:

Contemporary replicas

 

 
Northern Indigenous-Colonial architecture of the Aymara zone. The origin is prehispanic, but theirs more important buildings today are churches. The basic materials are mud bricks.
 
 
Mud brick town
San Pedro de Atacama Chile (4)
 
Central zone country side colonial houses. The main characteristic are the red tiles and the passways.
 
 
 A modern version of the classic house
 
 
 
 
Ancient (17th and 18th century) buildings in Santiago
 
 
 
Valparaiso, port
 
Southern Zone traditional architecture
 
Modern Version
 
 
Easter Island's boat houses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Edited by pinguin - 15 Jul 2009 at 04:19
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 11:00
Thank you for your contributions. Very interesting. The craw stepped gable is called trappstegsgavel in Swedish. Here is one famous Swedish example of that (eventhough this house was built in the time when the Danish ruled Scania, our most southern province):
 
Glimmingehus in Scania
 
 
In Sweden we also have old city architecture. Many of our towns had in old days rather small wooden houses, here is an example from Gothenburg:
 
From Gatenhielmska in Gothenburg
 
Later there were a lot of houses in stone, like these:
 
Linnegatan in Gothenburg


Edited by Carcharodon - 15 Jul 2009 at 11:39
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 12:06
Ok, i won't speak about the local traditional architecture of Athens (cause nothing is left), but i will rather post some pics from my homelands and the area i have my summerplace.

The pictures below are from Chalkidiki (My summerplace), central Macedonia perfecture and are typical for the region.











The pictures below are from Boion (my homeland) and surroundings, south-west Macedonia perfecture and are typical for the region.





















Edited by Flipper - 16 Jul 2009 at 14:27
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 12:08
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

 
Glimmingehus in Scania
 


It's been many years i visited that one. Isn't it a ghost story behind it?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Act of Oblivion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2009 at 22:03
...sadly, a dying traditonal architecture in England....Cry

 
 
 

 

 

 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 08:23
Act of Oblivion are those pics from Colchester?

Edited by Flipper - 16 Jul 2009 at 08:23
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 09:02
Originally posted by Flipper Flipper wrote:

 
It's been many years i visited that one. Isn't it a ghost story behind it?
 
Yes, it is said that spirits of both animals and people are haunting the place. There are said to be spirits of black rats (a species which is extinct in Sweden), a big hen with chickens, and a ferocious  big dog. The dog is said to be the ghost of a castle lord who sometimes turns into an animal.
Three tranclucent ladys from the 18th century and a cart drawn be six horses are also to be seen.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 09:24
Sweden is definitely a ghost hunters paradise Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 13:09
Hey, guys think about whether you have permission to "borrow" a pic before placing it in the forum...otherwise, the result will be all those big blank pages! Besides, with the current ballyhoo with Cyrus we ourselves must have "clean" hands and be more pure than Caesar's wife.
By the way, Carch, when did Bell Epoque architecture become Swedish traditional? That last pic you put up could be any street corner of a major European (and even American) city in 1900!?!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 13:48
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Hey, guys think about whether you have permission to "borrow" a pic before placing it in the forum...otherwise, the result will be all those big blank pages! Besides, with the current ballyhoo with Cyrus we ourselves must have "clean" hands and be more pure than Caesar's wife.
By the way, Carch, when did Bell Epoque architecture become Swedish traditional? That last pic you put up could be any street corner of a major European (and even American) city in 1900!?!
 
The pic is more of an illustration of some of the changes in Swedish cities from small scale wooden houses to larger scale stone architecture. I did not say that those stone houses were especially traditional.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 14:03
Well, they are not "houses" either but typical examples of an European urban landscape, post 1850...the Parisian "wedding cake" decor complete with mansard roof is classic Second Empire fru-fru.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 14:09
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Well, they are not "houses" either but typical examples of an European urban landscape, post 1850...the Parisian "wedding cake" decor complete with mansard roof is classic Second Empire fru-fru.
 
Still a house is a house, even if one can have a lot of specialized names of every type. But if you prefer the word buildings it is okay too.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 14:26
We're talking about architecture here so houses, buildings, arcs or whatever are welcome i guess.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 18:32
Hey, I thought the theme was "Traditional" and not examples of "international" styles. As we all know, Swiss "chalets" or Victorian "gingerbreads" had a nasty habit of popping up all over the globe--and they still do--and the wealthy have had a long habit of setting up shop with some rather repetitive recreation of what was "in" among the powers-and-shakers. For example, Flipper, you posted some pictures of Chalkidiki that could pass for many a small town in Andalusia! And that cream colored Neo-Classic building echos structures put up everywhere by those claiming "Enlightenment". Calling it "traditional" is a bit of a stretch.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 18:52
Well, sometimes architecture that originates in, and is traditional to, one place has a tendency to pop up in other places because people move around. A good example is the Nordic style log cabins that spread to North America with Finnish and Swedish immigrants to the colony New Sweden. The building technique was soon taken up by Lenapes and Susquehannocks and it also spread to the Dutch and to the English, and so on. Today there are probably many people who believe that these log cabins are examples of traditional American frontiers architecture and that it descends from there.
 
Log cabin in New Sweden
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 19:31
Nevertheless, the log cabin is a traditional structure in that it is representative of a common functional structure meant to resolve housing needs premised on the availability of local materials. For example, a thatched roof cottage in Stratford is traditional while a Palladian style estate nearby can not be called such. Along the shores of the Mediterranean you can easily distinguish the homestead set up in the traditional style descending from the earliest of times in both the urban and rural settings, and therein you can also witness other structures whose appearance stand as evidence of external influences. Would you call Stockholm an example of traditional Swedish urban architecture--or Saint Petersburg in Russia for that matter?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Flipper Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 20:17
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

For example, Flipper, you posted some pictures of Chalkidiki that could pass for many a small town in Andalusia! And that cream colored Neo-Classic building echos structures put up everywhere by those claiming "Enlightenment". Calling it "traditional" is a bit of a stretch.


Ofcourse it is possible to see similarities between regions, especially if we consider material and climate as a major factor. In Spain, Greece and other places of the medi you äre supposed to find common architecture. I remember myself a pic from the streets of the old town of Kalamata where you would not easily tell if it is Greece or the Caribean.

The pics from Chalkidiki are local architecture (no matter the similarity) and in the specific region there's a law to maintain it when you build new houses. The reason why people build such houses is because the specific stone material which gives confortable temperatures in both summer and winter of the southern Chalkidiki microclima. I guess similar logic was maintained in Spain.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 20:33
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Would you call Stockholm an example of traditional Swedish urban architecture--or Saint Petersburg in Russia for that matter?
 
There exists both old traditional wooden buildings in Stockholm and early 20th century style stone buildings and modern, international style high rises.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Act of Oblivion Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 20:36
Originally posted by Flipper Flipper wrote:

Act of Oblivion are those pics from Colchester?
 
..to be honest, i cannot be sure...i did want to post some pictures of pubs local to me, but most images were either unsuitable or too large to upload....to be fair, i was jesting and it was more a wee comment on a declining tradition than in a strictly architectural sense...ours pubs can be pretty much made in any style but it is the older, mainly country pubs i suppose that i pine for....
 
...all the best...AoO...


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 20:53
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Would you call Stockholm an example of traditional Swedish urban architecture--or Saint Petersburg in Russia for that matter?
 
There exists both old traditional wooden buildings in Stockholm and early 20th century style stone buildings and modern, international style high rises.
 
Funny, I do believe that Staden was more or less laid waste in the great fire of 1697...and a few more thereafter with most "wood" construction really dating from the decades prior to 1911 as reconstruction to coincide with the completion of King Oscar's palace in 1901Approve
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Styrbiorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 21:01
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

 
Funny, I do believe that Staden was more or less laid waste in the great fire of 1697...and a few more thereafter with most "wood" construction really dating from the decades prior to 1911 as reconstruction to coincide with the completion of King Oscar's palace in 1901Approve

It was only the castle that was laid waste in the fire though.


Edited by Styrbiorn - 16 Jul 2009 at 21:12
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote eaglecap Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2009 at 22:38
Americana, Spanish with a mix of old and new but I live in a smalltown so there is not a whole lot here. I love Santa Barbara, California with its Spanish architecture and view of the Pacific Oceans and the Santa Barbara Islands- similar to the Greek Islands but wilder. I will search for some images later.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Seko- Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2009 at 17:27
The Mission in Santa Barbara has the look you like.


Something closer to home, Fort Mackinac
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Cryptic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jul 2009 at 15:42
Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Here in southwestern part of Sweden we have among other some old churches. Christianity gained influence in these parts of our country in the 11th and 12th centuries.   
Architecture aside, I had no idea that it took Christianity that long to become the dominate religion in Scandanavia.  I had thought that the only late pagan hold out was Lithuania.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drgonzaga Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jul 2009 at 21:14
Originally posted by Cryptic Cryptic wrote:

Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Here in southwestern part of Sweden we have among other some old churches. Christianity gained influence in these parts of our country in the 11th and 12th centuries.   
Architecture aside, I had no idea that it took Christianity that long to become the dominate religion in Scandanavia.  I had thought that the only late pagan hold out was Lithuania.
 
Well Cryptic, it all depends upon how one defines time and place. The Knuds (Canutes) of Denmark were most certainly Christians and one can speak of major influence by the time of Olav Tryggvason and restrict the consolidative period of Christianity to the period AD 995-1095, although the first missionaries made their advent in the early 9th century (820-840). Certain groups of Scandinavian origin, the Rus, were fully Christianized by 988 and this fact certainly had implications to Scandanavia itself. Gamla Uppsala, the ceremonial center of the early pagan Swedish "kings" was destroyed by Ingold I in 1087 and a cathedral church later erected on the site of the older pagan temple.
 
Here are some nice pics:
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote M2ximilian Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jul 2009 at 22:14
Originally posted by Cryptic Cryptic wrote:

Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Here in southwestern part of Sweden we have among other some old churches. Christianity gained influence in these parts of our country in the 11th and 12th centuries.   
Architecture aside, I had no idea that it took Christianity that long to become the dominate religion in Scandanavia.  I had thought that the only late pagan hold out was Lithuania.


Well, Lithuania was for sure the last pagan hold out in Europe but you might say that being christianized in 11h and 12th century was very early for Baltic sea and Northern Europe region. Others like Latvians, Estonians, Finns, Prussians etc. were forced to take Christianity mostly in the 13th century.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Carcharodon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jul 2009 at 21:56
Originally posted by drgonzaga drgonzaga wrote:

Originally posted by Cryptic Cryptic wrote:

Originally posted by Carcharodon Carcharodon wrote:

Here in southwestern part of Sweden we have among other some old churches. Christianity gained influence in these parts of our country in the 11th and 12th centuries.   
Architecture aside, I had no idea that it took Christianity that long to become the dominate religion in Scandanavia.  I had thought that the only late pagan hold out was Lithuania.
 
Well Cryptic, it all depends upon how one defines time and place. The Knuds (Canutes) of Denmark were most certainly Christians and one can speak of major influence by the time of Olav Tryggvason and restrict the consolidative period of Christianity to the period AD 995-1095, although the first missionaries made their advent in the early 9th century (820-840). Certain groups of Scandinavian origin, the Rus, were fully Christianized by 988 and this fact certainly had implications to Scandanavia itself. Gamla Uppsala, the ceremonial center of the early pagan Swedish "kings" was destroyed by Ingold I in 1087 and a cathedral church later erected on the site of the older pagan temple.
 
Here are some nice pics:
 
 
Well, the story of Gamla Uppsala temple and its destruction are by many Scandinavian historians considered to belong to the realms of myth.
 
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